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Coronavirus England: Which areas are blocked after Leicester?


Thirty-six authorities in England have seen an increase in coronavirus cases in the past fourteen days, official figures announced today – when Leicester became the first area in Britain to be affected by a "local lock".

Public Health England (PHE) data shows that in Havering, London, and Wiltshire as a whole, confirmed Covid-19 infections increased the most by week (300 percent).

By comparison, Leicester saw a 5 percent increase in cases – from 39 cases between June 13th and 19th to 41 in the following seven days. According to government statistics, Leicester actually had the lowest percentage jump from week to week of all local authorities where the cases have increased.

MailOnline has now created an interactive tool that readers can use to find out whether the outbreak of coronavirus in their region has increased or shrunk in the past 14 days – and how many cases have been diagnosed since the onset of the UK crisis.

It comes after Matt Hancock confirmed last night that Leicester – a city in the East Midlands where 330,000 people live – would receive a two-week block extension. Angry residents accused the “idiots” in the city of not adhering to social distance.

The streets of the city center were deserted this morning when the health minister announced that the police would enforce the curbs to enforce laws to strengthen their powers. He also admitted that measures to slow the spread of the coronavirus in Leicester had not worked in the past 11 days.

The city's mayor announced today that he wished ministers had warned of the outbreak "a long time ago". A city council told MailOnline today that a quarter of the new cases occurred in the North Evington community in the east of the city.

Actions for Leicester that were first announced last night in a dramatic statement to the Commons include:

  • All nonessential deals are closed as of today, and the law must be enforced to support the new restrictions after more than 800 cases have been registered in Leicester since mid-June and the area accounted for around 10 percent of all positive tests in the region in the UK last week;
  • The schools will be closed from Thursday and will not be opened again until the next semester, as there are fears that an unusually high incidence among children will drive the spread. They remain open to vulnerable children and descendants of key workers.
  • People are advised to avoid all travel to, from and within Leicester and to "stay at home as much as possible". However, there is currently no formal travel ban.
  • The loosening of the block in England on Saturday does not apply to Leicester, which means that pubs, restaurants, hairdressers and cinemas remain closed.
  • Unlike the rest of England, where the most clinically vulnerable can spend more time outdoors, city protection is not relaxed on July 6th.

Data compiled by Public Health England (PHE) shows that Havering and Wiltshire saw the largest increase in confirmed Covid-19 infections over the week (300 percent). In comparison, Leicester saw a 5 percent increase in cases – from 39 cases registered between June 13th and 19th to 41 in the following seven days

The Leicestershire County Council released this map today, which shows the area subject to strict blocking measures

The Leicestershire County Council released this map today, which shows the area subject to strict blocking measures

PHE – a branch of the Department of Health – updates coronavirus case data every afternoon based on numbers of health chiefs in each home country.

However, the figures produced for England only contain first pill swab tests, which according to official figures are only given to patients with medical needs or key personnel.

Positive results from second-pillar tests performed by trading partners are added to the total case fee, but no geographic breakdown is currently provided.

For example, government data shows that Britain has officially recorded 311,965 Covid-19 cases since the February crisis got out of control.

The data show how the Coronavirus outbreak in Leicester has increased over time. The UK figures only include first pillar swab tests which, according to official sources, are only given to patients with medical needs or key personnel

The data show how the Coronavirus outbreak in Leicester has increased over time. The UK figures only include first pillar swab tests which, according to official sources, are only given to patients with medical needs or key personnel

The streets of Leicester were almost empty this morning when residents responded to warnings of an increase in the corona virus

The streets of Leicester were almost empty this morning when residents responded to warnings of an increase in the corona virus

The market remained boarded up in Leicester today, and the blockage should be tightened again to combat the spread

The market remained boarded up in Leicester today, and the blockage should be tightened again to combat the spread

The Gallowtree Gate in Leicester today prepares as a local for the new closure after an increase in the corona virus

The Gallowtree Gate in Leicester today prepares as a local for the new closure after an increase in the corona virus

LEICESTER'S STREETS ARE LEAVED ON THE FIRST DAY OF LOCAL BLOCKING, as residents blame Spike in cases of "idiots".

Angry residents of Leicester blamed "idiots" who break the rules of social distance today for an explosion in coronavirus cases. Ministers warned people of arrest if they lifted a new block against the city.

Matt Hancock has stated that all non-essential businesses in the area need to be closed just two weeks after they reopen to find out which communities across the country will face in the event of a flare up.

Schools will also close on Thursday, fearing that the increase in cases will be caused by child transmission. The easing planning for the rest of England on July 4th is now on the agenda in Leicester at least until July 18th.

The streets of the city center were deserted this morning when Mr. Hancock confirmed that the police would enforce the curbs and promised to enforce laws to strengthen their powers.

However, he hinted that there would be no additional compensation for companies, and faced a backlash after admitting that there would be no ban on cars or trains entering the city. The limits of the restrictions were only revealed this morning, adding to the chaos.

There is also anger that measures have not been taken earlier, with complaints that ministers have been keeping local authorities in the dark for more than a week after finding a worrying surge in some cases.

In a round of interviews designed to calm an anxious public this morning, Hancock said the government is mobilizing its strategy to fight localized outbreaks – termed "punch in the mouth" by Boris Johnson.

“It is so important that we get a grip on this spike that happened in Leicester. We will close the deal legally and change the law in the next day or two to do so, ”he told BBC Breakfast.

He warned people not to "travel to, outside or within Leicester" unless it is essential, but added: "We are not currently putting this into law – we will review it and make changes if necessary. "

However, experts described the Leicester outbreak as "an expression of the early lifting of blocking measures" and predicted that other cities would need the same treatment.

And Health Committee chairman Jeremy Hunt described the action as "a necessary piercing of the high spirits" that had been built up in England when the ban loosened.

However, PHE has only released area-based data for 63 percent of infections – meaning the location of 115,000 confirmed cases is missing.

The massive differences in numbers can be clearly seen in Leicester. Leicester City Council (LCC) claims that there have been 3,216 laboratory-confirmed coronavirus cases across the city since the UK outbreak got out of control in February.

Local officials announced that 944 of these Covid-19 infections have been diagnosed in the past 14 days, meaning the city's epidemic has grown about 70.6 percent since mid-June. This corresponds to approximately 977 coronavirus cases per 100,000 people.

However, this data, which is transmitted to the LCC and takes into account the results of all tests carried out in the NHS, public health in England and in commercial laboratories, is not publicly available.

Government-released data show that Leicester has registered only 1,056 coronavirus cases since the pandemic – a third of the number received by LCC. It was shown that only 366 new infections were confirmed in May and June.

Data on the results of the first pillar tests analyzed by The Daily Telegraph show that Leicester had the second highest number of cases in all of England last week – after only Kent (101).

However, the rate in Kent – the highest municipality with the most diagnosed cases (5,591) – has dropped 16 percent week by week.

Ministers warned for the first time last month that individual cities could be closed again if the coronavirus cases increased again as soon as the restrictions were relaxed.

Officials will carefully monitor the impact on certain areas and combat hot zones by introducing “local barriers” where restrictions are reintroduced.

Nine of the 36 agencies that have cases of Covid-19, including Sunderland, Portsmouth and York, did not register between June 13 and 19.

They all recorded either one or two cases the following week, which is why they were added to the list of areas where outbreaks appear to be increasing.

Doncaster, a city in South Yorkshire, saw the largest real increase in coronavirus cases during the two-week period, from 11 to 32.

The London boroughs of Hammersmith and Fulham (seven to 18) and Ealing (five to 14) also saw large jumps in the actual number of cases.

Thirteen other London boroughs also see an increase in coronavirus cases, according to analysis of The Telegraph numbers.

However, official numbers show that the number of infections is falling. The average number of cases confirmed in the laboratory has dropped to 894 – the lowest since March.

However, the National Statistics Office (ONS), which analyzes the size of the outbreak, warned last week that the rate at which the outbreak is shrinking has "flattened".

It is estimated that 3,200 people still get the coronavirus every day in England – a little less than the previous week with 3,800 infections a day.

MORE MISERY FOR LEICESTER SHOP OWNERS "WITHIN 500 YARDS" LOCKDOWN BOUNDARY

James West, 25, a sole proprietor of a design company in the village of Thurmaston, said he opened the store this morning and was not sure how long he could do business with

James West, 25, a sole proprietor of a design company in the village of Thurmaston, said he opened the store this morning and was not sure how long he could do business with

A Leicester shopkeeper spoke of his frustration after his shop fell within 500 meters of the border due to new restrictions, and he was forced to close his doors a week after it reopened.

James West, 25, sole owner of Thurmaston Design and Print Co in the village of Thurmaston, said he opened the store this morning and was not sure how long he could do business with.

Eventually, details of the boundaries were released after 10 a.m., confirming that he had to close again.

& # 39; I'm only in brackets. So I opened at 9am and closed an hour later, ”he told the PA news agency. "I could have had an extra hour in bed!"

Mr. West said he was "very frustrated with the lack of guidance" that he and others in the region had received so far, adding that the local Mayor of Charnwood "was the only person in an agency who provided complete information got any use & # 39 ;.

He said: “I opened my shop for the first time last week and saw an immediate increase in orders. Now I'm worried that this change will not come from any orders. I was not entitled to a lot of government funding because I have not been completely open for three years. "

Mr. West said the loss of walk-in trade and the vacation of many of his business customers have made the past few months particularly tough.

He added that he and his partner Mia Skain had moved into their first home in February, but the lock had since made them unable to pay themselves properly.

Mr. West said: “We had some savings, so we made the most of them. But I was hoping that this would be the beginning of better things. & # 39;

Just a month ago, the ONS – whose estimates are based on swab tests of up to 25,000 people – stated that up to 9,000 cases actually occurred every day.

Other models from PHE indicate that during the peak of the crisis in March, 360,000 people were hit daily, but the outbreak quickly subsided.

Department of Health statistics showed yesterday that only 815 Britons were diagnosed with coronavirus. But government figures never show the true extent of the outbreak.

Thousands of people who become infected with the virus – scientifically known as SARS-CoV-2 – never dab off because they don't realize that they are sick, couldn't get a test, or the result was wrong.

It is not clear how many of the confirmed coronavirus tests announced yesterday were actually conducted in NHS or PHE laboratories.

This is because government data released every afternoon expires from the date of the sample or the time the cases occurred and not at the time of the actual recording.

For example, on June 28 in England, only nine people were blotted positive for the disease – although 901 cases were officially registered on that day.

Mr. Hancock confirmed last night that Leicester would face a two-week extension. After increasing speculation, the city would be the first to be affected by local measures.

Today he announced that the Leicestershire police will enforce the new ban and ensure that all stores except supermarkets and pharmacies are closed by at least July 18.

Mr. Hancock spoke about the move this morning and told BBC Breakfast: “It is so important that we manage this rise in Leicester.

The Tory minister urged people not to travel "in, out of or within Leicester" unless it was essential.

Language barriers, high levels of diabetes and poverty among BICE residents in Leicester have been blamed for the rise in Covid-19.

Mr. Hancock admitted that they looked at areas with similar demographics in the North West and Yorkshire, but said: "Leicester is much worse than other cities."

City council officials said Leicester saw an increase of more than 940 cases in just two weeks this month.

However, the PHE data, which comes from first pillar tests, shows that only 350 cases have been registered since early May.

The city's mayor, Sir Peter Soulsby, said at a press conference today that he wished ministers had "warned" of the outbreak "a long time ago" and revealed that local health chiefs are still working through a "mountain" of data to see where the virus spreads

The city's mayor, Sir Peter Soulsby, said at a press conference today that he wished ministers had "warned" of the outbreak "a long time ago" and revealed that local health chiefs are still working through a "mountain" of data to see where the virus spreads

Data compiled by Public Health England (PHE) show that in Havering (left) the confirmed Covid-19 infections increased the most from week to week (300 percent).

Wiltshire - home of Salisbury - also saw a 300 percent increase in some cases

Data compiled by Public Health England (PHE) show that in Havering (left) and Wiltshire (right, looking at a street in central Salisbury, Wiltshire), confirmed Covid-19 infections increased the most from week to week (300 ) Percent)

Royal Logistics Corp soldiers operate a mobile corona virus test site at the Evington Leisure Center in Leicester yesterday. One of them carries a box in which the drivers can use their Covid 19 swabs

Royal Logistics Corp soldiers operate a mobile corona virus test site at the Evington Leisure Center in Leicester yesterday. One of them carries a box in which the drivers can use their Covid 19 swabs

HOW A LARGE BAME POPULATION, POVERTY AND BAGED HOUSES MAY LEAVE LEICESTER'S SPIKE

Government officials, local politicians and scientists disagree as to whether Leicester is experiencing a real increase in certain cases or whether better tests simply find more of them where it wasn't before.

It is also not clear whether there are any characteristics of Leicester that make it more likely that an increase will occur in certain cases, or whether accidental coincidences have led to the first “second wave” taking place there. Experts say that many of the risk factors in Leicester are the same in all major cities in England.

The city's mayor, Sir Peter Soulsby, told BBC Radio 4 this morning that a report sent to him by the government actually confirmed that the increase in the number of positives identified was very likely due to increased testing, and that in fact, maybe nothing is of great importance in these results. & # 39;

The city's director of public health, Ivan Browne, said: “Interestingly, (in some cases an increase) it is very much the younger working age population and mostly the eastern part of our city. We have started to see this level through our test program.

“Young people work in many industries across the city. At this stage, we try to collect as much epidemiological information as we can to really try to understand and understand it. I don't think we see a single source or smoking gun at the moment. "

It was always likely that city overvoltages would occur first. There are more people who increase the risk, and these people are more likely to live in densely populated areas and come into contact with strangers on a regular basis.

Dr. Shaun Fitzgerald of Cambridge University said: “There will be differences in the ease with which people can maintain physical distances between densely populated areas and rural environments. So it's not surprising to me that we may see localized torches. Oops, which in turn have to be suppressed by delayed relaxation or temporary reintroduction of some restrictions on certain movements and activities. "

Leicester also has a high level of deprivation, which affects people's lives in a way that puts them at risk of getting the virus.

Dr. Simon Clarke, a microbiologist at the University of Reading, told MailOnline: “In disadvantaged areas, people have to go to work more often, are less able to work from home, and use public transportation more often. You cannot distance yourself from others. & # 39;

The city's Samworth Brothers sandwich factory reported over the weekend that it had diagnosed cases of Covid-19 among its employees.

Food processing factories pose a higher risk of transmission because the virus can survive longer in cold environments on hard surfaces and people's airways become more susceptible to infection.

Dr. Clarke added that the type of work people do could increase their risk.

"Blue collar cities are now at higher risk than places like London and Manchester that offer more financial services," he added.

“Factories and manufacturing work are ways (for people) to mix, and it's about mixing. You would not build a food processing plant in London because it is too expensive. & # 39;

The ethnicity of Leicester residents could also affect the risk of the coronavirus spreading rapidly – 37 percent of the people in the city were Asians or British Asians at the 2011 census, 28 percent of whom had Indian heritage.

A local researcher said multi-generation MailOnline households were an integral part of Asian culture, and grandparents often lived with their younger relatives. This leads to larger households, which increases the risk that more people will get the virus from an infected family member.

When older people live at home, they are more likely to become seriously ill and be tested and recorded as a patient, which adds to the statistics.

Research has shown that younger people are more likely to have mild symptoms or not even notice that they are ill, which reduces the likelihood that they will be tested and show up in the data collection.

Professor Brendan Wren of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine added: “Why this outbreak occurred in the eastern part of Leicester is unclear and we may never know because the number of cases may be too large to be the smallest Go to detail of the original source (s) of infection. "

Professor Paul Hunter, an infectious disease specialist at the University of East Anglia, admitted that the number of cases in Leicester "definitely" has not decreased.

He said to MailOnline: "It (the outbreak) grumbled a bit, but it doesn't look that dramatic to me, so I don't know where these big numbers come from."

Professor Hunter added: “It is very worrying that much of the data needed to assess risk at the local level is not made publicly available.

& # 39; The local test results currently available on the UK's Covid-19 dashboard do not include tests performed by commercial laboratories.

“Without all the tests in local government data, people cannot adequately assess their local risk. When you look at the dashboard data for Leicester, it's not so obvious that the infection will reappear there. & # 39;

Leicester City Mayor Sir Peter Soulsby said the local closure announced last night was "more far-reaching than expected". He said at a press conference: "I am obviously very, very concerned about the effects on the well-being of the city in general and the health of the people in the city, but also about the city's economy."

"One of the things we've been stressing to the government lately is that we will need support if Leicester is banned and its economy hovered a little longer than was previously the case in the pandemic throughout the pandemic . " Great Britain, restored here in Leicester. & # 39;

He also said that those responsible are still trying to find out more about where the virus is in the city, and said, “We need to know more about where it is in the community.

"I have had a lot of speculation and many questions about where it is in the community, and we have not yet been able to give satisfactory answers, including to other parts of the community that need the intervention."

"Which neighborhoods, which municipalities, which streets."

Angry residents of Leicester blamed "idiots" who violated the rules of social distance for an explosion in coronavirus cases. Ministers warned people of arrest if they lifted a new block against the city from today.

Matt Hancock has stated that all non-essential businesses in the area need to be closed just two weeks after they reopen to find out which communities across the country will face in the event of a flare up.

Schools will also close on Thursday, fearing that the increase in cases will be caused by child transmission. The easing planning for the rest of England on July 4th is now on the agenda in Leicester at least until July 18th.

Hancock hinted that there would be no additional compensation for businesses and faced a backlash after admitting that there would be no ban on cars or trains entering the city. It is not even clear where the limits of the restrictions will be.

There is also anger that no action has been taken earlier, with complaints that ministers have been keeping local authorities in the dark for more than a week after finding a worrying surge in some cases.

In a round of interviews designed to calm an anxious public this morning, Hancock said the government is mobilizing its strategy to combat localized outbreaks – termed "punch in the mouth" by Boris Johnson.

“It is so important that we get a grip on this spike that happened in Leicester. Wir werden die Geschäfte gesetzlich schließen und das Gesetz in den nächsten ein oder zwei Tagen ändern, um dies zu tun “, sagte er gegenüber BBC Breakfast.

Er warnte die Menschen davor, "nach, außerhalb oder innerhalb von Leicester" zu reisen, es sei denn, dies ist wesentlich, fügte jedoch hinzu: "Wir setzen dies derzeit nicht in das Gesetz um – wir werden dies überprüfen und gegebenenfalls Änderungen vornehmen."

Experten bezeichneten den Ausbruch in Leicester jedoch als "Ausdruck der vorzeitigen Aufhebung von Sperrmaßnahmen" und sagten voraus, dass andere Städte die gleiche Behandlung benötigen würden.

Und der Vorsitzende des Gesundheitsausschusses, Jeremy Hunt, beschrieb die Aktion als "notwendiges Durchstechen der Hochstimmung", die in England aufgebaut worden war, als sich die Sperre lockerte.

Herr Hancock gab bekannt, dass Tests in den letzten zehn Tagen eine „ungewöhnlich hohe Inzidenz bei Kindern in Leicester“ ergeben haben, die selbst wahrscheinlich nicht krank sind, diese aber an Erwachsene weitergeben könnten.

WIE GROSS IST DER TATSÄCHLICHE COVID-19-AUSBRUCH IN LEICESTER?

Der Stadtrat von Leicester (LCC) behauptet, dass es in der ganzen Stadt 3.216 im Labor bestätigte Coronavirus-Fälle gegeben habe, seit der Ausbruch Großbritanniens im Februar außer Kontrolle geriet.

Lokale Beamte gaben bekannt, dass 944 dieser Covid-19-Infektionen in den letzten 14 Tagen diagnostiziert wurden – was bedeutet, dass die Epidemie der Stadt seit Mitte Juni um rund 70,6 Prozent gewachsen ist.

Dies entspricht ungefähr 977 Coronavirus-Fällen pro 100.000 Menschen.

Diese dem LCC übermittelten Daten, die die Ergebnisse aller Tests berücksichtigen, die im NHS, im öffentlichen Gesundheitswesen in England und in kommerziellen Labors durchgeführt wurden, sind jedoch nicht öffentlich zugänglich.

Nur die geografische Aufteilung der Tests der ersten Säule, die nach Angaben der Regierung nur Patienten mit medizinischem Bedarf oder Schlüsselkräften zur Verfügung gestellt werden, wird vom Gesundheitsministerium jeden Nachmittag veröffentlicht.

Diese Daten zeigen, dass Leicester seit Beginn der Pandemie nur 1.056 Fälle des Coronavirus registriert hat – ein Drittel der von LCC erhaltenen Zahl. Es wurde festgestellt, dass im Mai und Juni nur 366 Neuinfektionen bestätigt wurden.

Darunter sind 41, die zwischen dem 20. und 26. Juni aufgezeichnet wurden. Im Vergleich dazu wurden in dem siebentägigen Zeitraum, der am 19. Juni endete, nur 39 registriert.

Die offiziellen Zahlen veranlassten Experten zu der Frage, ob Leicester tatsächlich von einem Ausbruch betroffen war oder nicht.

Professor Paul Hunter, ein Spezialist für Infektionskrankheiten an der University of East Anglia, sagte, Leicesters Covid-19-Ausbruch habe ein wenig gemurrt, "aber für mich sieht es nicht so dramatisch aus".

Er sagte gegenüber MailOnline, es sei "sehr besorgniserregend", dass die meisten Coronavirus-Daten, die zur Abschätzung des Risikos auf lokaler Ebene benötigt werden, von Gesundheitsbehörden nicht öffentlich zugänglich gemacht werden.

Er sagte: "Es gibt unter 18-Jährige, die positiv getestet wurden. Da Kinder die Krankheit übertragen können, ist es unserer Meinung nach am sichersten, die Schulen zu schließen." Sie haben dies bis Donnerstag verschoben, damit die Eltern die Kinderbetreuung organisieren können. "

Den Bewohnern wurde geraten, zu Hause zu bleiben, und sie wurden vor allen wichtigen Reisen gewarnt, nachdem seit Mitte Juni in Leicester mehr als 940 Covid-19-Fälle aufgetreten waren.

Das Gebiet machte in der vergangenen Woche rund 10 Prozent aller positiven Fälle in Großbritannien aus.

Herr Hancock sagte, "in einigen Fällen" würde die Sperrung von der Polizei durchgesetzt, während rechtliche Änderungen vorgenommen würden, so dass nicht wesentliche Einzelhandelsgeschäfte nicht mehr geöffnet sind.

"Wir werden in Kürze in den nächsten Tagen eine Gesetzesänderung vorlegen, da einige der Maßnahmen, die wir leider in Leicester ergreifen mussten, eine rechtliche Grundlage erfordern", sagte er.

Als er darauf drängte, wie Menschen daran gehindert würden, außerhalb der Stadt zu reisen, sagte er: „Wir raten von allen Reisen nach und von und innerhalb von Leicester ab, und wie wir während des Gipfels gesehen haben, wird die überwiegende Mehrheit der Menschen bleiben nach diesen Regeln.

"Natürlich werden wir weitere Maßnahmen ergreifen, einschließlich der Einführung von Gesetzen, falls dies erforderlich ist, aber ich hoffe sehr, dass dies nicht der Fall ist."

Aber der Bürgermeister von Leicester, Sir Peter Soulsby, sagte, die neue Sperrung in der Stadt hätte viel früher erfolgen sollen.

Beim BBC-Frühstück sagte er: „Der Außenminister (Matt Hancock) gab bekannt, dass er glaubte, dass es vor fast zwei Wochen einen Ausbruch in Leicester gegeben habe.

"Seitdem haben wir uns bemüht, von ihnen Informationen darüber zu erhalten, welche Daten sie hatten, was sie zu der Annahme veranlasste, dass hier ein bestimmtes Problem vorliegt, und uns bemüht, sie dazu zu bringen, das Testniveau in Leicester aufrechtzuerhalten."

Er sagte, er habe "seit Wochen" versucht, auf Daten auf Testniveau in der Stadt zuzugreifen, und habe erst letzten Donnerstag Zugang erhalten.

When asked whether a local lockdown should have been brought in earlier, he said: 'If as seems to be the case, the figures suggest there are issues in the city, I would wish that they had shared that with us right from the start, and I wish they had taken a more speedy decision rather than leaving it 11 days from the Secretary of State's first announcement…

'That's a long gap, and a long time for the virus to spread.'

LEICESTER WOMAN LIVING WITH INCURABLE CANCER WON'T BE ABLE TO SEE HER MOTHER AFTER 17 WEEKS

Pictured: Michelle Teale with her mother Marian, who she hasn't seen in 17 weeks

Pictured: Michelle Teale with her mother Marian, who she hasn't seen in 17 weeks

A Leicester woman living with incurable cancer has said she is 'gutted' that the city's new lockdown means she will not be able to see her mother for the first time in 17 weeks.

Michelle Teale, 58, has stage four breast cancer which is 'treatable but not curable', putting her in the shielding group for Covid-19.

A change in government advice which comes into force on July 6 meant she was preparing to travel to Cleethorpes next week to see her 85-year-old mother, Marian, who lives on her own.

But now Leicester is being placed in additional lockdown measures because of a spike in coronavirus cases, that trip will have to wait.

'That's the upsetting part for me because she needs me as much as I need her,' Mrs Teale, who lives in Thorpe Astley, said. 'She's been really worried about me since I had my last surgery and I just haven't been able to see her.

'I'd arranged to see her the week commencing the sixth, so that was a big thing to create a little bubble with her, and I can't do it now, because it's non-essential travel.

'So that's a bit of a downer really. I feel quite gutted.'

Mrs Teale has scarcely left her home since March, except to go on occasional short walks, having undergone her most recent surgery in February.

She feels the spike in Leicester is because of 'people not following the guidelines' and believes advice from the government has not been clear enough.

Dr Bharat Pankhania, Senior Clinical Lecturer at University of Exeter Medical School predicted more cities will be locked down in the same way.

He said: 'Going forward; six months, nine months from today, we will have outbreaks in Manchester, Birmingham – other big cities'.

A councillor representing the area at the epicentre of Leicester’s coronavirus outbreak today criticised the Government for not acting quicker to tackle the increase in cases.

Councillor Rashmikant Joshi represents the North Evington ward, which has the highest number of cases in the city. Following a spike of 800-plus Covid-19 cases in Leicester since mid-June, North Evington accounts for almost 200 of them, according to the latest figures seen by Mr Joshi.

He told MailOnline: 'The Government knew about this increase in coronavirus cases in Leicester almost 12 days ago and has not done anything about it until this week, when it announced a local lockdown. Even then we were only informed at the last minute and had no idea what was going on.

'The Government didn’t work with the city authority or local public health bodies to put a plan in place. We have been asking for information for the past 12 days and they have still not come forward with what we require.

'It’s disgraceful the way in which this has been handled. There’s a lot of panic and anxiety across Leicester but particularly in my ward.'

Almost 60 per cent of North Evington’s population is of South Asian background, which Mr Joshi claims may account for the coronavirus increase in the area. North Evington is made up of tightly packed terraced homes and is the site of a number of religious places of worship and busy shops.

He said: 'We have a lot of inter-generational households, where young people live with their grandparents. South Asians also tend to live in larger family groups, which increases the risk of infection.

'Since the easing of the lockdown, a lot of youngsters have been going out more and not maintaining social distance. There’s a high chance that they came home and passed on the virus to elderly relatives.'

Mr Joshi, 62 maintained that health and economic factors could also have played a significant part in the coronavirus increase.

He said: 'A lot of people in this community also have underlying health conditions, which makes them more vulnerable to coronavirus. They also work in low paid jobs and continued working throughout the lockdown and were going out more than people in other, more affluent areas.'

The councillor revealed that his wife and a number of his relatives had also contracted coronavirus over the past three months and that he had been in self-isolation on three separate occasions.

Mr Joshi added: 'We still don’t know the exact reasons as to why North Evington and Leicester have had a high number of coronavirus cases. We have asked the Government for a fuller breakdown of the figures but have still not received them.

'We are still waiting to understand the full picture but a combination of cultural, health and economic factors have clearly played a big part in what’s occurred.'

COUNCILLOR OF WARD AT HEART OF THE CITY'S OUTBREAK SLAMS THE GOVERNMENT FOR NOT ACTING QUICKER

A councillor representing the area at the epicentre of Leicester’s coronavirus outbreak has criticised the Government for not acting quicker to tackle the increase in cases.

Councillor Rashmikant Joshi represents the North Evington ward, which has the highest number of cases in the city. Following a spike of 800-plus Covid-19 cases in Leicester since mid-June, North Evington accounts for almost 200 of them, according to the latest figures seen by Mr Joshi.

He told MailOnline: ‘The Government knew about this increase in coronavirus cases in Leicester almost 12 days ago and has not done anything about it until this week, when it announced a local lockdown. Even then we were only informed at the last minute and had no idea what was going on.

‘The Government didn’t work with the city authority or local public health bodies to put a plan in place. We have been asking for information for the past 12 days and they have still not come forward with what we require.

‘It’s disgraceful the way in which this has been handled. There’s a lot of panic and anxiety across Leicester but particularly in my ward.’

Almost 60% of North Evington’s population is of South Asian background, which Mr Joshi claims may account for the coronavirus increase in the area. North Evington is made up of tightly packed terraced homes and is the site of a number of religious places of worship and busy shops.

He said: ‘We have a lot of inter-generational households, where young people live with their grandparents. South Asians also tend to live in larger family groups, which increases the risk of infection.

‘Since the easing of the lockdown, a lot of youngsters have been going out more and not maintaining social distance. There’s a high chance that they came home and passed on the virus to elderly relatives.’

Mr Joshi, 62 maintained that health and economic factors could also have played a significant part in the coronavirus increase.

He said: ‘A lot of people in this community also have underlying health conditions, which makes them more vulnerable to coronavirus. They also work in low paid jobs and continued working throughout the lockdown and were going out more than people in other, more affluent areas.’

The councillor revealed that his wife and a number of his relatives had also contracted coronavirus over the past three months and that he had been in self-isolation on three separate occasions.

Mr Joshi added: ‘We still don’t know the exact reasons as to why North Evington and Leicester have had a high number of coronavirus cases. We have asked the Government for a fuller breakdown of the figures but have still not received them.

‘We are still waiting to understand the full picture but a combination of cultural, health and economic factors have clearly played a big part in what’s occurred.’

Young people in Leicester, who are believed to be disproportionately affected by the return of the virus, are unsurprised Covid is making a comeback.

Molly Farmer-Law, 16, has just finished her GCSE year and said friends could not resist the temptation to party, even though she has stayed in.

'Quite a few people have been meeting up' she said.

'Not many people my age were taking it seriously. People had just finished school and wanted to meet. We've seen it on videos.'

And even if pubs and clubs stay closed in Leicester few think it will curb social activity among the 18 to 30s as the summer moves into full swing.

'Everyone is still doing what they were doing before' said Grace, 27, who did not want to give her full name.

'People will find somewhere for a drink. If they can't get it in Leicester they will go elsewhere or to illegal raves.

'There are a lot of abandoned warehouses around here, or they'll go to Nottingham or Loughborough. They will find somewhere' said the healthcare assistant, who has seen many cases of Covid among the people she cares for.

Student Faith Owolambi, 21, agreed. 'They will go somewhere else to meet up. Birmingham and Coventry are not far, or they will just go to the park.'

Pubs, clubs and restaurants in Leicester were already struggling financially after the lockdown began on March 23, and are now faced with another two weeks without being able to trade.

The Konak Turkish restaurant on the edge of the city centre has lost £50,000 and laid off 20 of its 26 staff since the lockdown began.

'They said we could open on July 4 and we were sold out,' said front of house manager Osman Macit, who is 24

'We had taken 46 bookings and we had spoken to staff about coming back and now we have to cancel all of that. It is all going out of the window. And we don't know if it is going to be two weeks or more.'

Meanwhile, some Leicester residents are warning other cities to take the threat of a second wave seriously, since they could be next.

Retired maths teacher Mohamed Ahmed, 58, has been wearing a mask throughout the pandemic and does not intend to remove it when outdoors until next spring.

'I think this will happen in other places' he said. 'Once the lockdown is opened up people will not be that bothered and they will pass it on to other people.'

At Leicester Market, which has remained open throughout the pandemic, traders insisted the new rise of Covid in the city had nothing to do with them.

'The market has not been closed, but even now people are still scared to come out' said Stephen Powley, 56, who has worked on Leicester Market for more than 40 years.

The greengrocer, who was doing a reasonable trade in fresh fruit even though the number of shoppers is well down on pre-pandemic levels and more than half the pitchers are empty.

'There is more space here than queueing for the shops,' said the veteran trader, who has his son, Jack, 15, alongside while the schools are closed.

'This is safer than Sainsbury's or any other supermarket. It is spread out, it's in the open air. We have notices asking people to stay two metres apart and not to handle the produce.'

Colleague Buddy Abbott, 55, who came on the market as a teenage apprentice agreed. 'There have been no signs of Covid among market traders. If there was the market would be closed straight away.'

Leicester barber Blake Edwards, 38, had been ready to reopen his salon on July 4 before learning he would have to sit back and wait. The 38-year-old said the situation in Leicester was 'embarrassing'.

WHAT MEASURES ARE BEING IMPOSED IN THE LEICESTER LOCKDOWN?

A regional flare-up of coronavirus cases means Leicester will not emerge from parts of lockdown as swiftly as the rest of England.

As pubs, restaurants and cafes get ready to reopen across the country from Saturday, residents in Leicester have been told to stay at home, with schools and shops to shut this week.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock said the measures will be reviewed in two weeks, but what are they exactly?

What is closing down and why?

A spike in infections in Leicester means the city has three times more cases than the city with the next highest total.

Mr Hancock said the city's seven-day infection rate was 135 cases per 100,000.

Leicester City Council said it had seen 944 confirmed cases of Covid-19 in the past two weeks.

To arrest the spread of the virus, from Tuesday all non-essential shops will have to shut while schools will close their doors to most pupils from Thursday.

All but essential travel to, from and within the city is being discouraged, while residents are being told to stay at home unless absolutely necessary.

The planned reopening of more businesses including restaurants, pubs and hairdressers in England on July 4 will also not take place in the city.

Why are schools closing?

Mr Hancock said there had been 'a number of positive cases in the under-18s' detected through coronavirus testing.

He said that even though children are less likely to get ill from the disease, the decision to shut the city's schools was made to try to halt further transmissions.

'That's why we took the decision, with a heavy heart it has to be said, to close schools in Leicester and in Leicestershire, within the Leicester conurbation,' he said.

Schools will stay open for vulnerable youngsters and children of critical workers as they did before and people will be able to travel for childcare.

Some schools had already closed prior to the local lockdown.

What geographical area is covered?

As well as the city of Leicester, which had a population of 329,839 people at the 2011 census, the 'surrounding conurbation' will also be affected.

Mr Hancock previously cited the town of Oadby and the villages of Glenfield and Birstall as examples.

On Tuesday morning, Leicestershire County Council published a map of the lockdown area including the majority of the city itself and parts of Leicestershire that touch on the city's boundaries.

This includes parts of Blaby District and Charnwood in the county.

Previously, Mayor of Leicester Sir Peter Soulsby said policing the lockdown would be 'something of a challenge' without knowing what the boundaries were.

How will it be enforced?

Mr Hancock said the law will be changed in the next 'day or two' to close all non-essential shops in Leicester.

The Health Secretary told BBC Breakfast on Tuesday that the Government was not making non-essential travel illegal, but said it would if it had to.

Leicestershire Police said: 'This is a dynamic situation and we will adjust accordingly, providing proportionate policing under the relevant legislation to help keep people safe in Leicester, Leicestershire and Rutland.'

What support is available for the people of Leicester?

Mr Hancock said extra money was being sent to Leicester and Leicestershire councils 'to support them to enhance their communications' as well as making support available for people who need to self-isolate.

Through the councils, authorities will also help workplaces with coronavirus clusters to 'implement more stringently the Covid-secure guidelines'.

Mr Hancock added: 'We are providing funding for local support.

'I just want to reiterate to those who are in Leicester right now… that the furlough scheme is in existence and it works now in the same way that it's worked across the country.'

Mr Hancock said the Government is 'still getting to the bottom of' the reasons why the outbreak in Leicester has occurred.

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