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Coronavirus: Boris Johnson warns Britain against coming out of the forest.


Boris Johnson today warned that coronavirus cases "bubble up" in 30 cities across the UK because he insisted that the virus had "massive success" in reducing cases under "a certain degree of control" stand.

The prime minister said that there are between ten and 30 places where there is a risk of “hard locks” to control the virus after a locally increased increase in infections.

In Northallerton, North Yorkshire, he said to Sky News: “There are between ten and 30 places where there is a little bubbling. I think the whole country understands that the best way to deal with this is that we have hard local locks in these cities to get it under control. & # 39;

He added that the virus concentration in Leicester – the first city to be closed locally – is dropping due to a "big effort", but the British must not "be wrong" that "we are out of the woods somehow".

"It is absolutely important that we as a country keep our focus and discipline and don't pretend that we are out of the forest somehow or that everything is over because it is not all over." & # 39; he said.

"The most important thing we can do is stop a second wave, a really harmful second wave that will have real consequences."

The Prime Minister continued to insist that the country had "massive success" in reducing the number of "tragic deaths" during the pandemic.

"It is clear that this country is now having massive success in reducing the number of these tragic deaths," he said. “We have it under a certain degree of control at the moment. The number of deaths is good, declining well. & # 39;

T.The number of deaths dropped to a rolling daily average of 66 this week, compared to a maximum of 1,445 over a 24-hour period in April.

However, Mr Johnson warned that Britain is not yet out of the forest of the coronavirus crisis after official statistics showed that England had the highest mortality rate in Europe in the first half of 2020.

“Overall, the only way to control the corona virus is for everyone to follow the rules of social distance and work together to fight the virus.

"That's why I'm doing this point that I'm doing – we've done a lot. Together we have really reduced the incidence of the virus and reduced the number of deaths.

"As a country, it is absolutely important that we continue to keep our focus and discipline and not pretend that we are out of the forest somehow or that everything is over because it is not all over." he said.

His comments came after Health Minister Matt Hancock denied fueling panic and hysteria at Covid-19 after warning that a second wave "was starting to roll across Europe" – and defended the sudden decision to add Spain to the list Quarantine countries and extend isolation isolation period up to ten days for people who tested positive for symptoms.

Boris Johnson today warned that coronavirus cases "bubble up" in 30 cities across the UK because he insisted that the virus had "massive success" in reducing cases under "a certain degree of control" stands. He is pictured with Rishi Sunak and Priti Patel in a gin factory in Bedale, North Yorkshire

Mr. Johnson greeted a policeman with a touch of the elbow when he visited North Yorkshire Police headquarters today

Mr. Johnson greeted a policeman with a touch of the elbow when he visited North Yorkshire Police headquarters today

Interior Minister Priti Patel, who also attended the visit alongside the Prime Minister, laughed as he petted one of the police dogs

Interior Minister Priti Patel, who also attended the visit alongside the Prime Minister, laughed as he petted one of the police dogs

This morning, BBC broadcaster Nick Robinson has repeatedly asked Mr. Hancock if he is hysterical about rising cases in Europe and the UK, as infection rates are nowhere near the lockdown peak and are likely a symptom of the return of the Society to a new normal.

Mr. Robinson also asked if he was overreacting because he feared repeating mistakes number 10 made at the beginning of the outbreak, such as not quarantining travelers from abroad.

The health minister said, "No, it is not (risk hysteria). I am the Minister of Health in the middle of the pandemic.

“We are absolutely determined to protect this country and it makes me sad to see these increases elsewhere, but I will be vigilant and act quickly if we have to, because that is what the virus requires and the virus is moving fast and we have to. & # 39;

Matt Hancock's second wave warning was as follows:

  • Ministers confirmed that people who are now positive for coronavirus or have telltale symptoms will be asked to stay at home for ten days from the current seven-day self-isolation period.
  • Boris Johnson will add more countries to the UK quarantine list tomorrow.
  • Sir Patrick Vallance and Professor Chris Whitty want stricter border controls immediately after figures show that 1,300 people with Covid-19 entered the UK at the start of the pandemic.
  • Leicester's blockage is being reviewed today – 48 hours earlier than expected, as official statistics show that the city's coronavirus infection rate has halved within 14 days.
  • Holiday giant Tui closes 166 high street stores in the UK and Republic of Ireland, the UK's largest tour operator announced.
  • According to a shocking study, up to 21,000 people have died from the unintended consequences of the ban, many of them due to lack of access to health care.

Labor MP Chris Bryant today urged ministers to calm down and said, "We need a stiletto, not a sledgehammer," to tackle coronavirus clusters. He said: "It makes me so angry that the government is so relaxed with its language. There is no second wave in all of Europe. In some areas there are worrying signs of single peaks of an increased infection. & # 39;

Top scientists today admitted that the coronavirus is unlikely to ever be eradicated, saying it could persist for decades and infect people "multiple times over their lifespan". Critics argued that Britain must "learn to live with it" because the virus will continue to spread.

Experts have also warned that countries like New Zealand that are trying to completely eradicate the virus will become infected if they reopen their borders, as will be inevitable.

Britain announced another 763 new coronavirus cases yesterday, up 14 percent in a week – but well below the 5,000 new cases per day recorded at the time of the outbreak. Scientists at Cambridge University believe that the outbreaks in the stay-cation hotspots in the south-west and south-east of England are getting bigger, but are only slightly worse.

Mr. Johnson tries out a North Yorkshire Police Rural Taskforce bike that is electrically powered

Mr. Johnson tries out a North Yorkshire Police Rural Taskforce bike that is electrically powered

Keith Neal, Emeritus Professor of Infectious Diseases at the University of Nottingham, told MailOnline: “We have to learn to live with it. The virus will continue to spread and cause spikes or clusters unless we comply with restrictions or receive a vaccine.

"I don't think we'll ever eradicate the virus. I think it's likely that the virus has existed for decades and has infected people multiple times throughout their lives. & # 39;

When asked during a visit to North Yorkshire whether he was ashamed of the ONS analysis showing that Britain led Europe for the number of excessive deaths in 2020, Mr. Johnson said: "We mourn every death, that we had during the coronavirus epidemic.

“What I would say to them (families of the deceased) is that we really owe them to continue our work to fight the virus.

“It is clear that this country is now having massive success in reducing the number of these tragic deaths.

“We have it under a certain degree of control at the moment. The number of deaths is good, declining well.

“But I have to tell you that we expect the virus to resurrect in some other European countries. You can see what happened in the United States. & # 39;

Mr. Johnson urged people to continue adhering to the rules of social detachment and hygiene to stop the disease from spreading.

He said, “Overall, the only way to control the corona virus is for everyone to follow the rules of social distance and work together to fight the virus.

"That's why I'm doing this point that I'm doing – we've done a lot. Together we have really reduced the incidence of the virus and reduced the number of deaths.

“But it can reappear and we have seen what is happening in other European countries. So I'm telling people that they don't lose focus, don't lose discipline, keep following these guidelines, and if you have symptoms, do a test. & # 39;

The Prime Minister said it would be a mistake for Britain to believe that the coronavirus crisis has ended.

"As a country, it is absolutely important that we continue to keep our focus and discipline and not pretend that we are out of the forest somehow or that everything is over because it is not all over." he said.

As number 10 has confirmed today, the period in which people with coronavirus symptoms in England have to isolate themselves must be increased to 10 days.

ENGLAND suffered the most excessive deaths in Europe during the COVID-19 pandemic

England had the highest number of deaths in Europe due to the coronavirus pandemic, new figures announced today.

By the end of May, England had the highest number of deaths in excess of 21 European countries compared to the National Statistics Office – deaths for all reasons above the level normally expected.

While other countries saw a higher increase in deaths between February and June, England had the longest uninterrupted period of increased mortality, meaning that the overall death toll was highest.

Excessive deaths include deaths for all reasons, but can serve as evidence of how severe coronavirus outbreaks were – because not all deaths caused by the virus are registered by the authorities.

It was Spain and Italy that had the biggest spikes in the excessive deaths known as "summits", suggesting that they were the hardest hit on the continent.

Bergamo, one of the first places in Europe to be closed, had the highest peak in mortality. In the week ending March 20, there were 847.7 percent more deaths than usual.

The highest peak in deaths in the UK was in Brent in the week of April 17th at 357.5 percent at the height of the British crisis.

Patients who have been confirmed to have Covid, or who have a cough, fever, or loss of smell or taste, were previously instructed to stay at home for seven days.

Deputy chief physician Professor Jonathan Van-Tam informed reporters that the change would be made between seven and ten days after the onset of the disease due to the "low but real likelihood of infectivity".

Health officials still believe there is evidence that people with symptomatic coronavirus are most contagious just before and in the days immediately after their symptoms appear.

However, there is also a small but tangible possibility that people with Covid-19 will still be infectious between seven and nine days after their symptoms begin, which has led to a change in the guidelines today.

The health chief stressed that the previous advice was "at least seven days" rather than just seven days. People whose symptoms persisted were advised to stay isolated for longer.

Scientists welcomed the move today. Dr. Julian Tang, respiratory disease expert at the University of Leicester, said: & # 39;The evidence for this 10-day instead of 7-day cut-off has been around for a few months – and more and more studies confirm this.

“There have been concerns about the previous 7-day isolation lock for some time – because it just doesn't match the evidence. Finally, now. & # 39;

Mr Hancock also hinted that more European countries could be added to the UK quarantine list to prevent Covid-19 from getting a stranglehold in the UK after Ministers were accused of being too slow to respond early to the Pandemic to respond.

He told Sky News: “I'm worried about a second wave. You can see a second wave across Europe. We have to do everything we can to prevent it from reaching these shores.

"It's not just Spain, there are other countries where the number of cases is increasing and we are absolutely determined to do everything we can to protect this country."

He later told the BBC: "In Britain there is a real risk of an increase in the number of cases, but we will move forward quickly if necessary."

The quarantine time for people returning to the UK from other countries such as Spain would be reduced to 10 days, with 14 days being tested according to the same plans that were claimed today.

Isolation rules have previously created confusion as those who have been confirmed by a test to have the virus are instructed to isolate for seven days while their "close contacts" are faced for 14 days. The inequality was due to the time it took to develop symptoms of the virus.

The government has sometimes been accused of “mixed news” across the rules.

The policy change was made after talks between Sir Patrick Vallance, the government's primary scientific advisor, Boris Johnson, and senior cabinet ministers on Monday at number 10.

Mr. Johnson is said to have told them: "We need to act quickly" with an increase in quarantine rules expected within 24 hours.

By the end of May, England had the highest relative mortality of 21 European countries compared to the Office for National Statistics. However, the worst affected nations were Italy and Spain, which suffered the greatest peaks

By the end of May, England had the highest relative mortality of 21 European countries compared to the Office for National Statistics. However, the worst affected nations were Italy and Spain, which suffered the greatest peaks

In terms of major cities, the highest mortality rate in Madrid in the week ending March 27 was 432.7 percent. In the UK, Birmingham had the highest mortality rate of any major UK city in the week to April, at 249.7 percent 17

In terms of major cities, the highest mortality rate in Madrid in the week ending March 27 was 432.7 percent. In the UK, Birmingham had the highest mortality rate of any major UK city in the week to April, at 249.7 percent 17

CORONAVIRUS R RATE & # 39; IS ABOVE THE DESCRIBED LEVEL OF A SOUTHWEST AND SOUTHEAST & # 39;

The coronavirus R rate is projected to be above the feared level of one in the south-west and south-east of England.

Government scientists say the number of reproductions in the UK – the average number of people infected by every Covid-19 patient – is still between 0.7 and 0.9.

However, a team from Cambridge University estimates that it could be above one in two regions and is on the verge of reaching levels in all parts of the country except the Midlands.

It is important that this number remains below one, otherwise the outbreak of the coronavirus can quickly increase again if people infect others around them faster.

Scientists analyze numbers of deaths and cases, as well as data on how many people have antibodies and social interactions to make their predictions that flow into SAGE.

According to their model, the R rate is the highest in the South West (1.04) – home to the stay cation hotspots of Cornwall, Devon and Dorset. It is also estimated to be over one in the southeast (1.02).

In three other regions – Northwest, East and London – the rate of reproduction has increased, which experts say is not an accurate method of measuring an outbreak in minor cases.

Scientists accused the lifting of the blocking measures, reports the Daily Telegraph. Infectious disease scientists warned that an increase would be inevitable.

Government scientific advisor Sir Patrick Vallance warned No10 that Britain could only be two or three weeks behind Spain's second-wave trajectory, according to The Times.

However, experts have asked ministers not to overreact to the small increase in some cases.

Professor Paul Hunter, an infectious disease expert at the University of East Anglia, told MailOnline: “I don't think we'll ever eradicate the virus. I think it's likely that the virus has existed for decades and has infected people multiple times throughout their lives.

However, due to the remaining immunity to previous infections or immunizations, the disease becomes far less serious and is likely to resemble a cold.

He added: "A country like New Zealand that has wiped out the virus will not become infected until it opens again, as it must do at some point."

Professor Keith Neal of the University of Nottingham told MailOnline: “We have to learn to live with it. The virus will continue to spread and cause spikes or clusters unless we comply with restrictions or receive a vaccine.

"We can experience small resurrections when people's behavior wears off, but we can tighten the restrictions in these hotspots, see Leicester – the disease is diminishing."

He added that Britain could live alongside the virus and keep the risk of transmission as low as possible "by wearing masks, working from home, restricting travel, taking appropriate action at hotspots".

Professor Neal said: “You will always have hotspots like in Leicester and Spain. But every measure helps to reduce transmission routes. & # 39;

The moving average of daily falls in the UK has risen since the beginning of this month, while new restrictions and localized outbreaks have occurred in Stone, Staffordshire and Wrexham, North Wales in Oldham, Greater Manchester.

Yesterday's numbers showed that Oldham had overtaken Leicester to have England. Blackburn with Darwen is still the worst affected agency in the country.

However, today's NHS data show that with an infection rate of 53.1 cases per 100,000 people, they are in third place again from July 21 to 27.

Modeling at the University of Cambridge suggests that the R rate (left) has barely changed in London and is now 0.92 after falling below 0.5 after the block was introduced. The team also believes that cases (on the right) are declining and don't have to go up in the capital yet. The first blue line is March 23 when the block was introduced. The second blue line is May 11th, when the government released its Covid 19 recovery strategy. The red line is July 24th, the last day of modeling

The Coronavirus R rate in the Midlands (left) is much lower than in June, according to the Cambridge team. The cases (right) are also still declining, but much slower than before

The R rate in the east of England (left) is now 0.88, but has hardly changed in July. The number of daily cases (right) continues to decline, according to the scientists

However, the R rate appears to have risen above one in the southeast (right), and cases (right) are beginning to increase – from an estimated 669 infections on July 6 to 758 on July 24

It is also estimated that the R rate (left) in the southwest, the region of Devon, Cornwall and Dorset, has risen to over one. The team estimated there were 160 new infections in the region on July 24, compared to 136 on July 4

ARE CASES IN THE UK ON THE WAY?

Coronavirus cases in the UK have been on the rise for a fortnight – but deaths have barely changed and hospitalizations remain unchanged, according to official sources.

Ministry of Health statistics show that an average of 726 people test positive for the life-threatening virus daily. It's 33 percent higher than the 546 average exactly three weeks ago, the lowest since before the ban.

However, the number of Britons diagnosed with Covid-19 is much lower than on the darkest days of the April outbreak.

Around 5,000 positive tests were recorded daily during the height of the crisis, but this should be a massive underestimation due to the lack of tests. In April, fewer than 20,000 people were dabbed every day because of the virus. In the meantime, more than 100,000 tests are processed every day.

The number of coronavirus deaths has hardly changed in the past 10 days. The seven-day moving average is currently 66. For comparison: on Tuesday it was 65 and last Wednesday 64.

It can take weeks for infected patients to die from the coronavirus, which means that an increase in the last 14 days may not start until next week.

Hospital admissions – another indication of an outbreak that occurs before death – have hardly changed in the past week. Less than 100 people are accepted in England every day.

However, scientists from King & # 39; s College London believe that cases may still be on the rise. Data from a symptom tracking app that the team runs estimates that 2,110 people in the UK are infected with the virus every day, up from 1,884 in the past week. But the scientists believe the outbreak is stable.

The test numbers do not show the actual number of people infected because many people are infected with the virus, but never test positive for it, either because they do not recognize that they are sick, because they could not get a test, or because their result was wrong.

The rate in Leicester is currently 57.7 – slightly higher than on Wednesday, but by 15 percent in a week.

Leicester, the first place in the UK to have a mini-lock in place, is under review today – two days earlier than expected.

Fears of a recurrence of infections arise when scientists found that the coronavirus R rate in the south-west and south-east of England is above the feared level of 1.

Government scientists say the number of reproductions in the UK – the average number of people infected by every Covid-19 patient – is still between 0.7 and 0.9.

However, a team from Cambridge University estimates that it could be above one in two regions and is on the verge of reaching levels in all parts of the country except the Midlands.

It is important that this number remains below one, otherwise the outbreak of the coronavirus can quickly increase again if people infect others around them faster.

Scientists analyze numbers of deaths and cases, as well as data on how many people have antibodies and social interactions to make their predictions that flow into SAGE.

According to their model, the R rate is the highest in the South West (1.04) – home to the stay cation hotspots of Cornwall, Devon and Dorset. It is also estimated to be over one in the southeast (1.02).

In three other regions – Northwest, East and London – the rate of reproduction has increased, which experts say is not an accurate method of measuring an outbreak in minor cases.

Scientists accused the lifting of the blocking measures, reports the Daily Telegraph. Infectious disease scientists warned that an increase would be inevitable.

Despite the warnings, Boris Johnson was asked not to panic over the fear of a summer flood.

Former conservative leader Sir Iain Duncan Smith said ministers should continue their efforts to get the economy going by asking more workers to return to the office. He said: “The government's message is still very fearful, it has to be much more nuanced.

"You have to say," Look, this is a disease that broadly affects people with comorbidities. Protect the vulnerable, but the rest of you should get back to work. & # 39; Sir Iain added: "We seem to have lost the ability to balance the risk."

In the meantime, health officials said concerns about a new surge were "very high".

Niall Dickson, chief executive of the NHS confederation, told the all-party faction Coronavirus that non-covid productivity in NHS trusts is currently around 60 percent.

He called for an Amazon-style way for health and care workers to order personal protective equipment where it arrives the next day.

Dr. Chaand Nagpaul, chairman of the British Medical Association's council, said a further surge should not be seen as "inevitable" and it was time to be "more robust" to mitigate the threat.

The ban on most international holidays, according to the controversial Independent SAGE Group, repeats its request to the UK to get rid of the corona virus – but what would be the economic cost?

Britain should dramatically restrict foreign holidays and travel to completely eliminate the corona virus, rather than just restrict it, the independent SAGE committee argued.

The panel, which oversees the UK's official scientific advisory group, said a significant reduction in the number of people entering the country would allow officials to isolate all remaining cases and eradicate the virus.

This allegation contradicts the prevailing consensus between health professionals and government scientists who believe that community transmission is inevitable until a vaccine arrives, regardless of whether Britain closes its borders.

The demand for dramatic travel restrictions would also paralyze companies, especially holiday companies that have been hit by the pandemic.

The report quotes New Zealand, which relies on tourism for 5.5% of its GDP, but has suffered a devastating economic blow as it tried to close its borders almost entirely.

The government is already asking travelers to be quarantined for two weeks after returning from most countries.

Keith Neal, emeritus professor of infectious diseases at Nottingham University, said: "We have to learn to live with it. The virus will spread and cause peaks or clusters unless we comply with restrictions or receive a vaccine."

He also called for more precise public news about measures that people can take to stop the virus from spreading.

"When I look at something as simple as our social distance messages, we are told that the social distance is still two meters or one meter plus," he said.

"Do you think a member of the public understands what a meter plus means? What does the plus mean? Many do not really understand this because it is not clear and they have no social distance.

As damn numbers show today, England had the highest number of deaths in Europe due to the coronavirus pandemic.

By the end of May, England had the highest number of deaths in excess of 21 European countries compared to the National Statistics Office – deaths for all reasons above the level normally expected.

While other countries saw a higher increase in deaths between February and June, England had the longest uninterrupted period of increased mortality, meaning that the overall death toll was highest.

Excessive deaths include deaths for all reasons, but can serve as evidence of how severe coronavirus outbreaks were – because not all deaths caused by the virus are registered by the authorities.

It was Spain and Italy that had the biggest spikes in the excessive deaths known as "summits", suggesting that they were the hardest hit on the continent.

Bergamo, one of the first places in Europe to be closed, had the highest peak in mortality. In the week ending March 20, there were 847.7 percent more deaths than usual.

The highest peak in deaths in the UK was in Brent in the week of April 17th at 357.5 percent at the height of the British crisis.

Two top scientists said today that the ban on travel abroad would eliminate Covid-19 and give Britain the "best chance" to fulfill Boris Johnson's promise to return to normal life by Christmas.

Epidemiologists Professor David Hunter and Professor Neil Pearce believe the virus can be wiped out, but ministers would need to change course.

In a commentary in The Guardian, the couple said today, “It doesn't make any epidemiological sense to go abroad in the middle of a pandemic.

& # 39; With every incoming visitor from overseas or returning vacationers, the risk of bringing Covid-19 into the country increases.

& # 39; The government has so far justified allowing this trip because it believes that Community transmission of the virus in the UK is inevitable until a vaccine arrives. It is not. & # 39;

Sun worshipers and holidaymakers flock to the beach at the seaside resort of Lyme Regis in Dorset to enjoy the scorching weather

Sun worshipers and holidaymakers flock to the beach at the seaside resort of Lyme Regis in Dorset to enjoy the scorching weather

Belgium and Luxembourg could be removed from the safe travel list tomorrow, and Croatia could also be at risk. Luxembourg has the highest incidence of coronavirus cases per 100,000 people in Europe

Belgium and Luxembourg could be removed from the safe travel list tomorrow, and Croatia could also be at risk. Luxembourg has the highest incidence of coronavirus cases per 100,000 people in Europe

YOUNGER PEOPLE MAY BE MORE RISK IN SECOND WAVE

Younger people could be at higher risk of developing coronavirus if the predicted second wave hits Britain this winter. This has also been claimed today.

The President of the Royal Society of Medicine warned that the second wave "is almost certain to come this winter" and could be very different from the first.

Professor Roger Kirby's warning comes when Boris Johnson revealed that a second wave could start in just two weeks. Retired surgeon Professor Kirby said this morning on BBC Radio 4: “Winter is coming and almost certainly a second wave of this virus is coming.

"What we saw in 1918 was the virus change, and the second wave was different from the first wave and affected a different group of people – especially younger people."

His theory is based on a similar series of events that took place during the Spanish flu epidemic in the early 20th century and killed 50 million people worldwide.

It broke out in March 1918 and mainly affected the elderly and sick people during the First World War. The pandemic seemed to end in August 1918, but mortality rates rose again between September and November.

Professor Hunter from Oxford University and Professor Pearce from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine added: "If we want to avoid a" November nightmare "and want a relatively" normal "Christmas, an urge to get rid of it gives us the best chance.

Can an elimination be achieved? We believe this is the case – although this would require major changes in the UK government's current thinking. & # 39;

Younger people could be at higher risk of developing coronavirus if the predicted second wave hits Britain this winter. This has also been claimed today.

The President of the Royal Society of Medicine warned that the second wave "is almost certain to come this winter" and could be very different from the first.

Professor Roger Kirby's warning comes when Boris Johnson revealed that a second wave could start in just two weeks.

Retired surgeon Professor Kirby said this morning on BBC Radio 4: “Winter is coming and almost certainly a second wave of this virus is coming.

"What we saw in 1918 was the virus change, and the second wave was different from the first wave and affected a different group of people – especially younger people."

His theory is based on a similar series of events that took place during the Spanish flu epidemic in the early 20th century and killed 50 million people worldwide.

It broke out in March 1918 and mainly affected the elderly and sick people during the First World War. The pandemic seemed to end in August 1918, but mortality rates rose again between September and November.

However, the virus had developed into a new strain that could affect young and healthy people.

Experts now fear that the coronavirus could see a "W curve" similar to that of the Spanish flu – which means that there would be three major deaths.

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