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Coronavirus: Boris Johnson announced on Monday that the UK is under lockdown


Boris Johnson is slated to announce a national lockdown next week after his science advisors told him it was the only way to save Christmas.

Sage committee scientists yesterday presented # 10 dismal numbers showing Covid is spreading "significantly" faster than even their original "worst case scenario" prediction.

Last night, a cabinet source told the Mail that the dramatic move would be announced next week. It was not clear what the new lock would look like, what should be closed, or how long it would last.

However, another source told The Times that all but essential shops and "educational establishments," including kindergartens, schools and universities, would be closed.

The Prime Minister is planning a press conference, possibly on Monday, with the new restrictions set to begin on Wednesday.

The government is now facing a critical weekend to determine the shape of the measures ahead of an announcement.

The Prime Minister and Chancellor Rishi Sunak are said to have tormented themselves over the decision because they fear it would leave the economy in ruins.

But the scientists – backed by Health Secretary Matt Hancock and Senior Secretary Michael Gove – told them that the virus was on track this winter, killing 85,000 people, and that it was too late for something called an "interruption".

They called for a longer national lockdown – similar to the month-long lockdown in France – and said it was the only way to prevent hospitals from running out of beds.

In a clear signal of the deep split in the government on the issue, a cabinet source said those who opposed a lockdown were "unwilling to surrender".

The mail informed that Mr. Johnson's # 10 team is also split. An influential adviser reportedly warned him this week that a national lockdown was "inevitable" – and a delay could hit him back. It came as:

  • Mr Johnson will meet the Heads of State or Government of Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland to work out a "common approach to Christmas".
  • The number of virus patients in the hospital has doubled in the past 14 days, with 10,708 patients treated by the NHS.
  • According to the ONS, 50,000 people were infected with coronavirus every day. Another 274 deaths were reported yesterday.
  • A survey by the anti-lockdown group Recovery found that more than 70 percent of people were more concerned about the effects of the lockdown than they were about catching Covid.

Data from the Office of National Statistics (ONS) estimated that nearly 52,000 people contracted the virus every day, and one in 100 people in the country was infected with Covid-19 a week ago

Data from the Office of National Statistics (ONS) estimated that nearly 52,000 people contracted the virus every day, and one in 100 people in the country was infected with Covid-19 a week ago

Separate data from King & # 39; s College London predicted that around 32,000 cases occur daily in England and that infections are "steadily increasing" and "not getting out of hand".

Separate data from King & # 39; s College London predicted that around 32,000 cases occur daily in England and that infections are "steadily" increasing and "not getting out of hand".

Boris Johnson and Carrie Symonds commend the "absolutely brilliant" NHS staff for saving his life and the maternity team that gave birth to son Wilfred

Boris Johnson and his fiancée Carrie Symonds will commend NHS medics for giving birth to their son Wilfred and for saving the prime minister's life as he battled coronavirus.

On their first TV appearance together, a recording for the Pride of Britain Awards, they will thank the frontline staff on a Sunday program for their “courage and commitment” during the pandemic.

The couple nominated nurses Jenny McGee and Luis Pitarma, two nurses who cared for Mr. Johnson at St. Thomas' Hospital in April, and the maternity team that Wilfred gave birth to later that month.

A senior government source told The Times that no final decision had been taken on the new lockdown measures.

They added: 'The data is really bad.

"We are seeing the coronavirus increase across the country and hospitals are struggling to deal with it. Our position has changed. & # 39;

Details of the lockdown series came after the mail announced how the Prime Minister was warned by scientists – led by Professor Chris Whitty and scientific adviser Sir Patrick Vallance – that all hospitals in England would be full by December 17th, provided that he is not taking any more action.

Andy Street, the mayor of the West Midlands Conservative, said it was clear that further action was needed. He added: "I don't know if this is a national four-week lockdown, but I know the message is very clear: we need to take further action to turn this tide."

Professor Dominic Harrison, Blackburn director of public health at Darwen Council, called for a breaker because tier three households "did not fully comply" with guidelines.

But Recovery's Jon Dobinson said, “The concept of a four-week lockdown to save Christmas is even more cruel and inhumane, which will fuel the growing mental health crisis – all justified by false hopes.

"People are dying by the thousands from lockdowns and restrictions. It's time to focus."

A scientific source working for the government also told the Times that it was now "too late" for the circuit breaker to trip.

They said, “It is definitely too late to believe that a two week breaker alone would fix us. . . It would almost certainly have to take longer. & # 39;

Commenting on the prospect of a new lockdown, Professor Jeremy Farrar, member of the Sage Scientific Advisory Group, said, “To get Covid-19 under control, we must act now. The virus won't wait for us. & # 39;

The infectious disease expert wrote on Twitter: "Nobody wants" a lockdown, myself included. Full and generous support to people and businesses is a key factor in making it work.

"But we quickly broke through the reasonable worst-case scenario. In this phase of the epidemic we are further ahead than many assumed."

Belgium announces new restrictions

Belgium announced stricter restrictions last night, including a six-week closure of non-essential stores, including hairdressers. In addition, the school holidays were extended by an additional week in November.

Prime Minister Alexander de Croo said the country of 11 million would otherwise face a collapse of its health system.

"We are moving towards increased containment with a single goal: to keep health care from creaking under the pressure that is already immense today," he said.

"These are the last chance measures."

De Croo, however, did not order a full rerun of the spring lockdown, despite the fact that Belgium's COVID-19 numbers are the worst in the EU.

“The best time to act was a month ago, but these are very difficult decisions that we would all like to avoid. The second best time is now. & # 39;

Professor Gabriel Scally, a wise member and president of the Epidemiology and Public Health Division of the Royal Society of Medicine, said on Twitter: “It is possible to be very concerned about the mental health effects of the pandemic and the treatment of non-pandemic too its Covid conditions and still believe that stricter measures are the best and most necessary course of action. The more the virus spreads, the less capacity the NHS has.

UCL's wise member Professor Christina Pagel added that another national lockdown was "inevitable". The director of clinical operations research told Sky News: “By and large, Covid is spreading particularly in England and Wales.

"I suspect Wales" cases will fall next week when their outbreak takes place. "But basically it is spreading everywhere and at the moment mainly in tier 1 areas."

When asked if a second national lockdown is worth damaging the economy and people's mental health, she said, "I think this is inevitable, and since it is inevitable, the sooner you do it, I think the faster it's over and the more lives you save. "

Foreign Minister Dominic Raab had previously told BBC Radio 4's Today program that the government had tried to avoid a national lockdown.

He added, “We are always ready for any other action we can take. But I think the most important thing about further action is that we continue on our path to fight the virus. & # 39;

There have also been reports of further Tory infighting, with allegations by senior MPs that the lockdown revolt by Conservative MPs in the northern Red Wall seats was led by “selfish young MPs who are old enough to have nothing to fear” from Covid has been.

A conservative elderly statesman said: “Many of our MPs who won seats on the Red Wall last year and are the most fuss about bans are young and not at risk personally.

"You should think about your constituents in their sixties and who are at much greater risk."

The Senior Tory, who is over 60, has selected four MPs to be the most pronounced – William Wragg, who represents Hazel Grove, Manchester, aged 32; Jake Berry, Rossendale and Darwen, 41; Chris Green, Bolton West, 47; and Dehenna Davison, Bishop Auckland, Jan.

The move comes after Boris Johnson and his fiancée Carrie Symonds praised NHS medics for saving the prime minister's life and giving birth to their son in the fight against coronavirus

The move comes after Boris Johnson and his fiancée Carrie Symonds praised NHS medics for saving the prime minister's life and giving birth to their son in the fight against coronavirus

Percentage change in coronavirus cases across England for the week ended October 25: The five local authorities that have seen the highest increase in infection rates are: Kingston upon Hull City, 92.81 percent; Derby, 91.84 percent; North Somerset, 82.99 percent; Medway, 77.17 percent; and Bath and North East Somerset 69.72 percent

Percentage change in coronavirus cases across England for the week ended October 25: The five local authorities that have seen the highest increase in infection rates are: Kingston upon Hull City, 92.81 percent; Derby, 91.84 percent; North Somerset, 82.99 percent; Medway, 77.17 percent; and Bath and North East Somerset 69.72 percent

Above are the Covid-19 infection rates in the London boroughs for the week ending October 24, according to official figures

Above are the Covid-19 infection rates in the London boroughs for the week ending October 24, according to official figures

Almost 20 NHS trusts in England are already treating more coronavirus patients than at the height of the first wave. This comes from official statistics, which suggest that hospitals across the country may run out of beds before Christmas

Almost 20 NHS trusts in England are already treating more coronavirus patients than at the height of the first wave. This comes from official statistics, which suggest that hospitals across the country may run out of beds before Christmas

SAGE presents estimates of the mean R-rate for the four countries in the United Kingdom. The bars represent various independent estimates, the areas shaded in gray represent the combined numerical range, and the black bars are the combined range rounded to one decimal place

SAGE presents estimates of the mean R-rate for the four countries in the United Kingdom. The bars represent various independent estimates, the areas shaded in gray represent the combined numerical range, and the black bars are the combined range rounded to one decimal place

SAGE's plot of the mean R-rate in different NHS regions of England. The bars represent various independent estimates, the areas shaded in gray represent the combined numerical range, and the black bars are the combined range rounded to one decimal place

SAGE's plot of the mean R-rate in different NHS regions of England. The bars represent various independent estimates, the areas shaded in gray represent the combined numerical range, and the black bars are the combined range rounded to one decimal place

SAGE's illustration of the growth rate of Covid-19 in the regions of the NHS England. The bars represent various independent estimates, the areas shaded in gray represent the combined numerical range, and the black bars are the combined range rounded to one decimal place

SAGE's illustration of the growth rate of Covid-19 in the regions of the NHS England. The bars represent various independent estimates, the areas shaded in gray represent the combined numerical range, and the black bars are the combined range rounded to one decimal place

SAGE's UK mean R-rate plot with bars representing different independent estimates

SAGE's UK mean R-rate plot with bars representing different independent estimates

Act now to save Christmas and call on government scientists to warn Britain of the worst-case scenario unless the country goes into lockdown

By Eleanor Hayward, Xantha Leatham, and Victoria Allen for the Daily Mail

The announcement of the national lockdown is awaited after government scientists said it was necessary to save Christmas.

The experts estimate that there are 1,000 deaths a day in the UK within a month. An additional 274 deaths were reported yesterday, compared with 136 two weeks ago.

There is a delay of about three weeks between infections and deaths. The scientists told ministers that without further restrictions, the death toll will continue to rise exponentially and hospitals will be overwhelmed.

The number of virus patients in the hospital has doubled in the past 14 days. Currently 10,708 are being treated by the NHS.

Scientists have warned that the second wave of coronavirus could result in 85,000 deaths, almost twice as many as victims of the first epidemic

Rishi Sunak's Eat Out to Help Out program resulted in a surge in coronavirus cases

According to a study, Rishi Sunak's Eat Out to Help Out program caused a significant increase in coronavirus cases.

Up to 17 percent of the summer cases were linked to the deal, as diners rushed to restaurants in August to get 50 percent off their bill.

A study by Warwick University looked at the number of visitors to the restaurants participating in the program in more than 6,000 areas in England. Then the number of clusters in which three or more were infected was analyzed.

More people tested positive in areas where large numbers of meals were claimed by the deal.

The study, which suggests the program caused crowds to be too close together, concluded that it accounted for an additional 8 to 17 percent of infections in August and early September.

Cases apparently rose within a week of starting Eat Out to Help Out and began to decrease a fortnight after it ended.

Dr. Thiemo Fetzer, who contributed to the study that has not yet been published in a journal, blamed the deal for accelerating the second wave. The Finance Ministry said: "Many European colleagues have seen increases in certain cases – regardless of whether similar measures have been put in place."

If this path of doubling every two weeks continues, there will be more than 20,000 hospitalized patients by mid-November, more than at the height of the first wave.

The number of coronavirus infections is currently four times higher than expected in the government's plan for the "worst-case scenario", according to which the daily infections in October are estimated at around 12,000.

With this, the country is on the right track to surpass the previous worst-case scenario of 85,000 Covid-19 deaths this winter.

The new national lockdown comes after the government's Emergency Scientific Advisory Group (Sage) called for urgent national action, including the closure of all bars and restaurants, as well as other places where households mix indoors.

They believe ministers left it "too late" for a two-week "breaker" lockout – which they called for in September – to work.

Instead, they called for a longer national lockdown, similar to the month-long lockdown imposed yesterday in France.

They argued that this was the best option to bring the R-rate below 1 and prevent the hospital capacity from becoming overwhelmed.

If new measures were put in place quickly, the restrictions could potentially be lifted in time for Christmas so that people can reunite with loved ones during the Christmas season.

A senior official said: "Time marches on, we are two months before Christmas. The more the numbers go up, the harder it is to turn them around."

On Tuesday, it emerged that ministers had been asked to prepare for 85,000 deaths this winter, with 500 deaths a day and more than 300,000 hospitalized for at least three months.

But government scientists said yesterday that this "reasonable worst-case scenario" has already been violated.

The planning document had estimated there would be 100 deaths a day by the end of October, but the UK has already seen triple that amount on a few days this week.

In a newly released document from a Sage meeting on October 7th, scientists said, “In England we are violating the number of infections and hospital admissions in the reasonable worst-case scenario

& # 39; It is also very likely that the death rate will exceed the worst-case scenario within the next two weeks.

"If the number of infections declined in the near future, this excess of the reasonable worst-case scenario could be modest and short-lived. However, if R stays above 1, the epidemic will continue to deviate from the planning scenario."

Another recent statement by Sage, dated Oct. 14, said: "The number of daily deaths is now in line with the most reasonable worst-case scenario and will almost certainly exceed it within the next two weeks."

The documents also show that scientists have been calling for bars and restaurants to be closed for "anything but take-away" for weeks. An Oct. 7 document produced by SPI-M-O, a subgroup reporting to Sage, said there was "strong evidence" that they were closed to slow the growth of the epidemic.

What is the infection rate in YOUR city? The interactive module shows how fast Covid-19 outbreaks are increasing across England as official data shows cases are increasing fastest in Hull, Derby and Somerset

By Vanessa Chalmers, health reporter at MailOnline

According to official data that MailOnline has turned into an interactive tool to show how quickly cases are occurring in your city, Covid-19 outbreaks are growing fastest in Hull, Derby and Bath.

Hull and Derby saw their coronavirus epidemics almost double in the seven-day period ending October 25. The 7-day infection rate rose to 279 and 329 cases per 100,000 people, respectively.

Both cities, along with the rest of Staffordshire and Derbyshire, will move from Tier 1 to Tier 2 from Saturday to curb the surge in infections. This was announced yesterday as England moved one step closer to full national lockdown.

However, most of the authorities where epidemics have increased the most are still in the first tier, where only the 6pm and 10pm curfew only applies. Scientists have argued that these rules are not strict enough to reduce the outbreak. Top government advisors warn that current growth is "very bleak".

For example, North Somerset and Bath, as well as North East Somerset, where cases have increased 83 percent and 70 percent in a week, are not yet affected by tighter virus-fighting restrictions. Despite the warnings, the coronavirus crisis is "accelerating" in the south of the country.

Public Health England's weekly surveillance report found that only 20 out of 150 authorities in England saw a decrease in infections last week, including Nottingham, where cases have decreased by 30 percent. Despite the city's shrinking outbreak, it will be placed under the toughest Tier 3 restrictions starting tomorrow along with the rest of the county.

And the data provided more evidence that the toughest lockdown measures work. Liverpool, Knowsley, Sefton and St. Helens are all seeing drops in their weekly coronavirus infection rates. The entire Merseyside area has been closed since October 14th.

It suggests that the brutal restrictions prohibiting people from being in contact with anyone outside of their own household, and imposing the closure of many pubs, bars, and in some cases gyms, are starting to work. However, scientists say that the real effects of the measure only become clear after a few weeks.

Boris Johnson is again being pressured by his doctors to impose a nationwide shutdown before and after Christmas so families can gather together over the holidays. Dominic Raab hinted today that No10 could introduce a new set of even stricter Level 4 restrictions and declined to rule out a national lockdown.

It was announced yesterday that another 16 authorities will be drawn into the second stage from Saturday. Some of them were among the 20 places where the outbreaks have worsened significantly, according to Public Health England (PHE) data.

PHE data is based on the number of positive smears in the week of October 19-25. The new infections can be divided by the population size for each area to get a fall rate per 100,000 people. This allows numbers to be compared accurately between different areas.

For example, in Kingston upon Hull, 279 new cases per 100,000 people were diagnosed over that seven day period. In the previous week there were 145, which corresponds to an increase of 93 percent.

Similarly, the infection rate in Derby City rose 92 percent from 171 to 328 cases per 100,000. This suggests that the outbreak is doubling every seven days in these locations.

However, more tests may have been requested in both areas to help contain the virus. So if you just look at growth, you may not get the full picture. Health Department statistics according to which puncture tests carried out by local authorities are only valid until October 21, which means it is impossible to say exactly how much the numbers were skewed by smears during those fortnight.

Earlier this week, Derby's health director Dr. Robyn Dewis is urging all of the city's 259,000 residents to adhere to Tier 2 restrictions.

The council was waiting to be promoted to the higher level, which the ministers confirmed last night. Amber Valley, Bolsover, Derbyshire Dales, Derby City, South Derbyshire and the entire High Peak will move to the second stage starting Saturday.

Dr. Dewis told MailOnline: “I never look forward to asking our residents to place restrictions on their daily lives, but I feel it is imperative that we take action to reduce the spread of the virus.

“We have seen rapid growth across the city, with all stations affected. What is important is that we are now seeing a significant increase in those over 60 who are infected. & # 39;

Outbreaks also increased sharply in North Somerset (83 percent more) and Bath and North East Somerset (70 percent more).

However, their infection rates of 130.2 and 191 are currently well below the UK average (230 per 100,000). This could explain why they are staying on medium Tier 1 alert.

Matt Lenny, director of public health at North Somerset Council, said in a statement: “Analysis of the latest case data also shows that there is no clear pattern of infection in local communities.

& # 39; The case data shows us that the virus is widespread in our community and we are only seeing higher rates of infection in younger people.

“I urge every North Somerset resident to make the right decisions as they go about their daily lives.

“We are at a critical point as cases are increasing and people are mingling and spending more time indoors. We should all pretend we already have the virus and change our behavior to reduce the spread. & # 39;

While locations in Somerset, England are not considered Covid-19 hotspots, they can if action is not taken sooner rather than later to slow the spread of growth.

Where has the infection rate increased the most?

Kingston upon Hull, town with 92.81%

Derby 91.84%

North Somerset 82.99%

Medway 77.17%

Bath and North East Somerset 69.72%

South Gloucestershire 62.13%

Herefordshire, county of 58.10%

Derbyshire 57.98%

Stoke-on-Trent 56.79%

Lincolnshire 55.26%

Staffordshire 55.21%

Leicestershire 54.29%

Southampton 54.02%

Brighton and Hove 52.57%

Milton Keynes 50.88%

Swindon 49.99%

East Riding of Yorkshire 49.32%

Dudley 49.07%

West Sussex 46.89%

Leicester 46.57%

Where has the infection rate increased the least?

Nottingham -30.00%

Liverpool -20.98%

York -20.25%

Windsor and Maidenhead -20.09%

Knowsley -18.18%

County Durham -15.51%

Sefton -12.54%

Rutland -11.63%

Devonian -11.12%

Camden -10.03%

Halton -7.95%

South Tyneside -5.35%

Hackney and City of London -4.60%

Richmond upon Thames -3.96%

St. Helens -3.80%

Hartlepool -3.68%

Slough -3.02%

Sheffield -2.46%

Leeds -1.22%

Newcastle upon Tyne -0.42%

Experts have previously said that the rate at which an outbreak is growing – rather than its current size – is the most important factor when considering the severity of the situation in a given area.

Ministers are expected to analyze a "basket" of indicators to help make decisions about Covid-19 restrictions, including the rate of infection, hospital admissions and the rate of growth.

In South Gloucestershire in the southwest and Herefordshire in the West Midlands, outbreaks also increased rapidly by around 60 percent in a week. However, their infection rates are also below the national average and are currently 192 and 86, respectively.

The figures show that the "second wave" is now affecting every corner of England, not just the north.

Scientists warned this week that infections are "getting faster" in the south.

A worrying government-funded study by Imperial College London found that the outbreak appears to be fastest in London and the south-west, where rules are comparatively lax, and slowest in the northern regions with the most stringent restrictions.

They predicted that the R-rate – the average number of people infected by each carrier – is also higher than two in the Southeast, East, and Southwest, which have mostly escaped tough local lockdowns.

But the R-rate in the capital is three higher than anywhere else in England. For comparison, the experts stated that the national R-rate is 1.6. Cases double every three days compared to every nine days in the rest of England, the study said.

The PHE data shows that only 20 out of 149 councils saw their Covid-19 infection rates decline in the week ending October 25. For comparison: 23 recorded a decline the week before.

In some major cities, infection rates fell in the week leading up to October 25th. These include Nottingham (minus 30 percent), Liverpool (minus 21 percent), Sheffield (minus 2.46 percent) and Leeds (minus 1.22 percent). .

Even so, Nottingham and Leeds will come under tier three restrictions this weekend. And there is no clear path for Liverpool and Sheffield to get out of their local "locks".

Liverpool and the rest of Merseyside, including Halton, Knowsley, Sefton, St. Helens and Wirral, went straight to the third stage when the tiered system went into effect on October 14th. In all of these places, infection rates have dropped in the past week, with the exception of Wirral, where cases only rose 6 percent.

A number of locations under Tier 2 have also seen decreases in infection rates, including York (20 percent), South Tyneside (5 percent), and Newcastle upon Tyne (a slight minus 0.42 percent).

Parts of London – Camden (down 10 percent), Hackney and City of London (down 4.60 percent), and Richmond upon Thames (down 3.96 percent) – also saw improvements in infection rates. These areas have some of the highest infection rates in London, suggesting residents may have controlled the coronavirus.

Londoners are currently banned from meeting anyone indoors with whom they do not live together.

However, London Mayor Sadiq Khan is putting pressure on number 10 to move the city to Stage Three, although infection rates vary across 32 different boroughs – from 223 positive tests per 100,000 residents in Ealing in the last week to 103 per 100,000 in Lewisham.

Martin McKee, Professor of European Public Health at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and a member of Independent Sage, said: “Unfortunately we have allowed the infection to get out of hand and as a result we have to change this around or it will just keep going rise, more will become seriously ill and more people will die.

“The sooner we impose stricter restrictions, the better. I see MEPs saying, "The prices in my region are low, so we shouldn't do anything". It's not about whether the fall is low, it's about whether they are increasing rapidly.

“We saw very clearly in March that it was better sooner than later. We really should do this now, we really have no time to waste. & # 39;

However, Professor McKee stressed that with stricter restrictions, three essential things are required – curbing indoor social mixing, where the virus can easily spread, mental health support, and a functioning testing and tracking system. At present, the British NHS Test and Trace does not achieve the promised "world hit" status.

Professor McKee added, “As long as infections are increasing, we have a big problem. Simply because of the nature of exponential growth. It's a simple nature of math. Even if the infections increase only slightly, the rate of growth increases faster.

“On the other hand, if we can take really tough measures to keep people from mingling with one another, there can be a sharp decline in a relatively short amount of time.

Professor Paul Hunter, an expert on infectious diseases at the University of East Anglia, said, “The Tier One restrictions are clearly not working to suppress the epidemic. I suspect the government would decide to increase in most regions of the country and move into stage two at least next month. And some of the current tier two will switch to tier three.

“The interesting thing is that things are not going as fast as they used to be in the northern cities. And in some of these cities like Liverpool it already seems to be in a bit of a decline.

“I think it's a little early to say if these Level 2 / Tier 3 levels aren't working. The bottom line is that the higher restrictions might work, but it's too early to be sure.

“In the rural areas of the southern small town, many of the current increases are currently taking place. It is very evident that the cases in the south are now increasing. Almost everywhere in between is on the rise.

"The question is, when do they decide that this is no longer acceptable or tolerable and then increase the restrictions in those areas."

Simon Clarke, Associate Professor of Cell Microbiology at the University of Reading, said, “Are local restrictions sufficient? They should be, but the problem is not tier two to three as much as one to two. We know in certain parts of the country that this is not happening quickly enough.

“My gut feeling is that we are heading for tightening restrictions by the New Year. I think it will be something like tier three or maybe closer. I think we're going to add a level 4. But it's just a guess. & # 39;

How have infection rates changed in your area?
Name of the local authority September 21-27 September 28th to October 4th change October 5th to 11th change October 12th to 18th change October 19-25 change
Bark and Dagenham 62 63.41 39.18% 98.17 54.82% 119.3 21.52% 131.51 10.23%
Barnet 43.2 86.39 267.77% 110.64 28.07% 114.68 3.65% 140.7 22.69%
Barnsley 76.56 148.66 336.85% 279.91 88.29% 457.33 63.38% 499.06 9.12%
Bath and North East Somerset 37.25 67.78 367.77% 120.03 77.09% 112.79 -6.03% 191.43 69.72%
Bedford 47.9 74.44 138.90% 81.37 9.31% 87.14 7.09% 88.29 1.32%
Bexley 28.19 56.39 141.40% 66.05 17.13% 82.97 25.62% 113.58 36.89%
Birmingham 147.92 159.31 28.64% 190.92 19.84% 227.36 19.09% 257.75 13.37%
Blackburn with Darwen 182.37 257.86 30.41% 446.24 73.06% 576.5 29.19% 774.24 34.30%
Blackpool 91.79 197.21 169.60% 288.28 46.18% 424.54 47.27% 425.97 0.34%
Bolton 244.13 265 9.80% 335.25 26.51% 442.01 31.84% 546.34 23.60%
Bournemouth, Christchurch and Poole 25.55 74.12 252.95% 134.57 81.56% 144.44 7.33% 184.91 28.02%
Bracknell Forest 25.3 40.8 212.40% 53.04 30.00% 81.6 53.85% 84.86 4.00%
Bradford 184.34 293.27 98.37% 335.14 14.28% 395.72 18.08% 481.13 21.58%
Brent 50.64 79.45 181.74% 99.16 24.81% 98.55 -0.62% 113.41 15.08%
Brighton and Hove 21.66 62.22 448.68% 82.51 32.61% 93.51 13.33% 142.67 52.57%
Bristol, city of 28.27 66.47 275.54% 156.46 135.38% 245.37 56.83% 333.64 35.97%
Bromley 27.68 55.67 242.58% 70.11 25.94% 89.97 28.33% 108.93 21.07%
Buckinghamshire 24.82 48.35 182.75% 88.98 84.03% 86.77 -2.48% 104.6 20.55%
To bury 216.24 290.59 52.89% 389.55 34.05% 430.39 10.48% 526.21 22.26%
Calderdale 97.42 173.56 135.27% 242.6 39.78% 311.65 28.46% 410.49 31.72%
Cambridgeshire 06/18 45.29 355.18% 65.34 44.27% 67.48 3.28% 82.17 21.77%
Camden 27.4 55.55 138.11% 111.84 101.33% 121.84 8.94% 109.62 -10.03%
Central Bedfordshire 23.56 37.76 67.67% 51.27 35.78% 61.67 20.28% 71.37 15.73%
Cheshire East 61.17 141.35 287.90% 168.68 19.33% 173.11 2.63% 215.8 24.66%
Cheshire West and Chester 78.12 143.7 220.12% 191.21 33.06% 199.08 4.12% 214.53 7.76%
Cornwall and Isles of Scilly 40.4 26.58 32.17% 32 20.39% 30.78 -3.81% 44.95 46.04%
County Durham 110.55 201.29 209.30% 338.05 67.94% 329.56 -2.51% 278.44 -15.51%
Coventry 74.56 108.2 95.13% 166.34 53.73% 184.11 10.68% 199.99 8.63%
Croydon 32.58 66.46 307.98% 75.25 13.23% 79.39 5.50% 105.76 33.22%
Cumbria 51.2 86.6 252.03% 121.6 40.42% 152.4 25.33% 170.2 11.68%
Darlington 103.93 176.03 358.53% 206.92 17.55% 286.51 38.46% 296.81 3.59%
Derby 43.14 82.78 124.21% 134.08 61.97% 171.39 27.83% 328.8 91.84%
Derbyshire 44.35 93.44 201.23% 144.51 54.66% 186.5 29.06% 294.63 57.98%
Devon 18.82 84.37 957.27% 105.69 25.27% 78.52 -25.71% 69.79 -11.12%
Doncaster 62.84 147.81 177.73% 220.27 49.02% 350.76 59.24% 513.64 46.44%
Dorset 11.36 25.1 352.25% 60.76 142.07% 72.39 19.14% 103.3 42.70%
Dudley 56.28 79.29 90.28% 102.3 29.02% 150.81 47.42% 224.82 49.07%
Ealing 55.29 98.01 248.91% 139.85 42.69% 162.08 15.90% 212.4 31.05%
East Riding of Yorkshire 49.83 109.33 372.06% 133.36 21.98% 172.35 29.24% 257.35 49.32%
East Sussex 14.72 30.51 359.49% 44.86 47.03% 50.43 12.42% 58.32 15.65%
Enfield 42.54 72.8 158.52% 93.77 28.80% 137.21 46.33% 138.41 0.87%
Essex 26.66 48.35 176.92% 69.97 44.72% 90.25 28.98% 99.05 9.75%
Gateshead 162.33 241.02 83.08% 255.38 5.96% 259.34 1.55% 355.84 37.21%
Gloucestershire 19.62 40.5 200.00% 62 53.09% 62.63 1.02% 68.6 9.53%
Greenwich 36.47 50.7 217.27% 75.36 48.64% 85.43 13.36% 92.73 8.55%
Hackney and City of London 55.36 101.77 311.03% 132.37 30.07% 164.35 24.16% 156.79 -4.60%
Wait 265.82 343.1 80.49% 387.91 13.06% 340 -12.35% 312.96 -7.95%
Hammersmith and Fulham 45.91 75.08 238.96% 115.59 53.96% 163.12 41.12% 190.12 16.55%
Hampshire 16.78 08/35 219.20% 55.48 58.15% 68.35 23.20% 94.32 38.00%
Haringey 40.95 89.34 192.73% 116.88 30.83% 126.93 8.60% 142.57 12.32%
harrow 42.2 95.95 244.28% 116.26 21.17% 127.81 9.93% 133.78 4.67%
Hartlepool 153.74 250.9 213.35% 274.39 9.36% 348.06 26.85% 335.24 -3.68%
Havering 58.18 60.49 80.46% 100.56 66.24% 126.76 26.05% 148.72 17.32%
Herefordshire, county 12.97 22.3 152.83% 37.86 69.78% 54.46 43.85% 86.1 58.10%
Hertfordshire 30.94 66.83 166.79% 87.35 30.70% 90.79 3.94% 106.68 17.50%
Hillingdon 57.35 75.28 117.95% 102.32 35.92% 135.24 32.17% 160 18.31%
Hounslow 57.82 81.39 166.24% 105.7 29.87% 139.21 31.70% 177.15 27.25%
Isle of Wight 11.29 12.7 259.77% 17.63 38.82% 24.69 40.05% 04/31 25.72%
Islington 42.89 76.3 198.40% 90.32 18.37% 121.25 34.24% 126.62 4.43%
Kensington and Chelsea 24.34 81.34 262.80% 94.15 15.75% 135.14 43.54% 138.99 2.85%
Kent 16.44 34.46 240.51% 50.46 46.43% 54.25 7.51% 75.24 38.69%
Kingston upon Hull, city of 35.41 95.85 555.16% 107.01 11.64% 144.74 35.26% 279.08 92.81%
Kingston upon Thames 33.24 72.11 255.57% 101.97 41.41% 144.78 41.98% 184.22 27.24%
Kirklees 118.92 192.37 106.85% 254.44 32.27% 300.37 18.05% 388.82 29.45%
Knowsley 335.41 602.54 182.30% 700.64 16.28% 663.52 -5.30% 542.88 -18.18%
Lambeth 41.71 77.6 272.00% 92.94 19.77% 122.38 31.68% 137.1 12.03%
Lancashire 160.6 246.02 139.88% 347.6 41.29% 387.44 11.46% 426.22 10.01%
Leeds 170.46 379.13 239.39% 394.63 4.09% 393.5 -0.29% 388.71 -1.22%
Leicester 111.51 140.31 23.94% 184.06 31.18% 222.46 20.86% 326.06 46.57%
Leicestershire 51.12 92.19 124.47% 161.58 75.27% 176.87 9.46% 272.89 54.29%
Lewisham 34 64.09 206.21% 77.16 20.39% 79.13 2.55% 90.57 14.46%
Lincolnshire 27.85 63.19 238.82% 92.61 46.56% 103.65 11.92% 160.93 55.26%
Liverpool 342.94 580.27 186.43% 681.47 17.44% 584.69 -14.20% 462.01 -20.98%
Luton 61.96 72.28 41.28% 89.65 24.03% 141.28 57.59% 150.2 6.31%
Manchester 307.67 558.19 215.22% 474.62 -14.97% 438.99 -7.51% 486.2 10.75%
Medway 17:59 30.87 177.36% 38.77 25.59% 45.59 17.59% 80.77 77.17%
Merton 26.63 47.93 266.72% 77.95 62.63% 95.38 22.36% 134.11 40.61%
Middlesbrough 136.19 259.61 375.30% 280.89 8.20% 351.82 25.25% 353.95 0.61%
Milton Keynes 24.86 45.28 139.20% 65.69 45.08% 63.46 -3.39% 95.75 50.88%
Newcastle upon Tyne 299.19 492.37 204.91% 466.94 -5.16% 313.39 -32.88% 312.07 -0.42%
Newham 66.26 75.04 100.75% 103.36 37.74% 129.41 25.20% 142.16 9.85%
Norfolk 17.3 38.01 228.52% 50.89 33.89% 63.89 25.55% 84.71 32.59%
North East Lincolnshire 35.1 76.46 481.00% 162.32 112.29% 237.52 46.33% 339.68 43.01%
North Lincolnshire 47.59 94.03 224.02% 151.49 61.11% 170.06 12.26% 191.54 12.63%
North Somerset 27.9 39.99 56.33% 54.87 37.21% 71.15 29.67% 130.2 82.99%
North Tyneside 156.32 232.31 137.93% 251.55 8.28% 210.67 -16.25% 279.44 32.64%
North Yorkshire 67.47 113.1 188.82% 134.29 18.74% 141.09 5.06% 164.39 16.51%
Northamptonshire 24.43 60.14 198.02% 96.25 60.04% 107.53 11.72% 127.31 18.39%
Northumberland 171.2 180.19 114.38% 175.54 -2.58% 176.47 0.53% 179.88 1.93%
Nottingham 94.32 609.79 1523.94% 927.91 52.17% 610.69 -34.19% 427.46 -30.00%
Nottinghamshire 49.74 137.04 387.17% 220.47 60.88% 272.27 23.50% 325.03 19.38%
Oldham 193.58 295.64 62.27% 382.52 29.39% 468.56 22.49% 661.72 41.22%
Oxfordshire 25.59 64.48 309.14% 86.31 33.86% 89.35 3.52% 111.9 25.24%
Peterborough 35.1 62.3 223.13% 81.58 30.95% 95.92 17.58% 125.09 30.41%
Plymouth 23.27 37.77 80.03% 68.68 81.84% 103.01 49.99% 141.55 37.41%
Portsmouth 32.11 50.72 194.54% 104.7 106.43% 144.25 37.77% 163.79 13.55%
read 29.67 43.89 343.78% 74.79 70.40% 95.81 28.11% 109.41 14.19%
Redbridge 73.06 110.74 78.84% 125.15 13.01% 136.95 9.43% 168.4 22.96%
Redcar and Cleveland 70.73 173.53 395.80% 210.72 21.43% 280.71 33.21% 323 15.07%
Richmond upon Thames 39.39 108.58 593.36% 144.94 33.49% 153.02 5.57% 146.96 -3.96%
Rochdale 202.78 335.41 126.06% 429.83 28.15% 508.97 18.41% 574.16 12.81%
Rotherham 100.98 203.08 228.66% 279.57 37.66% 386.19 38.14% 493.2 27.71%
Rutland 42.58 85.16 580.19% 132.74 55.87% 107.7 -18.86% 95.17 -11.63%
Salford 195.49 317.19 114.36% 390.21 23.02% 495.3 26.93% 588.79 18.88%
Sandwell 113.26 114.78 19.67% 146.45 27.59% 216.17 47.61% 275.23 27.32%
Sefton 226.84 371.19 194.83% 477.19 28.56% 438.48 -8.11% 383.49 -12.54%
Sheffield 121.74 385.74 519.76% 455.16 18.00% 431.05 -5.30% 420.45 -2.46%
Shropshire 42.4 59.11 193.79% 86.34 46.07% 84.48 -2.15% 119.45 41.39%
swamp 82.92 86.93 217.03% 92.28 6.15% 155.14 68.12% 150.46 -3.02%
Solihull 90.12 119.7 61.87% 174.7 45.95% 209.36 19.84% 223.69 6.84%
Somerset 13.87 32.9 362.73% 39.13 18.94% 45.89 17.28% 61.36 33.71%
South Gloucestershire 24.2 58.58 255.25% 88.04 50.29% 118.56 34.67% 192.22 62.13%
South Tyneside 221.89 274.88 37.42% 245.07 -10.84% 235.14 -4.05% 222.55 -5.35%
Southampton 19.01 42.77 199.93% 60.19 40.73% 74.05 23.03% 114.05 54.02%
Southend-on-Sea 31.13 42.59 143.79% 48.05 12.82% 68.81 43.20% 82.46 19.84%
Southwark 47.99 60.53 114.42% 79.35 31.09% 95.66 20.55% 121.69 27.21%
St. Helens 254.17 347.76 167.24% 443.56 27.55% 437.47 -1.37% 420.85 -3.80%
Staffordshire 38.66 82.2 173.82% 121.2 47.45% 169.06 39.49% 262.4 55.21%
Stockport 110.42 227.32 162.62% 297.18 30.73% 299.91 0.92% 396.02 32.05%
Stockton-on-teas 100.84 233.6 339.02% 342.54 46.64% 357.24 4.29% 447.43 25.25%
Stoke-on-Trent 49.54 60.46 54.99% 118.19 95.48% 192.3 62.70% 301.51 56.79%
Suffolk 8.41 33.49 298.22% 46.37 38.46% 55.03 18.68% 72.63 31.98%
Sunderland 215.7 296.72 108.61% 299.24 0.85% 321.92 7.58% 323.72 0.56%
Surrey 08/27 66.29 350.65% 83.01 25.22% 94.8 14.20% 106.58 12.43%
Sutton 23.75 36.83 162.14% 81.9 122.37% 90.14 10.06% 114.85 27.41%
Swindon 19.35 27.9 181.82% 45.46 62.94% 69.31 52.46% 103.96 49.99%
Tameside 174.4 245.48 74.84% 322.75 31.48% 371.31 15.05% 513.92 38.41%
Telford and Wrekin 43.92 56.16 173.02% 81.73 45.53% 154.01 88.44% 211.28 37.19%
Thurrock 24.09 43.02 226.16% 75.14 74.66% 122.17 62.59% 157.74 29.12%
Torbay 14.68 49.9 466.40% 82.19 64.71% 100.54 22.33% 126.23 25.55%
Tower hamlet 62.51 85.61 164.80% 97.92 14.38% 133.64 36.48% 148.73 11.29%
Trafford 139.88 279.75 277.28% 336.63 20.33% 327.36 -2.75% 429.74 31.27%
Wakefield 86.13 163.93 243.96% 238.87 45.71% 310.64 30.05% 401.08 29.11%
Walsall 83.37 122.25 81.76% 168.84 38.11% 211.57 25.31% 305.8 44.54%
Waltham Forest 47.3 79.43 147.21% 94.95 19.54% 102.53 7.98% 135.75 32.40%
Wandsworth 37.92 71.89 243.48% 101.31 40.92% 114.35 12.87% 143.78 25.74%
Warrington 197.61 268.55 102.15% 337.6 25.71% 348.55 3.24% 406.64 16.67%
Warwickshire 40.49 70.94 98.05% 101.05 42.44% 126.14 24.83% 166.63 32.10%
West Berkshire 22.72 39.13 181.92% 49.23 25.81% 57.43 16.66% 83.94 46.16%
West Sussex 21.64 33.1 148.69% 43.06 30.09% 50.35 16.93% 73.96 46.89%
Westminster 08/29 71.18 220.63% 88.02 23.66% 108.3 23.04% 135.08 24.73%
Wigan 160.04 274.45 124.39% 407.71 48.56% 460.66 12.99% 655.99 42.40%
Wiltshire 15.2 32.8 221.57% 53.8 64.02% 68 26.39% 84.2 23.82%
Windsor and Maidenhead 31.7 80.57 335.75% 113.59 40.98% 141.33 24.42% 112.93 -20.09%
Weird 193.82 252.77 61.86% 315.42 24.79% 267.27 -15.27% 282.71 5.78%
Wokingham 28.64 45 327.76% 61.36 36.36% 76.55 24.76% 95.26 24.44%
Wolverhampton 83.16 75.94 21.21% 133.66 76.01% 191 42.90% 246.43 29.02%
Worcestershire 43.47 70.83 232.22% 93.15 31.51% 105.24 12.98% 128.4 22.01%
York 72.64 195.14 341.89% 266.36 36.50% 307.19 15.33% 244.99 -20.25%

Tägliche Covid-19-Fälle stiegen letzte Woche in England um 50% und 1 von 100 Menschen wurde vor einer Woche infiziert, schätzt ONS – aber der Ausbruch einer separaten Studie behauptet, der Ausbruch sei "stetig".

Von Sam Blanchard, Senior Health Reporter bei MailOnline

Die täglichen Coronavirus-Infektionen in England stiegen letzte Woche um 50 Prozent, da laut einer von der Regierung durchgeführten Überwachungsstudie täglich fast 52.000 Menschen an dem Virus erkrankten.

Daten des Amtes für nationale Statistiken warnten, dass einer von 100 Menschen im Land vor einer Woche mit Covid-19 infiziert war, was die Agentur dazu veranlasste, zu sagen, dass die Fälle "stark zunehmen". Schätzungen, die heute veröffentlicht wurden, haben gezeigt, dass sich die Zahl der Menschen, die sich mit dem Virus infiziert haben, innerhalb von 14 Tagen fast verdoppelt hat und in dem am 23. Oktober endenden siebentägigen Zeitraum mehr als 568.000 Menschen gleichzeitig infiziert waren.

The report forecast that 51,900 people caught Covid-19 every day in England last week, up from 35,200 a day the week before and 27,900 the week before.

ONS experts warned that the number of infections continues to rise, adding: There has been growth in all age groups in the past two weeks. older teenagers and young adults continue to have the highest current rates, while rates appear to be increasing sharply among secondary school students. & # 39;

Andere Forscher am King's College London sagten jedoch voraus, dass in England täglich rund 32.000 neue symptomatische Fälle auftreten, und behaupteten, dass die Infektionen "stetig" zunehmen und "nicht außer Kontrolle geraten". Professor Tim Spector, der Epidemiologe hinter der Studie des Königs, sagte, die Verbreitung von Covid-19 sei derzeit "stetig" und könnte sich in Schottland sogar verlangsamen. Das Team schätzte, dass sich die Fälle in Großbritannien einmal im Monat verdoppeln.

SAGE-Aktualisierungen der geschätzten Reproduktionsrate (R) des Coronavirus zeigten heute, dass das R seit letzter Woche in Großbritannien und England von einem möglichen Bereich von 1,2-1,4 auf 1,1-1,3 gefallen zu sein scheint. Das projizierte R – von dem bekannt ist, dass es auf Daten basiert, die zwei bis drei Wochen alt sind – fiel in drei Regionen, blieb in drei Regionen stabil und stieg nur in einer – den Midlands. Trotz des Hoffnungsschimmers sagte das Beratungsgremium von No10, es sei "fast sicher, dass die Epidemie im ganzen Land weiterhin rasant zunimmt".

Die Aktualisierungen kommen nach einer schockierenden Massenteststudie, die gestern veröffentlicht wurde und schätzungsweise 96.000 Menschen jeden Tag am 25. Oktober in England an der Krankheit erkrankte. Academics at Imperial College London – whose projection was based on thousands of random test results – warned that the R-rate in London could be as high as three.

That report, which put even more pressure on Boris Johnson to take action to avoid another full blown crisis, came with a contradicting forecast that approached the number to 56,000 and caused confusion over how severe the UK's second wave actually is . Tests des Gesundheitsministeriums haben in der letzten Woche durchschnittlich nur 22.125 Fälle pro Tag festgestellt, wobei gestern 23.065 diagnostiziert wurden.

Looking back at the number of people dying can also give an idea of ​​how far Covid-19 is spreading. Government officials estimate that 0.5 percent of coronavirus patients die, suggesting an average of 154 people died per week by October 23, which was the result of 31,000 new daily infections earlier in the month.

Professor Spector said King's college team, working with health tech company ZOE, wanted to "reassure" people that the situation didn't seem as bad as "other polls" suggested .

Laut SAGE ist die Reproduktionsrate in Großbritannien – die durchschnittliche Anzahl der mit Covid-19 infizierten Patienten – in der zweiten Woche in Folge auf 1,1 bis 1,3 gesunken. Dies bleibt jedoch weiterhin über 1, was darauf hinweist, dass der Ausbruch des Landes immer noch zunimmt.

In other coronavirus news:

  • Dominic Raab hinted that the government could introduce a new set of even tougher level 4 coronavirus restrictions as he refused to rule out a national lockdown.
  • West Yorkshire will enter the strictest third tier lockdown starting Sunday, joining the regions around Liverpool, Manchester and Nottingham.
  • According to sources close to the city's mayor, Sadiq Khan, London could face Tier 3 rules in a matter of weeks. Mr Khan yesterday reiterated his calls for a national shutdown, saying that tougher measures need to be taken;
  • A government source has reportedly told Boris Johnson that all hospital beds in England could be full by December 17th if further action against the coronavirus is not taken. However, stricter measures continue to be in place and Nightingale hospitals across the country remain on standby.
  • A study found that a variant strain of Covid-19 called 20A.EU1 caused 90 percent of infections in England and was traced back to a farm in northern Spain in June.

SAGE this week estimated that R-rates in the UK and England have fallen since last week - to 1.1 to 1.3, from 1.2 to 1.4 a week earlier. Regional R-rates fell in three places - the northwest, southeast, and southwest, while in other countries they remained stable and only rose in the Midlands, where they rose from 1.1-1.3 to 1.2-1.4

SAGE this week estimated that R-rates in the UK and England have fallen since last week – to 1.1 to 1.3, from 1.2 to 1.4 a week earlier. Regional R-rates fell in three places – the northwest, southeast, and southwest, while in other countries they remained stable and only rose in the Midlands, where they rose from 1.1-1.3 to 1.2-1.4

COVID OUTBREAKS Grow Fastest in Derby, Hull, and Bath

Covid-19 outbreaks are increasing fastest in Hull, Derby and Bath. According to official data, only 20 of the 150 authorities in England saw a decrease in infections last week.

Hull and Derby saw their coronavirus epidemics almost double in the seven-day period ending October 25. The 7-day infection rate rose to 279 and 329 cases per 100,000 people, respectively.

Both cities, along with the rest of Staffordshire and Derbyshire, will move from Tier 1 to Tier 2 from Saturday to curb the surge in infections. This was announced yesterday as England moved one step closer to full national lockdown.

However, most of the authorities where epidemics have increased the most are still in the first tier, where only the 6pm and 10pm curfew only applies. Scientists have argued that these rules are not strict enough to reduce the outbreak. Top government advisors warn that current growth is "very bleak".

For example, North Somerset and Bath, as well as North East Somerset, where cases have increased 83 percent and 70 percent in a week, are not yet affected by tighter virus-fighting restrictions. Despite the warnings, the coronavirus crisis is "accelerating" in the south of the country.

Figures from Public Health England's weekly surveillance report show that the infection rate in Nottingham has fallen by 30 percent. Despite the city's shrinking outbreak, it will be placed under the toughest Tier 3 restrictions starting tomorrow along with the rest of the county.

Percentage change in coronavirus cases in London in the week ended October 25: The five local authorities that have seen the highest increase in infection rates are: Kingston upon Hull City, 92.81 percent; Derby, 91.84 percent; North Somerset, 82.99 percent; Medway, 77.17 percent; and Bath and North East Somerset 69.72 percent

And the data provided more evidence that the toughest lockdown measures work. Liverpool, Knowsley, Sefton and St. Helens are all seeing drops in their weekly coronavirus infection rates. The entire Merseyside area has been closed since October 14th.

It suggests that the brutal restrictions prohibiting people from being in contact with anyone outside of their own household, and imposing the closure of many pubs, bars, and in some cases gyms, are starting to work. However, scientists say that the real effects of the measure only become clear after a few weeks.

Boris Johnson is again being pressured by his doctors to impose a nationwide shutdown before and after Christmas so families can gather together over the holidays. Dominic Raab hinted today that No10 could introduce a new set of even stricter Level 4 restrictions and declined to rule out a national lockdown.

Katherine Kent, Co-Head of Analysis for the ONS Covid-19 Infection Survey, said: "With the ONS Infection Survey expanded, we are now seeing evidence of an increase in Covid-19 infections across the UK.

& # 39; Infections have continued to rise sharply in England, with the exception of all regions in the North East where infections seem to have now leveled off.

& # 39; Wales and Northern Ireland have seen higher levels of infections as well, although it is currently too early to spot any particular trend in Scotland, where we have been testing for a shorter period of time.

"If you look at infections in different age groups, the rates in secondary school children now seem to be increasing sharply, while older teenagers and young adults continue to have the highest rates of infection."

The ONS report, believed to be the most accurate way of estimating the true size of the UK Covid-19 outbreak, says the north of England is still hardest hit, but infections in the northeast appear to have flattened out.

In the northwest, the report said, one in 43 people carried the virus last week – a positivity rate of 2.3 percent.

In Yorkshire & Humber it was 1.9 percent – one in 53 people – and in the Northeast 1.2 percent – one in 83.

In the East and West Midlands the positive test rate was one percent – just like the English average – while in the other regions the rate was below one, with 0.8 percent in London and 0.5 percent in the east, southeast and southwest .

The report said: “Given trends over time, positivity has increased in most regions of England in the past two weeks. Rates continue to rise sharply in the North West as well as Yorkshire and The Humber.

& # 39; Positivity rates in the Northeast have flattened out in recent weeks but are still above the UK average. Previously, positivity rates were the same in the Southwest, but rates appear to be increasing. However, with rates remaining low, caution should be exercised when interpreting whether rates are rising in the Southwest. "

It was also noted that there are still differences in the fall rate between age groups and that young people continue to drive the outbreak, with infections "sharply" increasing in teenagers.

The infection rate appeared to jump from 1 percent to 1.5 percent between October 12 and 23 – an increase from one in 100 to one in 67 people – a bigger increase than any other age group.

The Department of Health yesterday announced an additional 23,065 positive coronavirus tests from across the UK, up 8.6 percent from last Thursday.

The number of people diagnosed with the disease has risen to a current daily average of 22,125 since early September.

However, testing only captures a fraction of the actual number of infections as many people are not tested, do not get sick with the virus, or get a false negative result.

So studies by scientists and mathematicians are the most accurate pictures of how many people are really infected with coronavirus, whether it makes them sick or not.

The King & # 39; s study relies on roughly one million people using the Covid Symptom Study app reporting if they feel sick and confirming the test results when they have it.

It is estimated that there are 43,569 new infections per day in the community in the UK and 34,628 in England. It is estimated that two-thirds of infections occur in the north and the Midlands.

19 NHS trusts are already treating more Covid-19 patients than in April, and admissions are increasing by a third per week

Almost 20 NHS trusts in England are already treating more coronavirus patients than at the height of the first wave. This comes from official statistics, which suggest that hospitals across the country may run out of beds before Christmas.

MailOnline's analysis of official NHS numbers shows 19 trusts are treating a higher number of Covid-19 patients than at the first peak.

Teaching Hospitals in Doncaster and Bassetlaw The NHS Foundation Trust now has three times as many infected patients on its wards as it did on April 12 – England's busiest day in the pandemic. At the time, only 67 beds were occupied by people with the disease, compared to 201 on October 27, the most recent snapshot released by the NHS.

At the Blackpool Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, 196 of his beds were occupied by Covid-19 patients on October 27. This is an increase of 68 percent compared to April 12, when doctors treated 117 infected people there.

104 coronavirus patients are currently being treated at the NHS Foundation Trust at Barnsley Hospital in South Yorkshire, according to the latest snapshot from NHS England. This is a comparison from 63 six months ago, which is an increase of nearly two-thirds.

East Lancashire Hospitals NHS Trust currently has 170 employees with Covid-19 on its ward, compared to 122 in the spring, an increase of nearly 40 percent. A similar story played out at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, where patient numbers rose from 210 to 289 (38 percent).

Liverpool University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust has 450 virus patients treated at its Merseyside hospitals. This represents an increase of more than 30 percent from the 346 patients treated for the disease on April 12th. The teaching hospitals of the Warrington and Halton NHS Foundation Trust saw the same rate of increase from 98 to 128.

The NHS Foundation Trust of Wrightington, Wigan and Leigh, the NHS Foundation Trust of North Tees and Hartlepool, and the NHS Foundation Trust of Bradford Teaching Hospitals are currently treating more than 20 percent more patients than in April.

In the restricted areas of the second level, the number of beds occupied by Covid 19 patients has increased by a similarly strong one. Hull University Teaching Hospitals The NHS Trust in East Yorkshire has 54 infected patients, up from 44 six months ago, a 23 percent increase.

North Midlands University Hospitals The NHS Trust has 171 infected people on its wards, more than a quarter more than the 124 on April 12.

The NHS Foundation Trust of Torbay and South Devon in the southwest technically has seen a 44 percent increase, despite having far fewer beds than some of the larger trusts in major cities. As of yesterday, 33 Covid-19 patients had been treated, compared to 23 on April 12.

The overall estimate is based on the average number of daily infections for the fourteen days ending October 25.

Imperial College London's government-funded study, REACT-1, estimated yesterday that there were 96,000 new infections per day. This study is also based on mass population tests and used 85,000 tests between October 16 and October 25.

A "nowcast" study by Cambridge University researchers yesterday put a figure of 55,600 a day based on the number of people dying from the disease and data showing how much people travel and interact.

Professor Tim Spector, who leads the King's College project, suggested that the highest estimate from the REACT study was exaggerated.

He said today: “While cases across the UK are still on the rise, we want to reassure people that the cases have not got out of hand, as other polls reported recently.

& # 39; We're still seeing a steady rise at the national level, doubling every four weeks, with the possible exception of Scotland, which is showing signs of slowing.

& # 39; With a million people reporting weekly, we have the largest national survey and our estimates are in line with the ONS survey.

“Covid-19 data can be confusing to the public, and we cannot simply rely on confirmed cases or daily deaths without putting them into context.

“Hospital admissions are increasing as expected, but deaths are still average for the season. When we become citizen scientists it is important to look at multiple sources to get a broader view. & # 39;

Looking back at the number of people dying from Covid-19, which Cambridge's Nowcast is based on, can provide a reliable estimate of infections, but the data includes delays as it usually takes more than two weeks for anyone to post the catch dies Covid19.

Officials believe that around 0.5 percent of people who contract coronavirus die from it – one in 200 people who become infected.

The average of 154 people who died every day in the UK for the week leading up to October 23 – the latest reliable data – suggests that 31,000 people were infected every day two to three weeks earlier.

However, this may not take into account the age differences between people who contract the virus. The infectious mortality rate is much lower in young people because the disease affects the elderly.

The UK's second wave was triggered by the virus, which spread to teenagers and people aged 20 and over in early September when universities and schools returned, and these groups are far less likely to die, which means there may be a higher ratio of infections There is 31,000 deaths per day and deaths could be an underestimate.

Data in the Covid Symptom Study estimated that the Northwest and Northeast and Yorkshire accounted for half of all new infections per day in England at 8,725 and 8,446 per day, respectively.

Another 7,404 of the daily infections occurred in the Midlands, followed by 4,977 per day in London. The lowest were the east of England at 2,278 per day and the south west at 2,607.

In Scotland, 4,674 new cases were reported per day in Scotland, followed by 3,397 in Wales and 1,230 in Northern Ireland.

SAGE today estimated Britain's R rate had fallen for the second week in a row, to between 1.1 and 1.3, in a clear sign the second wave continues to lose steam.

For comparison, the rate was placed between 1.2 and 1.4 in last Friday's report, and the week before it was between 1.3 and 1.5.

But it still remains above one – meaning the number of infections is still growing in the country.

The advisory panel predicted growth may be fastest in the South West, alongside the East of England, Midlands and South East, amid mounting evidence that the virus is no longer just causing havoc in the North. They also revealed infections may be spreading the slowest in the North West, where millions are living under the harshest Tier Three restrictions.

The government remains opposed to calls for a second UK national lockdown, fears economic devastation if people are forced to stay home, and pursues its local lockdown strategy.

Sixteen other areas, including parts of Yorkshire, Derbyshire, Telford, and Luton and Oxford, were classified as high risk Tier 2 restrictions yesterday.

And West Yorkshire will now enter tier three, alongside the Liverpool, Manchester and Nottingham regions – the highest tier of restrictions.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock said yesterday: “We continue to see a worrying surge in cases across the country and it is clear that decisive action is needed.

Data from King's College London's Covid Symptom Study app shows coronavirus cases in the UK have surged to more than 40,000 a day after a hiatus in the summer, but the team behind it claims they are "not getting out of hand are".

Data from King's College London's Covid Symptom Study app shows coronavirus cases in the UK have surged to more than 40,000 a day after a hiatus in the summer, but the team behind it claims they are "not getting out of hand are".

The north of England and the Midlands remain hardest hit by Covid-19, the King & # 39; s team predicts. Per-person infection rates are also high in Scotland, Wales, London and the university towns of southern England, including Bristol, Bournemouth, Exeter and Brighton

The north of England and the Midlands remain hardest hit by Covid-19, the King & # 39; s team predicts. Per-person infection rates are also high in Scotland, Wales, London and the university towns of southern England, including Bristol, Bournemouth, Exeter and Brighton

BRITAIN'S R RATE HAS DROPPED, SAGE SAYS

Britain's coronavirus R rate has dropped, according to the government's scientific advisers, amid mounting fears over rising infections across the country.

SAGE now estimates the reproduction rate – the average number of people each Covid-19 patient infects – stands between 1.1 and 1.3. The number must stay below one for an outbreak to shrink.

For comparison, it was between 1.2 and 1.4 last week. This marks the second week in a row that the group's estimate has fallen, with it standing at 1.3 to 1.5 in their previous report.

But despite the fall the advisory panel, whose advice is key to guiding Number 10 through the pandemic, warned it was certain the outbreak is still growing 'rapidly across the country'.

AREA

ENGLAND

UK

EAST

LONDON

MIDLANDS

NORTH EAST

NORTH WEST

SOUTH EAST

SOUTH WEST

THIS WEEK

1.1 – 1.3

1.1 – 1.3

1.2 – 1.4

1.1 – 1.3

1.2 – 1.4

1.1 – 1.3

1.0 – 1.2

1.2 – 1.4

1.2 – 1.5

LAST WEEK

1.2 – 1.4

1.2 – 1.4

1.2 – 1.4

1.1 – 1.3

1.1 – 1.3

1.1 – 1.3

1.1 – 1.3

1.2 – 1.5

1.3 – 1.6

& # 39; We agreed with local executives to move more areas to the High Local Covid Alert Level this week.

“These restrictions are challenging for all of us, but only if we work together and follow the rules can we reduce infection rates.

“Failure to act now will only result in prolonged disruption and greater economic damage.

“I want to thank everyone who is doing their part to break the chains of transmission across the country. We will defeat this virus, but we must stick together as we enter the winter months. & # 39;

Weekly data from Public Health England has shown that Covid-19 outbreaks are growing fastest in Hull, Derby and Bath, and only 20 out of 150 authorities in England saw a decrease in infections last week.

Hull and Derby saw their coronavirus epidemics almost double in the seven-day period ending October 25. The 7-day infection rate rose to 279 and 329 cases per 100,000 people, respectively.

Both cities, along with the rest of Staffordshire and Derbyshire, will move from Tier 1 to Tier 2 from Saturday to curb the surge in infections. This was announced yesterday as England moved one step closer to full national lockdown.

However, most of the authorities where epidemics have increased the most are still in the first tier, where only the 6pm and 10pm curfew only applies. Scientists have argued that these rules are not strict enough to reduce the outbreak. Top government advisors warn that current growth is "very bleak".

For example, North Somerset and Bath, as well as North East Somerset, where cases have increased 83 percent and 70 percent in a week, are not yet affected by tighter virus-fighting restrictions. Despite the warnings, the coronavirus crisis is "accelerating" in the south of the country.

Figures from Public Health England's weekly surveillance report show that the infection rate in Nottingham has fallen by 30 percent. Despite the city's shrinking outbreak, it will be placed under the toughest Tier 3 restrictions starting tomorrow along with the rest of the county.

And the data provided more evidence that the toughest lockdown measures work. Liverpool, Knowsley, Sefton and St. Helens are all seeing drops in their weekly coronavirus infection rates. The entire Merseyside area has been closed since October 14th.

It suggests that the brutal restrictions prohibiting people from being in contact with anyone outside of their own household, and imposing the closure of many pubs, bars, and in some cases gyms, are starting to work. However, scientists say that the real effects of the measure only become clear after a few weeks.

Boris Johnson is again being pressured by his doctors to impose a nationwide shutdown before and after Christmas so families can gather together over the holidays. Dominic Raab hinted today that No10 could introduce a new set of even stricter Level 4 restrictions and declined to rule out a national lockdown.

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