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Commuters beat up transport bosses for canceled trains and a lack of social distancing on London buses


Commuters have beaten up transportation bosses for canceled trains and lack of social distancing on London buses as employees drive to work in rush hour Monday morning.

One train passenger has reported in South Eastern about the cancellation of trains while another claimed to be overcrowded on a Transport for London bus.

It is therefore that commuters are returning to their workplaces after the coronavirus lockdown. Today's road data shows how rush hour traffic has now almost reached before Covid.

A Twitter user who tweeted a picture of an overcrowded train car today said, "You can first ask South Eastern to wait their trains before Monday rush hour as they continue to cancel trains that are causing train congestion. "

Another, Dilasha Patel, who tweeted a picture of a London bus, said, “You might ask Sadiq Khan why Transport for London buses don't follow maximum capacity.

“For two mornings I had 20 people on a 14-capacity bus. I'm going to work 40 minutes early today, even though I'll be there 20 minutes before I start anyway! & # 39;

Commuters have beaten up transportation bosses for canceled trains and lack of social distancing on London buses as employees drive to work in rush hour Monday morning. Picutred: Commuters arrive at Waterloo Station in London today

Commuters flocked to London's main train stations, including London Waterloo, as more people returned to work after the coronavirus pandemic

Commuters flocked to London's main train stations, including London Waterloo, as more people returned to work after the coronavirus pandemic

Commuters, all wearing face-covering as required by law, lined up to get through the ticket offices at the busy train station - a scene not often seen since the country collapsed

Commuters, all wearing face-covering as required by law, lined up to get through the ticket offices at the busy train station – a scene not often seen since the country collapsed

It is because train traffic will be increased to 90 percent of pre-Covid levels from today when schools reopen and more workers return to the office. Pictured: Commuters arrive at Waterloo Station

It is because train traffic will be increased to 90 percent of pre-Covid levels from today when schools reopen and more workers return to the office. Pictured: Commuters arrive at Waterloo Station

According to information on the Transport for London website, double-decker buses can carry up to 30 passengers, while single-decker buses can carry either 11 or 14 passengers, depending on their size.

The capacity limits were set after the coronavirus outbreak.

Today, commuters have been spilled in major London train stations, including London Waterloo, as more people return to work following the coronavirus pandemic.

Commuters, all wearing face-covering as required by law, lined up to get through the ticket offices at the busy train station – a scene not often seen since the country collapsed.

There was also a lot of traffic on the roads this morning, especially on the M25 around London.

The A40 at Perviale in West London could also be seen with queues on either side of the six-lane road.

The A40 at Perviale in West London could also be seen with queues on either side of the six-lane road

The A40 at Perviale in West London could also be seen with queues on either side of the six-lane road

The M25 around London was also busy this morning. This image from a Highways England camera shows the congestion

The M25 around London was also busy this morning. This image from a Highways England camera shows the congestion

TomTom's traffic data in London shows that traffic in London was close to pre-Covid-19 levels at 8 a.m.

TomTom's traffic data in London shows that traffic in London was close to pre-Covid-19 levels at 8 a.m.

History was a little different in Manchester, where congestion rates were still below pre-Covid-19 levels

History was a little different in Manchester, where congestion rates were still below pre-Covid-19 levels

There was also an increase in traffic congestion in Birmingham today, but it was still below pre-Covid-19 levels

There was also an increase in traffic congestion in Birmingham today, but it was still below pre-Covid-19 levels

The London Underground was also busy today as commuters, all wearing face masks, went to work

The London Underground was also busy today as commuters, all wearing face masks, went to work

Commuters were seen on an escalator on the Jubilee Line of the London Underground today

Commuters were seen on an escalator on the Jubilee Line of the London Underground today

It was busy on the trails too when commuters decided to walk across London Bridge on their way to work today

It was busy on the trails too when commuters decided to walk across London Bridge on their way to work today

Large numbers of people have been seen walking across the bridge which is usually busy with commuting in the morning and afternoon

Large numbers of people have been seen walking across the bridge which is usually busy with commuting in the morning and afternoon

It is because train traffic will be increased to 90 percent of pre-Covid levels from today when schools reopen and more workers return to the office.

Rail Delivery Group (RDG), which represents train operators and Network Rail, said services across the UK will be ramped up to around 90 percent of the pre-coronavirus pandemic from Sept. 7.

Timetables were cut in March as the virus resulted in a reduction in available rail workers and demand for travel.

The RDG said new timetables, which will be rolled out next month, have been worked out through communication with schools and other educational institutions in order to be able to offer more frequent services or to be able to add additional carts on potentially busy routes.

Schools in England and Wales will reopen in early September.

ScotRail expanded its services earlier this month before teaching in Scottish schools resumed.

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