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Commuters beat up transport bosses for canceled trains and a lack of social distancing on London buses


Canceled trains, overcrowded buses and traffic jams greeted commuters on the first Monday after the end of the summer vacation – when London's Mayor got stuck in one of his own road works on his way to work.

Sadiq Khan, who insisted today that London's public transport network was safe to use, was seen in traffic in a £ 120,000 Range Rover this morning as his driver tried to get into Tooting through road works.

Meanwhile, commuters have beaten up transportation bosses for canceled trains and lack of social distancing on London buses today as employees head to work in rush hour Monday morning.

One train passenger has reported for train cancellations in the southeast, while another claimed to be overcrowded on a Transport for London bus.

It is because commuters are returning to work after the coronavirus lockdown. Today's road data shows how rush hour traffic has now almost reached before Covid.

A Twitter user who tweeted a picture of an overcrowded train car today said: "You can first ask South Eastern to wait their trains before Monday rush hour as they continue to cancel trains that cause overloading. "

Another, Dilasha Patel, who tweeted a picture of a London bus, said, “You might ask Sadiq Khan why Transport for London buses don't follow maximum capacity.

“For two mornings I had 20 people on a 14-capacity bus. I'm going to work 40 minutes early today, even though I'm there 20 minutes before I start anyway! & # 39;

One person caught in traffic was London's own Mayor Sadiq Khan, pictured here going to work. He spoke to Good Morning Britain today and praised TFL as one of the world's leading cleaning systems

The Labor politician was photographed wearing a face mask while sitting in traffic in a £ 120,000 Range Rover as the driver tried to get through an overload caused by a closure in Tooting

The Labor politician was photographed with a face mask sitting in traffic in a £ 120,000 Range Rover as the driver tried to get through an overload caused by a closure in Tooting

Commuters have beaten up transportation bosses for canceled trains and lack of social distancing on London buses as employees drive to work in rush hour Monday morning. Picutred: Commuters arrive at Waterloo Station in London today

Commuters have beaten up transportation bosses for canceled trains and lack of social distancing on London buses as employees drive to work in rush hour Monday morning. Picutred: Commuters arrive at Waterloo Station in London today

Commuters flocked to London's main train stations, including London Waterloo, as more people returned to work following the coronavirus pandemic

Commuters flocked to London's main train stations, including London Waterloo, as more people returned to work after the coronavirus pandemic

Commuters, all wearing face-covering as required by law, stood in line to get through the ticket offices at the busy train station - a scene not often seen since the country collapsed

Commuters, all wearing face-covering as required by law, lined up to get through the ticket offices at the busy train station – a scene not often seen since the country collapsed

It is because train traffic will be increased to 90 percent of pre-Covid levels from today when schools reopen and more workers return to the office. Pictured: Commuters arrive at Waterloo Station

It is because train traffic will be increased to 90 percent of pre-Covid levels from today when schools reopen and more workers return to the office. Pictured: Commuters arrive at Waterloo Station

According to information on the Transport for London website, double-decker buses can carry up to 30 passengers, while single-decker buses can carry either 11 or 14 passengers, depending on their size.

The capacity limits were set after the coronavirus outbreak.

Today, commuters have been spilled in major London train stations, including London Waterloo, as more people return to work following the coronavirus pandemic.

Commuters, all wearing face-covering as required by law, lined up to get through the ticket offices at the busy train station – a scene not often seen since the country collapsed.

There was also a lot of traffic on the roads this morning, especially on the M25 around London.

The A40 at Perviale in West London could also be seen with queues on either side of the six-lane road.

The A40 at Perviale in West London could also be seen with queues on either side of the six-lane road

The A40 at Perviale in West London could also be seen with queues on either side of the six lane road

The M25 around London was also busy this morning. This image from a Highways England camera shows the congestion

The M25 around London was also busy this morning. This image from a Highways England camera shows the congestion

TomTom's traffic data in London shows that traffic in London was close to pre-Covid-19 levels at 8 a.m.

TomTom's traffic data in London shows that traffic in London was close to pre-Covid-19 levels at 8 a.m.

TomTom weekly congestion data from London shows traffic in London is getting back to normal

TomTom weekly congestion data from London shows traffic in London is returning to normal

History was a little different in Manchester, where congestion rates were still below pre-Covid-19 levels

History was a little different in Manchester, where congestion rates were still below pre-Covid-19 levels

There was also an increase in traffic congestion in Birmingham today, but it was still below pre-Covid-19 levels

There was also an increase in traffic congestion in Birmingham today, but it was still below pre-Covid-19 levels

Data from Dutch developer TomTom shows that London's congestion rate is now close to Covid.

The data shows that the congestion level in the capital was around 62 percent, just below the 63 percent figure at the same time on the same day last year.

Data from Manchester and Birmingham show that congestion rates in the two cities were still below pre-Covid levels at 8 a.m. today.

Manchester congestion was still 28 percent lower than at the same time and date last year.

What does TomTom congestion data say about traffic?

Data from Dutch developer TomTom shows that London's congestion rate is now close to Covid.

The data shows that the congestion level in the capital was around 62 percent, just below the 63 percent figure at the same time on the same day last year.

Data from Manchester and Birmingham show that congestion rates in the two cities were still below pre-Covid levels at 8 a.m. today.

Manchester congestion was still 28 percent lower than at the same time and date last year.

The congestion at 9 a.m., however, increased by 9 percent from 33 percent to 42 percent over the previous year.

The congestion had increased enormously compared to the congestion of 4 percent at 9 a.m. last Monday – a weekend on public holidays – and of 16 percent two weeks ago – which was still in the summer vacation.

The same goes for Birmingham, where data at 8 a.m. showed a seven percent drop in traffic compared to the same period last year.

However, the data for 9 a.m., which showed 43 percent congestion, was up 15 percent year over year, nearly 40 percent over public holidays, and 30 percent over the previous week.

TomTom said there was more than 1300 traffic in London just before 9 a.m. this morning for a total of 873 km.

However, the congestion at 9 a.m. increased by 9 percent from 33 percent to 42 percent over the previous year.

The congestion had increased enormously compared to the congestion of 4 percent at 9 a.m. last Monday – a weekend on bank holidays – and of 16 percent two weeks ago – which was still in the summer holidays.

Same goes for Birmingham, where data at 8 a.m. showed a seven percent drop in traffic compared to the same period last year.

However, the data for 9 a.m., which showed 43 percent congestion, was up 15 percent year over year, nearly 40 percent over public holidays, and 30 percent over the previous week.

TomTom said there was more than 1300 traffic in London just before 9 a.m. this morning for a total of 873 km.

One person caught in traffic was London's own mayor, Sadiq Khan.

The Labor politician was photographed wearing a face mask while sitting in traffic in a £ 120,000 Range Rover as the driver tried to get through an overload caused by a road closure in Tooting.

The area is part of a new program jointly funded by Wandsworth Council and Transport for London to create the Low Traffic Neighborhood (LTN) in the area.

The testing program, launched last month, aims to free up additional space on the freeway to aid social distancing and encourage alternative forms of travel.

Transport for London (TfL) is also testing its own separate and additional measures on the A24 Tooting High Street / Upper Tooting Road.

Mr. Khan today defended TfL as "some of the world's leading improved cleaning systems" when he urged that public transport be safe for commuters.

Speaking to Good Morning Britain, he said: “We use a hospital-style antiviral disinfectant. We have hand disinfectants available throughout the network.

“You finally have to wear a mask when you use public transport, but we've also made sure that this is enforced now.

“Our subways, buses, trams, and subways are as safe as possible, but I realize that due to social distancing rules, we simply cannot have the same number of people using our services as before, especially during rush hour

“So we spoke to employers and good employers moved their start and end times to avoid rush hour.

“That means you can use the subway and you won't be as nervous as you were before this pandemic started, but we've also created safe bike paths and made walking easier.

"So if you don't use public transport, you can walk or bike to find other ways to get to work, or you can work from home if it makes sense."

The London Underground was also busy today as commuters, all wearing face masks, went to work

The London Underground was also busy today as commuters, all wearing face masks, went to work

Commuters were seen on an escalator on the Jubilee Line of the London Underground today

Commuters were seen on an escalator on the Jubilee Line of the London Underground today

Meanwhile, Apple mobility data shows that usage by people who walk is increasing across the country – back to pre-Covid-19 levels.

Mobility data for London shows that for the first time since March – when lockdown measures were imposed – the number of people walking has finally reached baseline levels.

The September 5 data shows an increase in the number of people using map data on Apple devices to draw walks.

The data shrank to almost -90 percent in April – at the height of the pandemic – but has increased steadily since then.

Similarly, driving trends in London have increased significantly over the past two months, and data shows that inquiries are now 20 percent higher than they were since January 13 this year – before the coronavirus is believed to hit the UK Has.

Although they are the slowest to recover, requests for public transport cards have also increased.

They are still down 12 percent from early January but have increased steadily since April, when they fell.

It was busy on the trails too when commuters decided to walk across London Bridge on their way to work today

It was busy on the trails too when commuters decided to walk across London Bridge on their way to work today

Large numbers of people have been seen walking across the bridge which is usually busy with commuting in the morning and afternoon

Large numbers of people have been seen walking across the bridge which is usually busy with commuting in the morning and afternoon

It is because train traffic will be increased to 90 percent of pre-Covid levels from today when schools reopen and more workers return to the office.

Rail Delivery Group (RDG), which represents train operators and Network Rail, said services across the UK will be ramped up to around 90 percent of the pre-coronavirus pandemic from Sept. 7.

Timetables were cut in March as the virus resulted in a reduction in available rail workers and demand for travel.

The RDG said that new timetables, which will be rolled out next month, have been worked out through communication with schools and other educational institutions to offer more frequent services or to be able to add additional cars on potentially busy routes.

Schools in England and Wales reopened this month after closing following the March outbreak.

ScotRail expanded its services earlier this month before teaching resumed in Scottish schools.

Commuters can "travel with confidence," the rail industry says when services ramp up after Covid

Commuters are told they can "travel with confidence" as rail traffic ramped up on Monday.

The industry association Rail Delivery Group (RDG) insisted that trains are "safe to drive on" as the timetables were increased to around 90% of the pandemic before the coronavirus.

This means additional and longer trains on many routes, especially at peak times.

Robert Nisbet, RDG Director for Nations and Regions, told BBC Radio 4's Today program: “Today is really about telling commuters that you can travel with confidence and that we will use more trains to increase capacity increase.

The industry association Rail Delivery Group (RDG) insisted that trains are "safe to drive on" as the timetables were increased to around 90% of the pandemic before the coronavirus. Pictured: Commuters arrive at London Waterloo Station

The industry association Rail Delivery Group (RDG) insisted that trains are "safe to drive on" as the timetables were increased to around 90% of the pandemic before the coronavirus. Pictured: Commuters arrive at London Waterloo Station

“But we also ensure that these trains can be used safely by improving hygiene (and cleaning) in stations and trains.

"Of course we also ask people to do their part by wearing face masks and making sure their hands are clean before and after the trip."

Rail punctuality has improved during the pandemic: 83 percent of stops at train stations were made within a minute of the timetable in July, compared with 66 percent in July 2019.

Anthony Smith, managing director of Passenger Watchdog Transport Focus, said the industry needs to focus on maintaining good performance.

He warned: "Disturbances and any crowding are particularly undesirable and can damage trust in the railroad."

Timetables were cut in March as the virus resulted in a reduction in available rail workers and demand for travel. However, they were gradually increased to around 80 percent before ramping up on Monday.

Mr Nisbet said there was "important insight" for the industry regarding the impact of a full schedule on performance.

"Before Covid, a train left a station every second," he explained. & # 39; We were overloaded.

"What this (pandemic) has allowed us to do is look at the schedule and its resilience, and see where we can improve and increase punctuality, and build and maintain that as we now rebuild the schedule."

Southeastern is offering an additional 900 carriages on weekdays, bringing schedules back to 98 percent of normal levels.

LNER has added 10 additional Anglo-Scottish services to its daily schedule.

ScotRail increased services last month before teaching Scottish schools resumed.

The Department of Transport figures show that train demand across the UK is around 30 percent of pre-pandemic levels.

A survey of 2,000 public transport users by Transport Focus last month found that 77 percent of train passengers were satisfied with the ability to keep a safe distance from others.

The research also found that 50 percent were satisfied with the ease of figuring out how busy train traffic would be before traveling, and 69 percent with the number of people wearing face coverings.

Some operators are returning to normal refund rules on Monday after the pandemic eases restrictions.

This means that season ticket refunds will not be backdated more than 56 days from the last travel date and administration fees of up to £ 10 for single or return ticket refunds can be refunded.

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