ENTERTAINMENT

Commuter cities bear the brunt of the end of the vacation amid the middle-class bloodbath


The The pandemic has sparked a middle-class unemployment crisis that will "get much worse" this Christmas, experts warn.

The analysis shows the extent of the carnage in workplaces in commuter cities, resorts and manufacturing centers.

In the hardest hit cities, the number of doles has already tripled.

The ten worst-hit areas have 138,000 unemployment benefits – 75,000 more than before the pandemic.

The pandemic has sparked a middle-class unemployment crisis that will "get worse" this Christmas, experts warn

The analysis by the Center for Economic and Business Research (CEBR) gives rise to fears that wealthy communities will also become fallow land as they are being hit by the coronavirus recession.

It shows that the hardest hit areas are Slough, Luton and Peterborough, as well as affluent seaside resorts like Brighton.

Economists predict a million jobs will be lost in the next nine weeks after the vacation program ends on Saturday.

Doug McWilliams, vice chairman of the CEBR, said, “The middle class is likely to be hit much worse as it goes. Many management jobs are gone, many professional jobs are gone, and some specialized jobs are gone. The middle class is in an employment crisis – their pensions will be depressed and house prices will be lower. & # 39;

The dismal numbers come from data from the Office of National Statistics showing that the number of applicants increased in the 12 months ended September 10th. This combines those applying for a universal loan looking for work and those receiving unemployment benefits.

The CEBR has identified the top ten cities hardest hit that have suffered from the virus' impact on economic sectors such as aviation, manufacturing, hospitality and tourism.

The hardest hit areas include Slough (pictured), Luton and Peterborough, as well as affluent seaside resorts like Brighton

The hardest hit areas include Slough (pictured), Luton and Peterborough, as well as affluent seaside resorts like Brighton

The analysis excludes London, Birmingham, Manchester and Liverpool, which currently have 635,440 unemployment benefit claims (up from 250,985 a year ago) to focus on the economic devastation in cities and regional cities that typically find it harder to escape To recover from recessions.

In Slough, which is heavily dependent on Heathrow, the number of job seekers more than tripled in one year from 2.6 percent of the working-age population to 8.5 percent, or from 2,510 to 8,100.

In Luton, Easyjet's headquarters, the number has risen from 4,025 to 11,690. Tightened coronavirus rules announced last week will hit several highlighted regions.

Local executives in Blackpool, now under the toughest tier three restrictions, say the resort is facing "the equivalent of three winters in a row".

Like Brighton, the city has suffered a sharp drop in visitor numbers.

Northampton is one of several manufacturing centers where thousands of jobs have been cut, while Wolverhampton unemployed rose from 9,645 to 17,280 after Jaguar Land Rover and aerospace giant Collins cut jobs.

Since March, tens of thousands of jobs in professional consulting, aviation, events, art and travel have disappeared.

Small independent high street businesses are having to lay off employees when shoppers order online. Covid restrictions threaten to kill bars, pubs and hotels and hit thousands of small suppliers. Theaters, music venues and galleries have cut staff while the National Trust laid off 1,300.

Last week, Chancellor Rishi Sunak expanded his winter career program. Prior to its announcement, economists predicted that unemployment would currently top 1.5 million, or 4.5 percent, by Christmas.

Last night there were calls for targeted government support for the worst hit areas. Simon Clarke, Tory MP for Middlesbrough South, said: “We have been left behind for 40 years. We need breakthrough investments. & # 39;

Paul Maynard, Tory MP for Blackpool North, said, "Any economy that is seasonal is now facing three winters in a row."

Hove Labor MP Peter Kyle said: "The Treasury Department needs to provide more effective support to prevent cities like Brighton from being left behind for a generation."

"I was worried about putting food on the table."

Cold charity

Dave Day was hit by layoffs in July and now fears he will struggle to pay his mortgage and "keep food on the table."

The 51-year-old had worked for the Brighton Charity Impact Initiative for more than four years, caring for families and the elderly with dementia.

Mr Day, who has a 12-year-old son, was on leave in March and hoped to return to work after the pandemic. However, in July he was told that his £ 20,000 a year job was no longer sustainable and he was fired.

Dave Day was hit by layoffs in July and now fears he will struggle to pay his mortgage and "keep food on the table".

Dave Day was hit by layoffs in July and now fears he will struggle to pay his mortgage and "keep food on the table".

Mr Day from Brighton said: “It was a blow as I really didn't know how we were going to pay the mortgage and put food on the table. Like everyone else, we had to tighten our belts massively. We had to cut out things we loved … and we had to use vouchers for school meals. & # 39;

Mr. Day worked as a freelancer after being contacted by families still desperate for the personal attention he had offered during his time at the charity.

He said people were "still desperate for help" and added that "it will take a long time for some charities to recover".

Heathrow Hell

Hayley Morton, mother of two, struggles to make ends meet after being fired from her job after 15 years.

Ms. Morton, 33, was a customs officer for an in-flight entertainment company called Panasonic Aviation based at Heathrow Airport.

Hayley Morton, mother of two, struggles to make ends meet after being fired from her job after 15 years

Hayley Morton, mother of two, struggles to make ends meet after being fired from her job after 15 years

She was not on vacation during the lockdown and spent much of her time in the office. She refused to volunteer, but her company bosses quit their jobs a week later.

Miss Morton, a single parent from Slough, said she was now concerned about how she would care for her two sons, who are seven and ten years old. She said, “It's hard not to worry, it will be at least six weeks before I get government support. In the meantime, I have to afford my rent, food, and everything for my boys. & # 39;

Fashion disaster

Thea McCarthy-Curless was devastated after losing her dream job at a luxury fashion events company.

The 27-year-old had worked on events for designers such as Dior, Vivienne Westwood and Bulgari but was fired in early October.

Thea McCarthy-Curless was devastated after losing her dream job at a luxury fashion events company

Thea McCarthy-Curless was devastated after losing her dream job at a luxury fashion events company

She said, “Everyone in my industry is suffering so much from the pandemic. I try very hard to be positive, but it's tough.

“It wasn't like it was just an old job for me, it was my whole career.

"My industry is hardest hit by this crisis because no one has any idea when we can next hold events on the scale that we did before."

Miss McCarthy worked for Soho's My Beautiful City production agency, which produces events for some of the biggest fashion brands.

Miss McCarthy, from Haggerston, East London, will now focus on freelance work. She said, "I'm getting my last paycheck next month and I know I have to enjoy it."

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