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Columnist Suzanne Moore is leaving The Guardian


The newspaper, which portrays itself as a bastion of liberalism and tolerance and is openly judged by other media, was hoisted today by its own petard after one of its top columnists quit in the midst of a "transphobia" series.

Suzanne Moore today announced her shock exit from The Guardian after a career spanning more than 25 years.

She later appeared to take a slap on the left-wing newspaper by changing her Twitter bio to "She went because she understood the value of defiance".

It comes after the award-winning journalist got at the center of a "transphobia" storm earlier this year over a column about the abuse of feminists by trans-extremists.

In the article published in March under the headline, “Women Must Have the Right to Organize. We're not being silenced, ”she wrote of gender as a biological classification and“ no emotion ”.

However, the comment prompted 338 Guardian employees to write to editor Katharine Viner complaining about the "pattern of publishing transphobic content".

Ms. Moore, who won the Orwell Foundation's 2019 Journalism Award and has been a consistent contributor to the newspaper for 10 years after working for the newspaper early in her career, also announced that she and her children had received threats of murder and rape.

Their departure comes amid a series of high-profile arguments between feminism and transgender lobbies. Harry Potter writer JK Rowling was criticized earlier this year after mocking an online article that used the words "people who menstruate" instead of "women".

Others criticized by transgender rights groups include Professor Selina Todd of Oxford University and feminist blogger Kellie-Jay Keen-Minshull.

When Ms. Moore announced her resignation on Monday evening, she tweeted, “I have left The Guardian. I will miss some of the people there very much. Right now that's all I can say. & # 39;

Suzanne Moore (pictured 2016) resigned months after receiving a backlash for her column on trans-extremist abuse of feminists

When she announced her resignation on Monday night, she tweeted, “I have left The Guardian. I will miss some of the people there very much. "Right now that's all I can say."

When she announced her resignation on Monday night, she tweeted, “I have left The Guardian. I will miss some of the people there very much. "Right now that's all I can say."

Suzanne Moore was at the center of a storm in March after publishing this column: “Women must have the right to organize. We are not being silenced. & # 39;

Suzanne Moore was at the center of a storm in March after publishing this column: “Women must have the right to organize. We are not being silenced. & # 39;

“Women must have the right to organize. We will not be silenced & # 39 ;: Guardian pillar that sparked a backlash

Suzanne Moore's column, “Women Must Have the Right to Organize. We're not being silenced, ”was posted in the Guardian on March 2 of this year.

In it, she addressed the question of how an Oxford historian was forbidden to speak at a feminist historical event.

Selina Todd, professor of modern history at St. Hilda & # 39; s College, received security after the "Transphobia" series.

Women trans rights activists have been believed to have questioned their ties to women's rights group Woman & # 39; s Place UK – some of whom claim are "transphobic".

Professor Todd, who has always denied having transphobic views, was due to give a two-minute speech at an event at Exeter College.

But the day before Professor Todd was due to speak, she was "off-platform".

Ms. Moore wrote: "I am very saddened to look at the fragmentation of the landscape where endless struggles, rejections and non-platforms have obscured our understanding of who the real enemies are."

Her column concluded: “Women have the right to call out the violent men who rape. We have the right to speak and organize without being told that language itself is dangerous. You can tell me to die in a ditch if you like everything, as many have for years, but I identify myself as a woman who doesn't go quietly down.

She added, “It was entirely my decision to leave. I'll tell you all about it one day. For now, thank you for this great news. I feel like at my own funeral or something.

“Anyway, I will of course keep writing! The efforts to silence me don't seem very well thought out. & # 39;

Trainspotting writer Irvine Welsh, ex-soccer player Gary Lineker, rock band Primal Scream and MP Jess Phillips shared their support for Ms. Moore, among others.

Journalists Polly Toynbee and Ian Dunt and writer Giles Paley-Phillips have also expressed their sadness over Ms. Moore's departure.

Ms. Moore's Twitter biography now reads: "She left because she understood the value of defiance."

The employee letter denouncing "transphobic content" that did not mention Ms. Moore was forwarded to Buzzfeed and Pink News following her column.

Ms. Moore later named the signatories online.

The argument began after Ms. Moore addressed how Oxford historian Selina Todd was not allowed to speak at a feminist historical event.

Ms. Todd, professor of modern history at St. Hilda's College, was given assurance about a "transphobia" series.

Women trans rights activists have been believed to have questioned their ties to women's rights group Woman & # 39; s Place UK – some of whom claim are "transphobic".

The group urged ministers to deliberate more fully on amending the Gender Recognition Act, which would allow people to identify themselves as men or women without the consent of a doctor.

Professor Todd, who has always denied having transphobic views, was due to give a two-minute speech at an event at Exeter College.

But the day before Professor Todd was due to speak, she was "off-platform".

Ms. Moore defended it in a column written on March 2nd saying, “We went through the mirror and learned that sex is a construct.

“It is said that sex is only assigned at birth and is not a material fact – in fact, however, sex is evident in the womb (which allows the fetal sex to be selected).

& # 39; Sex is not a feeling. Female is a biological classification that applies to all living species. If you produce large immobile gametes, you are female.

“Even if you are a frog. This is not complicated, nor is there a spectrum, although there are few intersex people who should definitely be supported. & # 39;

She adds: “The materiality of a female body can mean rape or childbirth – but we still strive for liberation from sex.

In some transgender ideologies we are told the opposite: gender is material and therefore can be obsessed by anyone who claims it, and it is sex as a category that is a social construction. In this way, legally protected gender-specific rights can be abolished.

“I know from my own experience the consequences of being classified as transphobic by an invisible social media committee. It meant death threats, rape threats for me and my children, and police involvement. I also know that the worst things happen online rather than in real life. Still, I can't watch.

“Most people want the tiny percentage of transsexuals to lead the best possible life.

"Male violence is an issue for women, so we want same-sex spaces."

Ms. Moore was supported by a legion of fans after announcing her resignation

Ms. Moore was supported by a legion of fans after announcing her resignation

The debate began after Ms. Moore spoke about Oxford historian Selina Todd, who was banned from speaking at a feminist historical event

The debate began after Ms. Moore spoke about Oxford historian Selina Todd, who was banned from speaking at a feminist historical event

In an article for The Spectator on March 14, Ms. Moore wrote: “A look at Twitter after my Guardian column went online indicated that I was either the savior of all 'birth women' or had committed some sort of transphobic hate crime .

“My offense was to say that biological sex is a thing. Scientists tend to believe that it is.

After all this online abuse, I thought someone could call me and see if I was okay, but they didn't. But then I never go to the Guardian's office. Apparently there had been melodrama.

A trans woman who appeared to have resigned a few weeks earlier resigned again. My words made her feel insecure, she said. More than 300 employees of the newspaper signed a letter condemning the decision to publish my article.

& # 39; I like freaks. I like fluidity. I just don't like it when one rule set is replaced by another.

"I was hurt that so many of my 'colleagues' denounced me, but I suppose everyone needs a hobby."

A Guardian News and Media spokesperson said: "We wish Suzanne all the best in her future career and we are sorry she left."

Suzanne Moore: The newest high profile name caught in the line of transgender rights and the growing "cancellation culture".

Guardian journalist Suzanne Moore is the latest known name to be implicated in a series about transgender rights.

In June, Harry Potter writer JK Rowling hit the headlines after mocking an online article that used the words "men who menstruate" instead of "women".

She was hit by what she termed "relentless attacks" after she wrote, "I'm sure there was a word for these people before. Somebody help me. Wumben? Wimpund? Woomud?"

Her tweet immediately sparked a flurry of criticism from her LGBTQ followers – who argued over what they viewed as an attack on transgender women.

JK Rowling got embroiled in another transphobia franchise in September after directing fans to a website that sold "offensive" badges and stickers that read, "transwomen are men."

JK Rowling got embroiled in another transphobia franchise in September after directing fans to a website that sold "offensive" badges and stickers that read, "transwomen are men."

The 55-year-old author appeared to be targeting her critics in September and tweeted a photo of herself in a t-shirt with the slogan: "This witch doesn't burn."

The 55-year-old author appeared to be targeting her critics in September and tweeted a photo of herself in a T-shirt with the slogan: "This witch doesn't burn."

Rowling's remarks sparked backlash from a number of stars including actors Rupert Grint, Emma Watson, Daniel Radcliffe and Eddie Redmayne.

The acclaimed writer then penned a deeply personal essay to address the controversy. She revealed that she was sexually assaulted in her twenties and said she still felt the scars of "domestic violence" in her first marriage.

A feminist blogger behind a controversial billboard defining "woman" as "adult human woman" was beaten by viewers earlier this year when she insisted that trans women did not qualify for "This Morning".

Kellie-Jay Keen-Minshull, 44, made headlines in 2018 with a poster that carried the definition of a woman – "adult human woman".

It was built to coincide with the Labor Party conference in Liverpool, but was removed when 31-year-old Dr. Adrian Harrop, who is not transgender, complained at the Primesight poster company that it made transgender women feel insecure.

Kellie-Jay Keen-Minshull, 44, made headlines in 2018 with a poster that carried the definition of a woman - "adult human woman".

Kellie-Jay Keen-Minshull, 44, made headlines in 2018 with a poster that carried the definition of a woman – "adult human woman".

Kellie-Jay received widespread criticism when she appeared that morning to defend the billboard and her views in a debate with transgender activist India Willoughby that passed over three years ago.

Speaking to India, Kellie-Jay insisted that she did not consider trans women as women, arguing that they should live as men instead.

She said, “I really don't think there is any meaningful way to change sex. Every cell in the human body has the DNA code of what gender you are. India obviously looks like a woman, but I don't see India as a woman. & # 39;

Kellie-Jay argued that transgender women, legally recognized as women, interfere with the rights and freedom of people born female.

She said, "We seem to be losing the word woman … I was just thinking the gist of this debate, and what we are losing is the word" woman "to mean adult human woman.

"If you decide that men can come into the women's room … it's no longer the women's room."

Oxford University Professor of Modern History Selina Todd came under fire earlier this year as she joined other speakers at the Defend Me or Expel Me event in London, hosted by supporters of the Labor Women's Declaration was organized.

She was one of nine headliners who spoke out against Labor's trans rights pledges.

The event followed an ongoing backlash due to the cancellation of Professor Todd & # 39; s lecture at a feminist festival at Exeter College.

She was not invited to the event, which commemorated the 50th anniversary of Ruskin College's first women's liberation conference after trans-inclusive feminists pointed out their links with Woman & # 39; s Place.

In a March cancellation statement, Professor Todd said: “I am shocked that this event, organized by the Oxford International Women’s Festival and hosted at Exeter College, is not a platform.

& # 39; I was asked to attend in October 2019 and I explained to the organizers that some trans activists might object to my presence.

"I was then told that trans activists had already expressed hostility towards the event because they claimed that second wave feminism was inherently trans-exclusive."

Among those who spoke out against her expulsion was activist Julie Bindel, who told organizers, “You should be ashamed of giving in to this mob.

Professor Todd denies having discriminatory views against trans people.

It comes amid an increasing surge in the so-called "cancellation culture".

Actor Laurence Fox was implicated in bitter leggings earlier this year with a number of people who called him a "racist" because of comments on Twitter.

Actor Laurence Fox was implicated in bitter leggings earlier this year with a number of people who called him a "racist" because of comments on Twitter

Actor Laurence Fox was implicated in bitter leggings earlier this year with a number of people who referred to him as a "racist" because of comments on Twitter

Earlier this month he announced that he had been dropped on a phone call by his acting agent but insisted that he had done nothing "that could be considered racist".

ITV drama star Lewis, who became the target of left wing Twitter users after appearing in Question Time, also said there was "a pretty concerted urge to calm me down."

He told radio host Julia Hartley-Brewer: "You can't just silence everyone, there is an emotional and intellectual fragility for people who don't tolerate dissenting voices."

Fox added that the abandonment culture, where people are asked to retire from their careers because of perceived missteps, is "very dangerous".

Society must "talk and debate," he said, claiming that "breaking culture creates an even more myopic monoculture, and whoever wants to".

He said the "bright religion lacks rationality" and added, "Their approach is to destroy life."

“I think this very left agenda has marched through our institutions for decades. It's a very divisive tactic and people don't want to be divided, they want to be united. & # 39;

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