ENTERTAINMENT

Collectors are crazy about junk salvaged from subway trains while £ 550,000 worth of parts fly off the shelves


Have you ever noticed the storage potential of a London Underground luggage rack at home, or loved the interior of a right-facing Jubilee Line lift button?

Is it that you are not alone? Collectors have become mad about parts recovered from disused subway trains. Merchandise such as seat covers, train station tiles and telephone receivers bring in more than £ 550,000 for the heritage.

The London Transport Museum's sales of luggage racks on the Metropolitan Line alone generated more than half a million pounds, and elevator buttons have also proven popular – with thousands snapped up.

Sales of the Metropolitan Line luggage racks alone generated more than £ half a million for the London Transport Museum (the example pictured shows how the luggage racks can be used at home).

One of the original Metropolitan Line small luggage racks that sold for £ 100 but are now no longer on sale

One of the original Metropolitan Line small luggage racks that sold for £ 100 but are now no longer on sale

Many of the items have become trendy interior decoration features. Photos show luggage racks used for closets and clothes hangers.

The museum is operated under the direction of Transport for London so that decommissioned items can be added to the heritage collection or otherwise sold to the public.

The most expensive offer from & # 39; Railwayana & # 39; are large £ 450 lights that were used in Neasden Depot in north London before being fitted with LED lights.

One of the most popular items is luggage racks from the 1960s that were salvaged from trains on the Metropolitan Line. More than 3,500 of these were sold at a price of £ 100 each, according to a MailOnline Freedom of Information request.

Goods that have flown off the shelves

Overground train driver seat (£ 375): 8 – £ 3000

Jubilee Line Buttons, Right Arrow (£ 25): 1,053 – £ 26,325

Metropolitan Line Luggage Rack – Small (£ 100): 3,554 – £ 355,400

Large size (£ 150): 1,020- £ 153,000

XL station lights (£ 450): 2 – £ 900

Tunnel handset (£ 75): 43 – £ 3225

Sloane Square Station Tile (20): 93- £ 1860

Seat cover (prices vary by style): £ 8,949

GRAND TOTAL – £ 552,686.

The museum has now brought out a replica version which is slightly larger and costs £ 150.

Jubilee Line Lift Buttons were also a surprising success: 1,053 were sold for a total of £ 26,325 while 43 handsets were bought for £ 75 each.

In the days before the cell phones, these were used by drivers to contact themselves and the underground control room.

Samuel Pye, Creative Manager at Architect Echin London, says there are many interior design applications for the items that were recovered, using the luggage racks as an example.

He told MailOnline, “They say that necessity is the mother of invention, which is why designers often take so much inspiration from the useful designs of places like the London Underground.

“The reclaimed luggage racks are a great topic to talk about and, above all, excellent storage for the house, from hallways to bathrooms to utility rooms, kitchens and offices.

“A large percentage of houses in London in the Victorian era were built with high ceilings, but they lack the storage space needed for our now overcrowded lives.

"If you mount these luggage carriers high, you can make the most of these proportions."

Overground train seat sales have been a little slower, eight costing £ 375 each, while 93 tiles from Sloane Square station sold for £ 20 each.

Meanwhile, the seat fabric replica has also been a surprising success, reaching sales of nearly £ 9,000 at £ 30 per square meter.

The most expensive offer from & # 39; Railwayana & # 39; are large £ 450 lights that were used in Neasden Depot in north London before being fitted with LED lights

An overground driver's seat is available for £ 375

The most expensive offer from & # 39; Railwayana & # 39; are large £ 450 lights that were used in Neasden Depot in north London before they were fitted with LED lights (left). An overground driver's seat is available for £ 375

The museum has sold 93 tiles from Sloane Square Station for £ 20 each - with all the money to help fund its work

The museum has sold 93 tiles from Sloane Square Station for £ 20 each – with all the money to help fund its work

This moving goods sign is being offered to transport enthusiasts for an expensive £ 100

This moving goods sign is being offered to transport enthusiasts for an expensive £ 100

Sam Mullins OBE, Director of the London Transport Museum, said: “Every purchase supports the London Transport Museum's work as a charity and helps preserve our iconic collection, from historic vehicles to a world-class collection of 20th century poster art – this is especially important to us in these challenging times. & # 39;

Salvaged goods fans also recently got lucky when British Airways launched a fire sale of its assets amid the financial turmoil caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

The airline sold champagne flutes and fine china formerly used for first class passengers, as well as slippers and trolleys.

The sale came after the airline's owner discovered massive pandemic losses of £ 5.4 billion as of September.

Customers and collectors were able to create an authentic BA first class experience by snapping bespoke on-board foods such as William Edwards plates (from £ 25), soup cups (£ 30), cups (from £ 5) and saucers (£ 5).

Other premium items included the bread basket (£ 42), the bedspread (£ 9) and the trivet (£ 5). And for £ 12 you can buy the top cabin hot towels (which obviously arrive cold).

An original cash drawer salvaged from a subway office - for sale for £ 300

An original cash drawer salvaged from a subway office – for sale for £ 300

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