ENTERTAINMENT

Chris Whitty will warn the UK that it is at "a critical point in the pandemic".


The UK is at a "critical point" in the coronavirus pandemic. Professor Chris Whitty will address the nation tomorrow in a speech as the Prime Minister sets new measures to combat a second devastating wave of coronavirus.

In a television briefing on Monday, the Chief Medical Officer for England will say the country is facing a "very challenging winter" with the current trend being "in the wrong direction".

His sharp warning calling for stricter controls comes after Boris Johnson held talks yesterday with Professor Whitty and chief scientific adviser Sir Patrick Vallance as he is devising a virus control plan for the next six months.

It is believed that the Prime Minister could announce new measures in a press conference on Tuesday.

The new measures come after the mail announced that pubs that violate the rules will be closed immediately if new action is planned.

Bars and restaurants where large groups may or may not be able to collect customer data are served with orders that force them to close immediately. Pictured: People came into town in Nottingham last night

Local authorities and the police are asked to conduct spot checks to ensure that the venues meet the requirements. Pictured: A group of girls walk through Birmingham city center last night

Local authorities and the police are asked to conduct spot checks to ensure that the venues meet the requirements. Pictured: A group of girls walk through Birmingham city center last night

Professor Chris Whitty will say during his televised announcement that the country is facing "a very challenging winter"

Professor Chris Whitty will say during his televised announcement that the country is facing "a very challenging winter"

During his address, Prof. Whitty, who will appear with Sir Patrick Vallance, the government’s main scientific advisor, will explain how the virus is spreading in the UK and what possible scenarios could develop in winter.

They will use data from other countries such as Spain and France, which are seeing a second surge, to underscore how their experience in the UK could be replicated.

Professor Whitty is expected to say, “The UK is trending in the wrong direction and we are at a critical point in the pandemic.

London "Next for Lockdown"

London is on the verge of lockdown and millions of commuters are forced to work from home.

Ministers will decide today whether to lock down the capital and Mayor Sadiq Khan urges "act quickly".

Mr Khan believes the city is just days behind the disease spots in the north-west and north-east of England, and said a new lockdown was "increasingly likely".

However, the infection rate in London of 25 cases per 100,000 people is well below the national average of 34, and no areas of the capital are on Public Health England's “watch list”.

"We're looking at the data to see how the spread of the virus can be managed ahead of a very challenging winter period."

The warning comes after it became known that bars and restaurants where large groups may or may not collect customer data are being served with orders forcing them to close immediately.

Local authorities and the police are asked to conduct spot checks to ensure that the venues meet the requirements.

Downing Street warned last night that the country was "on the last chance" with the prospect of more restrictive national measures such as curfews imposed within days if people fail to obey the rules.

Possible measures are that bars and restaurants have to close at 10pm every evening, as has already happened in places like Bolton and Newcastle. There may also be a ban on coming into contact with people from other households.

The government is preparing a major offensive to enforce the current regulations and minimize the need for further restrictions.

Mr. Hancock warned yesterday: "We will crack down on people who do wrong."

Senior government officials are concerned about scenes of drinkers crowded into bars or standing in large groups outside on the street.

They also fear that many locations are failing to capture the details of customers required by the NHS test and trace service to contact the necessary people when outbreaks are detected at a venue.

Previously, Health Secretary Matt Hancock had refused to rule out a second national lockdown in England if people fail to adhere to social distancing rules.

Another 3,899 laboratory-confirmed cases of coronavirus in the UK were announced on Sunday, while another 18 people died within 28 days of testing positive, bringing the total to 41,777 in the UK.

The latest figures came after the government announced that anyone in England who refuses to obey an order to self-isolate could face a fine of up to £ 10,000.

Mr Hancock said that with hospital admissions doubling for the disease "every eight days or so," more action would be needed to prevent further deaths.

"This country is facing a turning point," he told BBC One's The Andrew Marr Show.

“If everyone obeys the rules – and we will treat people who do not obey the rules more and more strictly – we can avoid further national bans.

"But of course we have to be ready to take action when necessary."

Mr Johnson was desperate to avoid another statewide lockdown as he had concerns about the economic damage it would do if activities began to pick up again.

However, as of Tuesday, around 13.5 million people across the UK will face local restrictions as authorities grapple with the disease.

London Mayor Sadiq Khan is now urging ministers to extend controls to the capital, which he believes are just two or three days behind the hotspots of the north-west and north-east of England.

Mr Hancock said he was "very concerned" with the latest data suggesting the UK could be on the same path as Spain and France – where deaths and hospitalizations are increasing – without effective action.

& # 39; I'm very concerned about this second wave. We have seen in other countries in Europe how it can absolutely shoot through the roof, ”he said.

“If the case rate goes up, the next thing to do is go to the hospital.

"Unfortunately, we've seen that increase double every eight days – people who go to the hospital and with a delay you see the number of people who die sadly rise."

One of the measures being considered by the ministers is a temporary two-week "break" in the circuit with stricter restrictions across England to break the chain of transmission.

However, the government is facing opposition from some senior Conservative MPs who are concerned that ministers with little or no parliamentary scrutiny are assuming increasingly stricter powers.

Sir Graham Brady, chairman of the powerful 1922 Tory Backbench committee, said he would table an amendment that would oblige the government to put new measures on MPs' votes.

Boris Johnson held discussions with Professor Whitty and Senior Scientific Advisor Sir Patrick Vallance yesterday

Boris Johnson held discussions with Professor Whitty and Senior Scientific Advisor Sir Patrick Vallance yesterday

He said he would take the opportunity to try to change the legislation if the government renews emergency powers in the Coronavirus Act 2020.

Under the latest rules, people in England must self-isolate for 14 days from September 28th if they test positive for coronavirus, or they are told to do so by NHS Test and Trace because they have come into contact with someone suffering from the disease.

Fines for violations start at £ 1,000 and rise to £ 10,000 for repeat offenders in the "most egregious" cases.

Beneficiaries are entitled to a one-time benefit of £ 500 if they suffer a loss of income due to quarantine.

Sir Keir Starmer said Labor would back the measures but warned that a second national lockdown was more likely as the test and trace program was on the verge of collapse.

“Now that the government has effectively lost control of the tests, it doesn't necessarily know where the virus is.

"So if I were prime minister I would apologize for having tests carried out everywhere," he told Sky News' Sophy Ridge on Sunday.

As of Friday, local authorities in England have the power to impose fines of up to £ 4,000 on companies that allow in groups of more than six people or do not keep a record of the people served.

However, the Mail believes the government is considering going further by allowing councils to take swift action by ordering premises to be closed immediately.

The ministers are also trying to tighten the law so that people cannot order at the bar or counter. Retailers are asked to encourage customers to meet the requirement to wear face covering in stores.

A cabinet minister said: “People have registered as Donald Duck in pubs and given bogus phone numbers or given no contact details at all. So tough crackdown is required. & # 39;

Starting next week, people will face fines of up to £ 10,000 for refusing an order to self-isolate. Professor Whitty and Sir Patrick will present data on countries like France and Spain experiencing a second wave and how this could be repeated here.

The Mail is known that the government is considering going further by allowing councils to take quick action by ordering premises to be closed immediately. Pictured: Revelers hit the city in Newcastle on Saturday night

The Mail is known that the government is considering going further by allowing councils to take quick action by ordering premises to be closed immediately. Pictured: Revelers hit the city in Newcastle on Saturday night

Mr Hancock (pictured) said there was a risk that the numbers could "shoot through the roof" if effective measures were not taken to stop the virus from spreading

Mr Hancock (pictured) said there was a risk that the numbers could "shoot through the roof" if effective measures were not taken to stop the virus from spreading

A Downing Street source said, "Infection rates are rising, we are in the grip of a second wave of Covid and we are now in the limo of last chance."

They said that Professor Whitty and Sir Patrick would "present today the latest data and the stark reality we are now facing".

Mr Hancock said there was a risk that the numbers could "shoot through the roof" if effective measures are not taken to stop the virus from spreading.

When he appeared on Skys Sophy Ridge on Sunday, he said, "People have gotten more relaxed over the summer" but "now is the time everyone has to come back" to obey the rules.

Another 18 deaths have been reported in people who had tested positive for coronavirus in the previous 28 days. There were 1,141 patients in England's hospitals last night, up from 1,048 the previous day and 661 a week ago.

Almost a third of these patients are in the North West, only 157 in London.

As early as April, there were almost 5,000 coronavirus patients in London hospitals alone and 20,000 across the UK.

Hancock: I would shop for neighbors

Matt Hancock has urged the British to alert police to neighbors who refuse to self-isolate – and said he would too.

The health minister's call came just days after Prime Minister Boris Johnson said he didn't like sneak culture.

Mr Hancock said he would report violations to the authorities himself in order to impose a fine of up to £ 10,000 under strict new regulations in England.

Matt Hancock (pictured) has urged the British to alert police to neighbors who refuse to self-isolate - and said he would too

Matt Hancock (pictured) has urged the British to alert police to neighbors who refuse to self-isolate – and said he would too

His comments came when he was asked on Times Radio if the public should cover people who refuse to self-isolate. "Yes, because the number of people asked to self-isolate as part of the general population is relatively small and so important," Hancock said.

"These are people who have been in close contact with someone who got a positive result or who had a positive test themselves."

Mr Hancock was also asked by Andrew Marr on his BBC show if he would take a neighbor to the police.

The Minister of Health replied: “Yes. And for the part of self-isolation this is absolutely necessary, because that's how we break the chains of transmission. & # 39;

Mr Marr suggested it was "confused news" from the government following Mr Johnson's comments.

Mr. Hancock replied, "We are very sure that people have to obey the rules and if they don't we are bringing in this stricter enforcement."

A "breaker" lockout would be insane

comment From Dr. Renee Hoenderkamp

Of all the confused, panicked, flip-flop government reactions to the Covid-19 pandemic, the introduction of a so-called "breaker" lockdown this week would be the worst yet.

If you close the country for two weeks, a dangerous situation will turn into a disaster.

It's just the wrong thing, right at the wrong time.

Six months ago, when the coronavirus hit the UK, the Prime Minister imposed a draconian lockdown that forced people to stay inside. I warned at the time that these policies would have devastating long-term effects on universal health care – especially mental health – and it saddens me deeply that I was right.

Six months ago, when the coronavirus hit the UK, the Prime Minister (pictured) imposed a draconian lockdown that forced people to stay inside

Six months ago, when the coronavirus hit the UK, the Prime Minister (pictured) imposed a draconian lockdown that forced people to stay inside

What I hadn't foreseen in March was how the lockdown would direct Covid-19 to the very places where Britain's most vulnerable people were sheltered: our nursing homes.

Segments of the population at minimal risk – the young and generally healthy – were the ones who were best protected from infection. The most vulnerable had to bear the brunt of the brunt, and the results were indescribably horrific.

A ban we were promised would not last more than a few weeks and last all summer. We only showed up this month when the schools reopened.

And what happened? Exactly what anyone could predict – the disease came back too. Of course it did because it never went away. It was floating around at a low level, waiting to rise again among a population with no immunity. Now we are seeing an increasing level of infection, similar to what we saw in February at the beginning of the crisis.

But here's the terrible difference: it's the end of September now and winter is just around the corner. The winter comes with the flu and pneumonia, and as every general practitioner knows, they are killers.

Britain doesn't close every year for flu. In fact, we hardly talk about it. Some people have vaccines, others don't mind - in seven of the last ten years the push has been shown to be less than 50 percent effective. Pictured: A sign for a coronavirus testing station in Manchester

Britain doesn't close every year for flu. In fact, we hardly talk about it. Some people have vaccines, others don't mind – in seven of the last ten years the bite has been shown to be less than 50 percent effective. Pictured: A sign for a coronavirus testing station in Manchester

You are already engaging. Two weeks ago, 991 deaths were attributed to flu and pneumonia, Covid-19, or both over a seven-day period, according to the Office of National Statistics.

However, over the same period, the ONS data showed only 78 official deaths of patients who tested positive for Covid-19 in the last month (although that doesn't mean the virus caused all deaths).

Those numbers show that flu and pneumonia are currently about ten times as deadly … and according to the ONS, flu season hasn't even started yet.

The main months are considered October to May and hit the worst spot after Christmas. Britain doesn't close every year for flu. In fact, we hardly talk about it. Some people have vaccines, others don't mind – in seven of the last ten years the bite has been shown to be less than 50 percent effective.

Developing a reliable flu vaccine relies on predicting which particular strains of flu are most likely to occur the following winter and therefore be very off-target. However, this failure is almost never discussed in the media. It is certainly not the cause of national panic.

To think about a nationwide lockdown to fight Covid-19 when the flu and pneumonia are so much more virulent right now is insane. The dire general and mental health effects we suffered over the summer will only intensify.

Since the likelihood of a safe and effective vaccine is hardly feasible in the foreseeable future, we should have sought mass immunity among the healthy population. Pictured: A coronavirus testing center in Leicester

Since the likelihood of a safe and effective vaccine is hardly feasible in the foreseeable future, we should have sought mass immunity among the healthy population. Pictured: A coronavirus testing center in Leicester

And in two weeks, or when we turn off the breaker, the coronavirus will bounce back. This time around, we'll face the ramifications during the flu season, when many more people are affected by the flu and even less able to fight Covid-19.

The ideal time to deal with this new type of coronavirus has already passed. Since the likelihood of a safe and effective vaccine is hardly feasible in the foreseeable future, we should have sought mass immunity among the healthy population.

If the majority of people who are unlikely to have severe side effects can catch the infection and safely overcome it, then it is much less likely to pass it on to those at risk in the winter.

This strategy goes by the ugly name of herd immunity, a callous name for the most compassionate politics.

I am certainly not going to downgrade the severity of Covid-19. It's more contagious than the flu and attacks the body in more diverse ways. This is a scary disease. But we cannot fight it with fear.

We can't wait for a vaccine or hide from the virus. Trying to eradicate an endemic disease with a short circuit barrier is unscientific nonsense (archive image)

We can't wait for a vaccine or hide from the virus. Trying to eradicate an endemic disease with a short circuit barrier is unscientific nonsense (archive image)

We can't fight it with a vaccine right now either. There aren't any, and I have to admit that I would be wary of any vaccinations that haven't been thoroughly tested. I'm passionate about the vaccine and made sure my toddler got every thrust going. However, before they can be considered safe, all drugs must be properly evaluated and that takes time.

We mustn't rush the job just because it makes political sense. Yet that is what the government seems to be doing.

The only safe and humane response is to shield the vulnerable and encourage the rest of the population to build collective immunity.

We can't wait for a vaccine or hide from the virus. Trying to eradicate an endemic disease with a short circuit barrier is unscientific nonsense.

Instead, we need to take care of the most vulnerable people by defending their jobs and paying their bills while they isolate themselves.

Nobody should worry about losing their job or defaulting on their mortgage. The cost of this, while substantial, is minimal compared to the cost of the vacation program.

And while they stay safe, we must all go back to the real world and learn to live with the virus. It's here and it's not going away. Our best defense is collective immunity. Accept it and let's get on with our lives.

Dr. Hoenderkamp is an NHS general practitioner

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