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China's manned submersible Fendouzhe dives 35,790 feet in the Mariana Trench on a record-breaking expedition


A Chinese submersible with three men landed at the bottom of the Mariana Trench – the deepest part of the ocean – after diving 10,909 meters (35,790 feet), according to Chinese state media.

The Fendouzhe or Striver broke the country's record for the deepest crewed dive yesterday after spending nearly four hours in the western Pacific, Beijing state broadcaster CCTV reported.

The expedition was designed to help China explore the abundant natural resources in the deep sea by helping scientists draw a "treasure map".

A screenshot of a news clip from the Chinese state broadcaster CCTV shows the Fendouzhe or Striver preparing to dive into the Pacific to reach the bottom of the Mariana Trench

The picture published by CCTV shows the three researchers on board the Fendouzhe, each holding a food bowl after having sunk in the sea for almost four hours with the submersible

The picture published by CCTV shows the three researchers on board the Fendouzhe, each holding a food bowl after having sunk in the sea for almost four hours with the submersible

The Fendouzhe plunged into the ocean at 8:20 p.m. GMT on Monday and landed on the ocean floor at 12.12 p.m. GMT on Tuesday, CCTV said.

It stayed at the bottom of the trench for more than six hours to collect marine samples and document the surrounding landscape, the official news channel said.

His voyage is 18 meters from the deepest manned dive ever.

The current world record is reportedly held by Victor Vescovo, an American explorer who claimed to have reached a depth of 10,927 meters in the Mariana Trench in May 2019.

Chinese engineers completed the development and assembly of the Fendouzhe in February after starting the project in 2016.

According to a previous CCTV report, the watercraft completed 25 tasks in a three-month experiment from March to June.

A CCTV news clip shows the Fendouzhe diving down the ocean on her record breaking voyage

A CCTV news clip shows the Fendouzhe diving down the ocean on her record breaking voyage

A screen in the Fendouzhe's control room shows that the ship has submerged 10,909 m (35,790 ft).

A screen in the Fendouzhe's control room shows that the ship has submerged 10,909 m (35,790 ft).

After taking off from the southern Chinese city of Sanya on October 10 with two mother ships and an exploration team, the ship crashed 10,058 meters in an experiment on October 27 before making the latest feat, Xinhua reported.

After the four-hour mission, the three on board researchers sent back a group photo in which each of them was holding a bowl of food.

In a conversation with a CCTV reporter from the floor of the Mariana Trench, one of them said: "The three of us are all feeling very good and are currently testing the functions of the robotic arms."

The explorer continued, "The ocean floor is incredible."

The submersible should be able to film its surroundings and use its robotic arms to collect samples of rocks, sea water, marine animals and plants.

Ye Cong, the Fendouzhe's chief engineer, told CCTV, “The Fendouzhe took less than 200 minutes to reach the sea floor.

The submersible was traveling on the ocean floor and performing relevant work. The overall performance of the entire submersible was very stable. & # 39;

The & # 39; Deep-Sea Warrior & # 39; (Picture) is China's second manned deep-sea submersible. It was expected that after a series of experiments it would visit the deepest point in the Mariana Trench

The & # 39; Deep-Sea Warrior & # 39; (Picture) is China's second manned deep-sea submersible. It was expected that after a series of experiments it would visit the deepest point in the Mariana Trench

Mr. Ye is also the chief engineer of China's deep-sea diving project, a program launched in 2016 to develop some of the world's most advanced ocean exploration machines.

He previously claimed that exploring ocean trenches could help scientists draw a "treasure map" for the ocean floor, signaling the country's ambition to search for natural resources in the most mysterious parts of the world.

Another dive boat with a Chinese crew, Shen Hai Yong Shi, or "Deep Sea Warrior", was supposed to visit the deepest point in the Mariana Trench after a series of experiments. State news agency The Global Times reportedly reported earlier in its year.

The machine should take on the Challenger Deep, which has an estimated depth of 11,033 meters (36,200 feet).

The Challenger Deep is probably the most foreign part of the world and largely unknown to humans.

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