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British tourists who are still flying to Spain say that they handle Covid-19 better than Britain


British tourists said today that they would still fly to Spain so they wouldn't lose their money – despite Boris Johnson's warning, there could be a second wave and the need to quarantine two weeks when they come back.

Although thousands of people canceled their vacation plans after ministers warned of the new restrictions only five hours ago, others remained determined to leave.

Holidaymakers who left Manchester Airport today said they would feel safer in Spain because it was better for corona viruses than in the UK, while others complained that travel companies refused to refund.

The 54-year-old Nigel Hunt traveled with his family to their villa in Fuerteventura. He said to MailOnline: “We played with the idea for a long time and decided that we were safer there than here.

"We live near Blackburn and Hyndburn, where the cases are increasing so we feel safer in Fuerteventura."

Mr. Johnson defended his decision today and insisted that Europe show "signs of a second wave" while Nicola Sturgeon said she was not going to book a vacation abroad because of concerns that the rules could change again soon.

The Prime Minister said: "We have to act quickly and decisively if we believe the risks are blowing up again.

"Let us make it absolutely clear what is happening in Europe among some of our European friends. I am afraid that you are beginning to see signs of a second wave of the pandemic in some places."

In other developments today –

  • Popular UK locations have been overflowing with bookings, with some websites fully reserved by next year.
  • Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez said the country was "safe" and criticized the new measures as "mistakes" and "unjust".
  • Coronavirus cases in the city of Oldham in Greater Manchester rose 240 percent in the week ending July 25.
  • The UK recorded 12 more Covid deaths in a provisional number as weekly coronavirus deaths dropped to another low.
  • British Airways faced an "immediate" strike threat when Unite members rejected plans to cut 12,000 jobs.

The 54-year-old Nigel Hunt was at Manchester Airport today and traveled with his family to their villa in Fuerteventura. Also shown are his wife Helen (far right) and his children Gracie (left) and Mason

Erica Thompson, a caregiver from Wigan, Greater Manchester, flew to Fuerteventura to visit her parents

Dan Guzlinski said it would have cost £ 1,000 to change his goal

Erica Thompson, a caregiver from Wigan, Greater Manchester, flew to Fuerteventura to visit her parents. Dan Guzlinski (right) said it would have cost £ 1,000 to change his goal

Nigel Hunt, who runs his own business and comes from the Ribble Valley in Lancashire, said he felt more comfortable because the family went to their own vacation home.

The Spanish prime minister says quarantine is "unjust" and claims that tourists in his country are SAFE than in the UK after the FCO changed conflicting advice and urged the British not to travel to islands

Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez

Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez

The Spanish prime minister has classified the quarantine restrictions as "unjust" and has said that tourists in his country will be safer than in the UK as ministers are preparing to reduce the quarantine from 14 days to 10 days in order to take short breaks for millions of families save.

Pedro Sanchez yesterday evening criticized the government's sudden decision to force the British returning from Spain to stay at home for two weeks and urged the government to reconsider their decision.

Quarantined tourists fear that 14 days of self-isolation could cost them paid work, and there is concern that the newly imposed rules could end the summer vacation season.

Shortly after the Federal Foreign Office tightened its stance and advised against non-essential trips to all of Spain, including the Balearic Islands and the Canary Islands, Sanchez told the Spanish television station Telecinco on Monday evening: “I think the UK's decision is wrong.

“Spain is made up of a number of regions with a cumulative infection rate that is below both the European and the British average.

& # 39; The Spanish tourism industry has acted very responsibly in the past few months, sending a safety message related to the health emergency we are experiencing.

"It is true that the coronavirus pandemic continues to show very worrying developments on a global level and also on a European level, but the spread of the virus is not uniform in Spain.

"Sixty-two percent of new cases occur in two regions, but in the majority of the country, the cumulative incidence of the virus is below the European average and the British average."

His wife Helen, who works for the Lancashire County Council, said: "We'll be there by August 17th, but if nothing changes, I'll be home a week early so I can use part of my vacation as quarantine.

& # 39; We managed to take out travel insurance that covers us. I think we'll be safer out there than at home. & # 39;

Boris Johnson decided to reintroduce a quarantine for the move to Spain after it was found that 10 British coronaviruses had returned from the country.

Chief Medical Officer Professor Chris Whitty declared the number "statistically significant" and said "doing nothing is not an option".

However, many tourists who left for Manchester Airport in Spain today were determined not to cancel their travel plans.

36-year-old steelworker Dan Guzlinski from Southport, Merseyside, wanted to go to Tenerife with his family.

“If we don't go, we'll lose our money because the vacation hasn't been canceled. We tried to change the target, but it would have cost an additional £ 1,000.

"We are going for two weeks and as things are at the moment, I think we will be safer there."

Erica Thompson, a caregiver from Wigan, Greater Manchester, flew to Fuerteventura to visit her parents.

She said: "I think the Spanish government has a better grip than our own.

“Everyone has to wear masks and the army is on the street to enforce social distancing measures. You do it right.

“Our government messed up a bit right from the start. I still don't think they got things right. & # 39;

Ms. Thompson, who has been visiting her parents for four days, added: “People take it seriously and abide by the rules.

In Britain, people had parties, the family came to their homes and generally didn't follow the rules.

“I'm not sure if I have to isolate myself when I get home because a friend told me I was on the exception list, but I have to see. I will have to see what the work says. & # 39;

The 30-year-old Kieran Alexander from Manchester flies to Tenerife with his friend Alex Jackson for two weeks.

He said: "We meet friends who are already over there. We managed to get insurance that was a little more expensive to insure ourselves and decided to leave. We just want to get on the plane and get over there. & # 39;

Mr. Jackson, 37, added: “We tried to get our money back, but we can't. We tried to contact On The Beach for two weeks but no one contacted us, which is a shame.

& # 39; We were completely ignored by them. Ryanair is still flying, so we would have lost £ 1,200 in total.

"I have to quarantine when I get back, but that's fine because I can work from home."

The latest figures show that the number of new cases in Spain is increasing rapidly. At the weekend, 6,361 new cases were announced, compared to 4,581 the previous year. France announced 2,551 new coronavirus cases on Monday

The latest figures show that the number of new cases in Spain is increasing rapidly. At the weekend, 6,361 new cases were announced, compared to 4,581 the previous year. France announced 2,551 new coronavirus cases on Monday

Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez has claimed that tourists in his country are safer than in the UK. These are the worst coronavirus hotspots in each country and the number of coronavirus cases per 100,000 people

Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez has claimed that tourists in his country are safer than in the UK. These are the worst coronavirus hotspots in each country and the number of coronavirus cases per 100,000 people

Britain's decision to remove Spain from its safe travel list has sparked a diplomatic war between Madrid and London.

Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez said that the UK's blanket ban on all non-essential travel to Spain is a "mistake" and "unfair".

But this morning, Mr Johnson insisted that the British government act quickly to respond to what they believed to be a threat to the domestic fight against the corona virus.

He said: “We have to act quickly and decisively if we believe that the risks are blowing up again.

Ministers insist that the 14-day quarantine rules remain, although the self-isolation period for claims could be reduced to 10 days

Ministers today insisted that travelers returning to the UK from unsafe coronavirus countries to quarantine for 14 days continue to insist, despite claims that the self-isolation period could soon be shortened.

Overnight reports indicated that the government is considering reducing the quarantine from 14 to 10 days to make family vacation abroad more practical.

The proposals provide for returning travelers to be tested eight days after they land. If the check is negative, they are given the green light to leave their homes two days later.

It is believed that a four-day shave in the fortnightly quarantine period could be enough to convince some vacationers to continue traveling despite increasing uncertainty about overseas travel.

The government fears that its sudden decision to reinstate the quarantine rules for the British returning from Spain will result in mass cancellations and end the summer vacation.

But local government minister Simon Clarke said this morning that "the situation remains that the government's advice is that you have to be quarantined for 14 days."

He said to Sky News: "I don't want to blur this message. That is the current position. With all of these guides, of course, we continue to take advice on science and best practices that make sense.

"But we don't want to get any mixed messages out there today: it's a 14-day quarantine."

"Let us make it absolutely clear what is happening in Europe among some of our European friends. I am afraid that you are beginning to see signs of a second wave of the pandemic in some places."

In the meantime, Mr. Johnson insisted that it was up to the individual to decide whether to go abroad this summer given the growing uncertainty.

He said, "These are decisions for families, for individuals, about where they want to go."

He added: “It is important that people returning from abroad and returning from a place where I fear there is another outbreak will need to be quarantined.

"That is why we have taken the measures we have and we will take measures throughout the summer where necessary."

The Spanish government today insisted that Spain remain a safe travel destination for tourists as Germany imposed travel restrictions on its European neighbor.

Berlin has associated foreign holidays with a "worrying" increase in cases in Germany and has now advised its citizens to avoid the regions of Catalonia, Aragon and Navarre – but not the south coast or the Spanish islands.

The government announced on Saturday that it would tighten the rules for travel to Spain due to the increasing number of cases.

However, the ministers were accused of leading the chaos after initially banning entry to mainland Spain. However, entry into the Canary and Balearic Islands was still permitted.

Anyone returning to the UK from anywhere in Spain was nevertheless told to be quarantined for 14 days.

The Federal Foreign Office then moved last night to tighten the travel advice for the Spanish islands and to adapt them to the rules applicable to the mainland.

The British make up more than a fifth of foreign visitors to Spain, which is heavily dependent on tourism, and Madrid said the British government had not warned that the quarantine step would take place last weekend.

Mr Sanchez told Monday night Spanish television station Telecinco: "I think the UK's decision is wrong.

“Spain is made up of a number of regions with a cumulative infection rate that is below both the European and the British average.

& # 39; The Spanish tourism industry has acted very responsibly in the past few months, sending a safety message related to the health emergency we are experiencing.

"It is true that the coronavirus pandemic continues to show very worrying developments on a global level and also on a European level, but the spread of the virus is not uniform in Spain."

Mr Sanchez said the Spanish government is pushing for the UK to reverse its decision, saying that "epidemiological terms make it safer to go on holiday in certain parts of Spain" than in the UK.

"We will continue to talk because we are friends and have many commercial and economic links as well as geopolitical links," he said.

A spokeswoman for the Spanish government today insisted that the country was still a safe place for tourists.

The spokeswoman said, "We are a sure target that has made preparations and strengthened to deal with the virus and any outbreaks."

She added: "All figures show that the situation is good in most countries where the regional authorities have registered a low incidence of the disease."

Boris Johnson, who was pictured visiting Beeston near Nottingham today, has warned that there are "signs of a second wave" of corona viruses in Europe

British Airways faces an "immediate" strike threat as Unite warns of job cuts

British Airways was today faced with an "immediate" strike threat from union bosses for job cuts, fearing that families trying to plan a vacation abroad could experience further travel chaos.

Len McCluskey, chairman of Unite, claimed that BA boss Alex Cruz "released a schedule to fire and re-hire thousands of your workforce on August 7".

Mr McCluskey also told how MPs and newspapers equally condemned the Spanish boss's actions, adding, "Perhaps you don't understand that the British sense of fair play is deep in the psyche of the British people."

It is because the British government has advised against traveling to Spain after the appearance of a second wave of coronavirus in parts of the country.

BA has so far taken advantage of government vacation programs, received £ 300m in UK government loans and discontinued its fleet of 747 jumbo jets earlier than planned.

The airline, which is owned by the International Airlines Group, has also implemented a large layoff plan after originally announcing to cut up to 12,000 roles.

Diplomatic relations were tense after local government minister Simon Clarke said the United Kingdom disagreed with Mr. Sanchez's assessment that the trip to Spain should continue.

Mr. Clarke told the BBC: "We respectfully disagree with the position of the Spanish government in this regard.

“We obviously continue to work closely with them and wish them much success in dealing with this outbreak, but we have seen a very large increase in cases in Spain.

& # 39; A 75 percent increase in cases reported between mid-last week and late last week. That is why we have taken the measures we have.

“Of course, you have to make decisions nationwide.

"There will be an internal transfer within Spain and it is important that we do our utmost to protect the public."

Ministers decided on Saturday to reintroduce quarantine restrictions for Spain after it was found that 10 British coronaviruses had returned from the country, and Professor Chris Whitty said: "Doing nothing is not an option."

The government's Covid-O Committee met last weekend after Health Minister Matt Hancock raised concerns about an increase in Spanish infections on Friday.

The group of six high-ranking ministers, including Michael Gove, Grant Shapps and Priti Patel, was apparently informed by Prof. Whitty, the chief medical officer, that the situation in Spain had worsened in the past 48 hours.

Ministers were told that 15 out of 19 Spanish regions saw an increase in infections, but the "mastermind" was the fact that 10 Britons had tested positive recently when they returned from the country.

Prof. Whitty described the number as "statistically significant" as ministers made the controversial decision to quarantine Spanish travelers less than five hours in advance.

The report of the meeting came when Minister of Transport Shapps said he would be returning from his vacation in Spain tomorrow morning as concerns grew that vacation in France and Germany could also be canceled due to rising infection rates.

There is also increasing speculation that travel to Belgium may soon be impacted after the country has slowed down its coronavirus lockdown strategy.

The British government has now banned all non-essential trips to mainland Spain and the Spanish islands. Pictured today is a quiet beach in the resort of Portinatx in Ibiza

The British government has now banned all non-essential trips to mainland Spain and the Spanish islands. Pictured today is a quiet beach in the resort of Portinatx in Ibiza

There were many empty deckchairs on the Costa Del Sol today, which were usually at the height of the holiday season

There were many empty deckchairs on the Costa Del Sol today, which were usually at the height of the holiday season

Don't book a vacation abroad unless you can afford to throw the money away. Warn experts as the UK's whereabouts are overcrowded and fully booked next year

Mark duel for MailOnline

The British were warned today not to book a vacation abroad unless they can afford to lose the money if they dream of a summer vacation that is now at stake.

Concerns about travel restrictions abroad increased when British tourism chiefs warned the British to make their "stay" reservations as soon as possible next year. Families book UK vacation dates in 2021, though the cost of some stays increases 50 percent as operators try to offset some of their lockout losses.

Campsites, B & Bs and cottages across Britain are also running out as vacations postponed during the closure are now being rebooked for next year.

Up to 14 million Britons are expected to vacation in the UK before the children go back to school in September. This gives the country's economy a boost of £ 3.7 billion. Havens says bookings in the 36 parks increased 96 percent year over year. Demand for caravan sites in Devon rose 140 percent, and bookings at locations in Butlins also increased.

Guy Anker of MoneySavingExpert told The Times: “People who booked a vacation or took out insurance after mid-March will not be covered by a local ban or a decision to change travel advice.

"My advice would be not to spend any money that you can't afford to lose at the moment, or if flexibility isn't written into your plane ticket or hotel booking."

British vacation agent Hoseasons said it hired additional telesales personnel to meet the additional demand with bookings for next year, which have increased by a third at normal levels.

Bookings for vacation rentals rose 223 percent last month compared to the same period in 2019, while call volume is more than ten times the normal level.

The empty Jet2 check-in desk at Edinburgh Airport this morning after telling British tourists not to travel to Spain

The empty Jet2 check-in desk at Edinburgh Airport this morning after telling British tourists not to travel to Spain

Jet2 staff are standing at Edinburgh Airport's check-in counter today, according to the new UK policy not to travel to Spain

Jet2 staff are standing at Edinburgh Airport's check-in counter today, according to the new UK policy not to travel to Spain

Charles Millward, owner of Staycation Holidays, which manages 120 properties in the UK, told The Times: "People should be concerned about availability next year."

He added that from March to September, accommodation only has three weekends off next year and the stay "has suddenly become massive for us this summer".

What can I do if I have booked a vacation in Spain?

Can I get a refund on my flights?

The airlines refuse to cancel flights to Spain – although the government advises against all but essential travel.

The move levitates hundreds of thousands of British families and threatens to lose thousands of pounds. It also conflicts with the British government by ignoring a public security edict. The government issued the travel warning after the appearance of a second wave of corona viruses in parts of Spain.

Customers would normally expect travel agents to cancel flights and offer refunds. But all major airlines that have suffered massive losses after the collapse of air traffic have insulted the government and continue to offer the flights. This means that families may lose their vacation and money.

People could ignore the government and take their flights. But they would have to be quarantined for 14 days when they come back and their travel insurance may be invalid. Alternatively, you can cancel your trip with no refund guarantee.

Can I change my flight date or change my destination?

British Airways and easyJet have proposed offering vouchers for future flights instead of a refund for those who cancel.

Ryanair has refused to offer anything. It has even been suggested that people who have changed their flights could charge up to £ 95 per person.

What if I have booked a package tour?

If you have booked a package tour that cannot be carried out as planned, you are entitled to a refund that must be returned within 14 days.

However, some airlines have not canceled flights, and some tour operators do. This means that you may not be able to get a no-fight refund.

Companies are expected to cancel vacation packages to Spain and its islands and offer refunds. An estimated 1.8 million bookings are affected.

Tui has suspended all trips to Spain until August 9th. Customers traveling can cancel or change vacations and receive a full refund or the option to rebook their vacations with a booking incentive and our customer. The service team will proactively notify these customers by email.

Jet2 and Tui canceled trips until certain dates in August. Although Kuoni does not cancel trips, it does offer refunds or changes later.

Can I cancel a direct hotel booking?

If you have booked directly with a hotel, you are unlikely to be able to cancel without respecting the cancellation fee.

You could try to appeal to their goodwill, and it certainly doesn't hurt to ask. For example, you can set a later time.

If you have booked through a third party website such as Booking.com, Expedia or Lastminute, the cancellation policy may be more generous depending on the type of reservation you made.

If neither option is offered, contact your travel insurer to find out if you can claim your policy instead.

Will my insurance cover that?

Only Nationwide FlexPlus travel insurance, which has a checking account of GBP 13 per month, covers trips canceled due to a change in advice from the Federal Foreign Office after a booking. It also covers trips canceled due to a local block.

Other policies from Trailfinders, Nationwide, Axa, All Clear, Coverwise and Insure For apply to corona virus cancellations, but not due to a change in government travel restrictions.

The Civil Aviation Authority said nothing can be done to ensure that those who book only one flight will receive a refund. Recovery of money from travel insurance has been suggested, but most insurers have clauses that deny corona virus claims.

The Association of British Insurers (ABI) has stated that it is "likely" that travel insurance for vacationers who are already in Spain will continue until they return home. However, anyone who tries to travel to countries against FCO advice will void their travel insurance.

According to the ABI, people who have booked a trip or taken out travel insurance after Covid-19 was declared a pandemic may not be insured for travel interruptions or cancellations. In both cases, travelers should check with their insurer.

What if my trip is not canceled but I want to cancel it?

If your trip is not canceled, first contact your travel agent to find out if they are offering refunds or changing the date again.

If not, you may have to accept the cost of canceling your vacation and fighting for a refund from your insurance company, credit card provider under section 75 or a chargeback offered by some banks.

While most travel providers have still not shown their hand, it is believed that most will cancel the holidays on government advice.

What should I do if I am already in Spain?

People currently on vacation in Spain were asked to follow local regulations, return home as usual, and check the FCO's travel advice on gov.uk for more information.

The FCO does not advise those who are already traveling to Spain to leave the country. Abta – the British travel association – advised customers in the country to continue their vacation and to return as usual.

What if I go on vacation somewhere else?

The FCO continues to discourage non-essential international travel, except to the countries and territories on its exception list.

Local government minister Simon Clarke, however, said that vacationers traveling abroad during the coronavirus outbreak must accept that there is some degree of uncertainty.

He said that people on vacation should understand that when they return they may be asked to isolate themselves and that the government must reserve the right to protect the British public.

Jim McMahon, Secretary for Shadow Transport, said that anyone who makes travel arrangements must recognize the restrictions that the government can impose on their return to the UK.

What happens when I come back from Spain?

When you return to the UK from Spain, you will need to provide your travel and contact details and isolate yourself for 14 days. This can soon drop to 10 days.

You can be fined up to £ 100 if you refuse to provide your contact details, or more if you violate this rule more than once.

You can also be fined up to £ 1,000 if you refuse to isolate yourself or if you are subjected to further action.

Will my employer pay me if I have to be quarantined?

This depends on your employer and its rules. For example, if you can still work from home, there should theoretically be no problem with your quarantine.

However, you are not automatically entitled to your employer's statutory sickness benefit if you have to be put in quarantine after the vacation, according to the advice, mediation and arbitration service.

Some employers offer sick pay – either legally or at a higher level, depending on their policy.

If your employer is unable to offer you sick pay, you may be able to take annual leave to avoid missing a payment. However, this may not be possible if you run out of money.

However, Foreign Minister Dominic Raab said that no worker who follows quarantine instructions should be punished by employers, even if he is paid sick.

Warwick-based writer and broadcaster Sally Jones told ITV's Good Morning Britain: "I think it is absolutely crazy to encourage people to go abroad if we don't know which countries will be closed where. Quarantine, for example, comes from Croatia or come back to France.

& # 39; There are wonderful, wonderful places in England. I think most people don't know their own country that well. & # 39;

She added: "Why not explore places like Scotland or the beaches of Northumberland? There are these incredible places in England – most of us have never been there. & # 39;

British campsites also saw a boom in bookings as people quit traveling abroad.

The Pitchup.com website, which sends 800,000 people to 2,000 campsites in the UK each year, said Sunday bookings for a single day were twice as high as last year.

Around 6,100 bookings were required, which corresponds to around 18,000 people, an increase of 20 percent over the previous Sunday. Booking platform founder Dan Yates said there was a clear move to Staycations.

He said: “For many who are just considering booking a trip abroad, this is likely to be the nail in the coffin, as the change in regulations fundamentally affects consumer confidence overseas.

"The tense financial climate means that British holidaymakers are unlikely to take the risk of not being able to work when they return, which is likely to have caused UK bookings to increase this weekend."

The website also offers bookings for campsites across Europe.

Mr. Yates said: & # 39; The tourism and hospitality sector has been decimated by Covid and our Spanish website owners are in turmoil.

& # 39; They believe that a more localized approach, focusing on quarantine in the specific regions affected by the Covid Summits, would have been a more appropriate and effective response from the UK government.

"However, this is good news for domestic campsites and caravan parks as thousands will replace a UK holiday abroad."

Mr. Yates said: "The ever-changing guidelines are likely to create mass confusion and concern among the British, and many will likely choose to play it safe and stay closer to their homes this year."

Airbnb said that for weekend bookings from 27/28. June was more than 70 percent stays.

A spokesman said: & # 39; Staycations are great for Brits who want to explore beyond their own four walls again, but also for the hotel and Airbnb hosts who depend on the revenue from the listing on our platform.

"We have seen a significant increase in demand as travel becomes a reality again. Our trend destinations show that people want to explore the many interesting cities and rural areas the country has to offer, and offer a welcome boost to local businesses. "

Defaqto's Brian Brown gave advice to those worried about vacationing in Spain and said, “If you're in Spain now, your insurance will cover you as usual. This includes cuts and medical claims. However, there will be no restriction if you just want to get home early.

“However, you will not receive compensation from your travel insurer for forced quarantine when you return to the UK.

“If you're driving to Spain by car, you may have problems.

“If you enter Spain after the FCO advises you against it, you have no insurance coverage at all, including health insurance.

"So when you drive through France to Spain, you should turn around and come home or find another place for your vacation."

He added that those who have a booking to Spain but cannot travel now because the FCO has advised against it should go to the travel agent first.

Mr. Brown continued: “Airlines and package operators are likely to cancel the flight / vacation. You should ask for a refund or move your vacation to another destination or time.

"If you can't get a refund, e.g. For example, if you booked your accommodation directly with the hotel, your travel insurance may be paid, but only if the policy covers you for a change in government advice and you have booked the vacation and previously bought the insurance. The FCO changed their advice.

& # 39; You need to check the wording of your insurance policy.

"If you plan to travel somewhere else where the FCO currently says you can go but don't want to take any chances now, travel cancellation insurance won't cover you. The aversion to travel is not an insured danger. & # 39;

Meanwhile, GoCompare Travel Insurance's Sally Jaques said: “If a holiday company still brings customers to mainland Spain, which is currently against FCO advice, these vacationers are between a stone and a hard place.

"They cannot cancel their vacation and claim their vacation expenses in their insurance. If you travel to a destination classified as an area where it is recommended to avoid all non-essential trips, you will void your travel insurance.

“If you fall ill abroad, have an accident, or have lost or stolen your luggage, your insurer is unlikely to make a claim.

“The best option for holidaymakers in this situation who don't want to take the risk is to request a rebooking of their trip later when the pandemic is hoped to have subsided or at least the situation will become clearer. However, holiday companies are not obliged to do so.

& # 39; The sudden turnaround in advice on traveling to mainland Spain and the quarantine requirements for all of Spain, including its islands, show how unpredictable overseas travel is currently.

& # 39; Customers booking vacation somewhere this summer run the risk of their trips being canceled or being left in an almost impossible situation, of not wanting to travel, of ignoring their tour operator's FCO advice and their insurance while away invalidate.

"To be honest, everyone who decides to go abroad this year is playing a game of chance."

In a severe blow to the domestic and international tourism industry, ministers extended travel restrictions to the Spanish islands and warned that further vacation destinations could follow.

The Federal Foreign Office is now warning of "anything but essential" trips to the Balearic and Canary Islands, which have already done this for the mainland.

This is in addition to the 14-day quarantine upon return.

The travel company Jet2 responded to the dictation by canceling flights to all Spanish destinations and asked passengers not to go to the airport.

Downing Street warned, "Unfortunately, no travel is risk-free during this pandemic."

Sources said there were "no immediate plans" to change travel and quarantine advice to other countries.

However, Croatia and Belgium are worrying and the ministers are also monitoring France and Germany. Last night, Grant Shapps canceled his own vacation in Spain to deal with the crisis.

The Minister of Transport, whose wife and children continue their vacation without him, has to be quarantined at home for two weeks.

He told the mail that he felt "not right" and would go on vacation if others ruined her plans. Cabinet Minister Michael Gove canceled a trip to the Balearic Islands on Saturday.

Ministers faced a backlash from travel experts and the aviation industry last night over the "chaotic" approach to airlift policy that has only existed for three weeks.

Tourists look around the village of Boscastle in Cornwall yesterday on a rainy day while people are staying all over the UK

Tourists look around the village of Boscastle in Cornwall yesterday on a rainy day while people are staying all over the UK

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