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British students come to Westminster on the third day of angry protests


Hundreds of angry students have come to London for a third day of angry protests to downgrade thousands of high school diplomas based on an algorithm.

Young protesters in Parliament Square put up banners and placards with pictures of Gavin Williamson urging the Education Secretary to “come out” and be fired.

Many described the lowering of results as "classic" and sang "Justice for the Working Class" as they sat on the floor in front of the Ministry of Education.

It comes as Prime Minister Boris Johnson was urged by Labour's Shadow Education Secretary Kate Green to get a grip on herself.

Ministers have been charged with making a "backdoor sturgeon" by allowing students to challenge the results based on grades predicted by their teachers.

But Ofqual has dramatically suspended its criteria for students hoping to challenge their A-Level grades based on their results in mock exams hours after they said they might be able to do so.

Some students and parents try to resolve the mayhem in court while slamming the "ridiculous and insane" algorithm for calculating the grades.

Young protesters picked up banners and placards with pictures of Gavin Williamson calling for the Education Secretary to be sacked today in Parliament Square in central London

Others called for "Justice for State Schools" to get a good grade amid the ongoing battle over the zip code lottery

Others called for "Justice for State Schools" to get a good grade amid the ongoing battle over the zip code lottery

Protesters take part in a peaceful demonstration in Parliament Square in central London in response to Thursday's A-Level scores being downgraded

"Give me back my grades" and "demote Williamson, not students" posters were waved as students and parents unpacked Parliament Square today

"Give me back my grades" and "demote Williamson, not students" posters were waved as students and parents unpacked Parliament Square today

London protesters replicated in Edinburgh and Cardiff (pictured) today called on the government to "recognize the disproportionate nature of grades in deprived areas and their detrimental effects on society".

London protesters replicated in Edinburgh and Cardiff (pictured) today called on the government to "recognize the disproportionate nature of grades in deprived areas and their detrimental effects on society".

A protester stands with her self-made sign with a picture of the Prime Minister, branding him a "classic" and saying, "Britain deserves better".

A protester stands with her self-made sign with a picture of the Prime Minister, branding him a "classic" and saying: "Britain deserves better"

The final demand of today's protest was: "All universities should keep more offers and allow time to complete the appointment process."

The final demand of today's protest was: "All universities should keep more offers and allow time to complete the appointment process."

During today's demonstration, lively students in Westminster crowd with signs reading "Teachers Know Best" and "Trust Teachers, Not Tories"

During today's demonstration, lively students in Westminster crowd with signs reading “Teachers Know Best” and “Trust Teachers, Not Tories”

Repeated protesters in Edinburgh and Cardiff today called on the government to "recognize the disproportionate nature of grades in deprived areas and their negative impact on society".

They also want Ofqual to "recognize the unrealistic approach the government has taken to resignations and appointments".

What are the protests asking of the government?

Acknowledge the disproportionate nature of grades in deprived areas and their detrimental effects on society

  • Students living in poorer areas were most likely downgraded.
  • The common counter is that poorer areas are routinely overpredicted. However, predictions and teacher graded grades are not comparable, and students in these areas had mostly smaller increases in A * than those in richer areas.
  • In Tower Hamlets, every single school in chemistry was downgraded by at least one, while in some independent schools their students' CAGs were not downgraded.
  • This shows that the moderation system penalizes these lower income students and essentially created a zip code lottery for classes where the price of your home gave you a far more likely chance of winning the jackpot.

Acknowledge the unrealistic approach the government has taken to resignations and appeals

  • Repetition during treatment of a pandemic and after several months of restricted access to resources would largely affect outcomes / outcomes.
  • The government's failure to prepare and understand the needs of young people has created significant stress. This is a time when many are already isolated due to lockdowns and showing a fundamental lack of care for young people and their mental health and wellbeing.
  • There was no appeal process ready, which was incredibly stressful for students with such ambiguities, and when it was implemented late, this lack of preparation showed in poor quality and negative effects.
  • We want the government to fund resources for all students completing their degrees so that they have ample time to prepare for their exams if they choose to retake them and provide them with the support they could expect if they had taken them off in the summer as planned.

Encourage all universities to honor more offers and to allow time for them complete the complaints procedure

  • Officially consider the CAGs.
  • Despite constant government assurances that universities would be more lenient with students in the current circumstances, this appears to be inconsistent, with some of these institutions accepting all students regardless of their grades and rejecting other students from near misses.
  • In a year when the accuracy of grades is nearly impossible, students cannot be penalized for failing to meet these standards.
  • In addition, many students who were demoted, especially in competitive courses like Medicine, were reassured by Gavin Williamson that their bogus grades could appeal to them. However, the students have now been informed that their seat is already gone. An appointment process is meaningless if the student has already been denied a place at the university.

And her final demand was that "all universities should take more offers and allow time to complete the appointment process".

One comment on their mission statement read: "As a student body we don't want any pats or puffed grades, we only want what we deserve and not be punished and massively change the future of our lives through an incompetent grading system."

Organizer Stanley Lewis told MailOnline: & # 39; We want to produce fair and unbiased results for students.

“Our generation is disappointed by biased algorithms that don't reflect our teachers' recommendations or our hard work.

"I and my colleagues have not only been downgraded, but also run the risk of losing university places."

The high school graduate, predicted an A * and two As but given three As, added, “We cannot sit still and let this happen. We have to stand up and hope that our voices will be heard by those responsible. & # 39;

Maya Szollosy, 18, from London, said: “We choose the age now, most of us, and we are young.

"We'll remember that for many years to come before the general election, and I don't think many students will vote for the Conservative Party after what they did to us."

A science teacher with GCSE students in London said she was at the demonstration next week before results day for her students.

The woman, who refused to give her name, said, “I think this is the biggest attack on the working class, probably since Thatcher, or at least the most brazen.

“This will be particularly devastating for the working class, including black and ethnic minority students.

"I've seen up to two million GCSE children potentially downgraded so I'm so scared for them, my heart breaks for these kids."

In response to the protests this afternoon, union leader Sir Keir Starmer tweeted: “Weeks of chaos, confusion and incompetence.

& # 39; We need a return to teacher ratings for A-level scores and urgent action to avoid the same injustice for GCSE students.

& # 39; Boris Johnson was invisible during this crisis. He has to take personal responsibility and resolve it. & # 39;

The shadowing secretary, Ms. Green, urged Mr. Johnson to "get a grip" and resolve the exam crisis.

She said in a statement, "The Tories fiasco" is turning from tragedy to farce, and the chaos and incompetence are totally unacceptable when so many students and families are devastated by it.

“A credible appeals system should have been the government's first priority, but three days later there is absolutely no clarity on how young people can challenge their unfair grades.

“Parents and teenagers needed action within a few days, but the government is running out of time now. The Prime Minister has to get this under control and sort it out. & # 39;

Angela Rayner, Assistant Director of Operations, added, “Gavin Williamson's handling of this year's exam results has been a complete and utter fiasco. We have had weeks of chaos, confusion, and incompetence.

& # 39; And yet Boris Johnson was nowhere to be seen. He's been watching from the sidelines as a generation of young people are robbed of their futures.

“We can't have another week like this. The Prime Minister must now take personal responsibility for this crisis by reaching out to the country within the next 24 hours to explain exactly how he will end this historic injustice.

“No student should be worse off because of government failure. What we need is a return to the teachers' assessments of this year's A-Level results and urgent action to avoid repeating injustices from hundreds of thousands of GCSE students this week. & # 39;

Protesters (pictured today in London) want Ofqual to "acknowledge the government's unrealistic approach to resits and appeals".

Protesters (pictured today in London) want Ofqual to "acknowledge the government's unrealistic approach to resits and appeals".

A-level student and protest organizer Stanley Lewis (pictured today in Westminster) told MailOnline that he dropped one of his grades but was mainly there to support others who were more affected

A-level student and protest organizer Stanley Lewis (pictured today in Westminster) told MailOnline that he dropped one of his grades but was mainly there to support others who were more affected

Hundreds of protesters gathered today with their posters held high in central London urging Gavin Williamson to resign from the Ministry of Education

Hundreds of protesters gathered today with their posters held high in central London urging Gavin Williamson to resign from the Ministry of Education

Protesters march through central London holding up their homemade signs after their grades fell on Thursday

Protesters march through central London holding up their homemade signs after their grades fell on Thursday

Two voters in masks stand in front of the Ministry of Education building and hold a sign that reads: "Remember, I am a voter now."

Two voters in masks stand in front of the Ministry of Education building and hold a sign that reads: "Remember, I am a voter now."

A protester stands up and waves her sign that says "What chance do we have against a tie and a coat of arms?" During today's London protest

A protester stands up and waves her sign that says "What chance do we have against a tie and a coat of arms?" During today's London protest

A group of women watch during the big protest today. One is holding a sign that says, "Give me what I deserve."

A group of women watch during the big protest today. One is holding a sign that says, "Give me what I deserve."

Many of the protesters broke social distancing rules during the demonstration in London today but wore face coverings throughout

Many of the protesters broke social distancing rules during the demonstration in London today but wore face coverings throughout

High school seniors are furious about the results they received on Thursday. Sit down and protest amid the furious backlash in today's government in Westminster

High school seniors are furious about the results they received on Thursday. Sit down and protest amid the furious backlash in today's government in Westminster

The GCSE scores are decided using the SAME algorithm behind the A-Level fiasco, which raises fears of collapsing another exam grade

Millions of GCSEs have been calculated using the same controversial algorithm that was used to predict A-Level outcomes.

Up to 97 percent or 4.6 million grades are processed by the Ofqual system, which downgraded 40 percent of A-level grades on Thursday. Education experts have warned that the same method for GCSEs could lower even more scores.

Only 82 percent of A-level grades were calculated using the algorithm, but the government was still met with a violent backlash from devastated students.

Education Policy Institute ThinTank Executive Director Natalie Perera told the observer: "We will almost certainly see a repeat of the many problems encountered with degrees, only GCSEs could they be more severe."

She added, “A larger year group, coupled with the fact that GCSE grades are often harder to predict, means Ofqual could give the standardization model even more prominence. There is a real risk that this will lower even more grades. & # 39;

An Education Department spokesperson said, “Ofqual has a solid model in place to ensure that results are fair for students this year, even though they were unable to take exams this year. Standardization ensures that grades are fair for students, and without them we would see results that are vastly inflated and significantly detract from their worth. & # 39;

Ministers have been charged with making a "backdoor sturgeon" by allowing students to challenge the results based on grades predicted by their teachers.

Last night's Office of Qualifications and Examinations ordinance revealed a major turnaround after an angry student backlash when grades were downgraded.

Students can now dispute their A-Level and GCSE grades for free with grades predicted by their teachers, but not with their mock exam results.

It mirrors the move of Scotland's first minister Nicola Sturgeon last week when she withdrew downgraded scores and allowed students to use their predicted grades.

But Ofqual suspended its criteria last night for students who want to challenge their results with their ridicules hours after saying they might be able to.

Former chief auditor Dr. Tony Breslin told the Telegraph, “To be clear, they found that the suggestion to use ridicule to appeal was so ill-conceived that if something is to be used from the center, it certainly is is smarter to use a center graded grade, achieved after an incredibly rigorous process that Ofqual set the rules for.

& # 39; They never set the rules for ridicule. They just don't know what to buy. What this announcement confirms is that Ofqual believes that the grades graded by the center that they didn't want to go on are actually more reliable than the mock exams they are tasked with. & # 39;

He added, "It's starting to look like they're making a sturgeon on the back door."

The grades predicted by the teacher are considered a better indicator of a student's level than their mock exam scores, according to the Ofqual document.

Mocks don't always cover the entire curriculum and often test a student's knowledge in selected areas. Examination board said if bogus scores are higher than teachers' predicted grades, then the latter should be used.

An Ofqual spokesman said: "The existing arrangements are as fair as possible without audits. However, any process for calculating the grades inevitably leads to results that must be queried. & # 39;

The students demonstrate outside the Department of Education building in Westminster in central London today on the third day

The students demonstrate outside the Department of Education building in Westminster in central London today on the third day

A woman carries a sign that reads "Classicism at Its Best" as she joined hundreds of others in Westminster in protest today

A woman carries a sign that reads "Classicism at Its Best" as she joined hundreds of others in Westminster in protest today

The hundreds of students gathered today during the grand demonstration, the third to rock central London since notes were released Thursday

The hundreds of students gathered today during the grand demonstration, the third to rock central London since notes were released Thursday

Young protesters sit outside the Department of Education building in central London to take part in today's demonstration

Young protesters sit outside the Department of Education building in central London to take part in today's demonstration

Two people watch the crowd of angry students stand outside Downing Street in central London during today's protest

Two people watch the crowd of angry students stand outside Downing Street in central London during today's protest

People hold up signs reading "Our government has failed us" as they march through central London on the third day of protest today

People hold up signs saying "Our government has failed us" as they march through central London on the third day of protest today

Ministers have been accused of making a "backdoor sturgeon" by allowing students to challenge results based on grades predicted by their teachers. Pictured: Scotland's First Minister

Ministers have been accused of making a "backdoor sturgeon" by allowing students to challenge results based on grades predicted by their teachers. Pictured: Scotland's First Minister

Education Secretary Gavin Williamson pictured has been asked to resign over the results fiasco

Education Secretary Gavin Williamson pictured has been asked to resign over the results fiasco

A-level appointment questions answered based on the initial Ofqual criteria

Who can appeal?

  • The government has confirmed that GCSE, AS, and A-level students, as well as those earning advanced project qualifications and the Advanced Extension Award in math, can file complaints with bogus results.
  • According to Ofqual, this appointment path is open to every student with a higher bogus grade than the calculated one.

When can you appeal?

  • Examination boards have confirmed they will be ready to deal with these complaints as of Monday and students are encouraged to contact their school or college.

What work can be used?

  • In the details released by Ofqual on Saturday, the regulator said that previous assessments from the relevant audit committee can be used, such as previous work.
  • Mock exams or teacher-created assessments can also be used provided they are similar in style and content to previous exams.
  • Marked coursework can also be used if students did not take a mock written exam before completing their school or college, but must have completed it under the conditions set by the relevant examination board.
  • It can also be used in addition to bogus exam results.

What conditions are required?

  • Mock exams used for an appeal must have been supervised, not seen before, and taken under conditions that ensure the work belongs to the student.
  • This includes supervision as no corrections or revisions are possible and students do not have access to study materials that are prohibited in exams.
  • The taunts must also have been performed under timed conditions corresponding to the time indicated in normal exams, with adjustments being allowed for students eligible for additional time.
  • It must be completed as part of the study program and by March 20, when most schools and colleges were closed.

What does the bogus assessment have to cover?

  • Mock exams used for the appeal must have "substantial coverage" of the normally graded curriculum, corresponding to an examination paper or non-graded assignment.

What about the centre's grades?

  • Schools and colleges were asked to submit the grades they believed each student would have received if they had passed the papers along with a ranking of students.
  • Ofqual said Saturday that the centre's assessment grades took into account the student's performance throughout the course, while mock assessments typically don't cover the full scope of content.
  • That is, if a student's mock score is higher than the centre's assessment grade, they will get the lower grade.
  • The regulator added that no grades will fall due to an appeal.

What about marking?

  • The mockery must have been provided with an assessment scheme provided by the relevant examination board or an assessment scheme that corresponds to the assessment scheme of the examination board.
  • The grade given by the mock must correspond to the standard of the respective examination board.
  • This may include using the grade limits from the examination board if an earlier thesis was used.

What do schools have to do?

  • If necessary, schools and universities must be able to provide evidence for the entire subject cohort.
  • Ofqual said this included providing evidence of the grades given, the evidence labeling being done on time, and the examination paper and grading scheme used.
  • The student's written work need not have been retained.
  • The government has previously confirmed that schools in England can appeal A-Level and GCSE grades free of charge.
  • State-funded schools and universities can also reclaim the cost of unsuccessful appeals and fees for fall exams, according to the Ministry of Education.

He said that mocks “don't usually cover all of the content,” adding, “The centre's assessment grades took into account student performance throughout the course.

"In cases where the grade for assessing the center was lower than the sham grade, the student receives the grade for assessing the center."

Ofqual dramatically suspended its criteria for students hoping to challenge their A-level grades based on their results in mock exams last night.

In a brief statement, Ofqual said the policy would be "reviewed" by its board of directors and that further information would be released "in due course".

No reason for the decision was immediately available, which created confusion among parents across the country and called for Education Secretary Gavin Williamson to step down.

The move came just hours after the panel published its criteria for bogus test results, which should be used as a basis for an appeal.

It threatened to plunge the A-Level process into further disarray after an outcry from students after nearly 40 percent of the predicted grades were downgraded by the regulator's moderation algorithm.

In a statement late Saturday, an Ofqual spokesman said, "We released information today about bogus appeals results.

"This policy will be reviewed by the Ofqual Board and further information will be released in due course."

Ofqual yesterday announced details of how students with grades from mock tests can appeal their A-Level scores.

The Examination Inspectorate said it would allow the use of exam grades without an exam to ensure that facility is available to a wide range of students, including those who had not taken a mock written exam before schools and colleges closed.

It was also confirmed that an appeal would not lower grades, but the original criteria have now been suspended.

It has been criticized that the suspension of their recent policies creates more confusion in the wake of the chaos.

The chairman of the Commons Education Committee said it was "unacceptable" how Ofqual issued the guidelines only to withdraw them.

Rep. Robert Halfon told BBC News: “This is a big mess. Gosh knows what's going on at Ofqual. It's the last thing we need at this point. I think that is simply unacceptable.

“Students and teachers are incredibly concerned – especially those students who are concerned about their future. That needs to be clarified.

& # 39; Ofqual shouldn't put things on websites, take them away, create confusion. That is just not turned on and needs to be changed. & # 39;

This year's exams have been canceled across the UK due to the coronavirus lockdown and there are fears that the surrogate rating system has created a zip code lottery.

A record 29.9 percent of students achieved an A or A * grade, which is less than the 40.4 percent rated as top marks by teachers.

The Joint Qualifications Council said grades submitted by schools and colleges were "optimistic and would have achieved atypically high scores without standardization".

Labor MP Yvette Cooper said: “Even more incredible chaos and incompetence. The future of young people is being messed up and the government seems to have no idea what it is doing. & # 39;

Shadowing secretary Kate Green said, "Gavin Williamson has promised to give students a triple ban, but instead he has devastated many with unfair exam scores and now his commitment to giving them one more chance is rapidly dissolving on.

“After promising that students could use a valid bogus score, the reality is that many do not get those marks, even if they represent a student's best score.

"The recent chaos is the inevitable consequence of this government's shambolic approach to exams, where solutions are thought up on the back of a pack of cigarettes and announced barely a day before young people received the results."

The regulator said bogus grades would be valid if they came from appropriately supervised assessments that had "no room for correction" provided the assessment was prepared by an appropriate board of examiners or developed by a teacher based on a previous exam.

The data showed that poorer students in England were more likely to be downgraded by the algorithm

The data showed that poorer students in England were more likely to be downgraded by the algorithm

The bogus grades must also have been assessed according to the regular standards of an examination board, and assessments must be completed and graded by March 20, 2020.

Ofqual had previously confirmed that mock-result appointments could begin Monday and would apply for GCSE, AS, and A-level students, as well as those receiving Extended Project Qualifications and Advanced Extension Awards in math.

The setback comes as ministers prepare for a fresh backlash when GCSE results for England are released on Thursday.

The ARMY is now under fire for the exam chaos after typographical errors resulted in more than 100 junior soldiers getting the wrong results in their promotion tests

If there was one unit of the British Army that you could reasonably expect to properly organize the tests, it would be the Royal Logistic Corps.

But the bosses stayed red in the face after typographical errors resulted in more than 100 junior soldiers getting the wrong results in their promotion tests.

Schlimmer noch, der Fehler – was bedeutete, dass Soldaten erfahren hatten, dass sie gescheitert waren, als sie bestanden hatten und umgekehrt – wurde erst entdeckt, nachdem das Promotion Board des RLC die Ergebnisse online gestellt und seinen Erfolg auf militärischen Social-Media-Plattformen gefeiert hatte.

Nach Angaben der Armee trat der Fehler auf, als die Prüfungsskripte der Kandidaten verwechselt und die Testergebnisse den falschen Soldaten zugewiesen wurden.

Mehr als 100 Soldaten des Royal Logistics Corps der britischen Armee erhielten bei ihren Beförderungstests die falschen Ergebnisse. Im Bild: Aktenfoto von Juniorensoldaten, die einen Ausdauertest machen

Mehr als 100 Soldaten des Royal Logistics Corps der britischen Armee erhielten bei ihren Beförderungstests die falschen Ergebnisse. Im Bild: Aktenfoto von Juniorensoldaten, die einen Ausdauertest machen

Zu den Betroffenen gehörten Truppen, die Fahrer von Panzertransportern, Spezialisten für Logistikversorgung und Ausbilder in verschiedenen Spezialisierungen sein wollten.

Letzte Nacht sagte einer: „Ich bin enttäuscht und wütend, nachdem ich hart gelernt habe. Ich war zuversichtlich, dass ich bestanden hatte, und war schockiert, etwas anderes zu sagen. Jetzt sagen sie, dass meine Punktzahl – und viele andere – nicht bestätigt werden kann. Ich hoffe, die Nachzählung ist korrekt und ich muss nicht zurücktreten. & # 39;

Die Kommandanten hoffen, die Ergebnisse nachzählen zu können, um zu vermeiden, dass die Kandidaten die Prüfungen wiederholen müssen. Truppen, die die Beförderung verpassen, werden jedoch zumindest vorübergehend finanziell getroffen, da der Aufstieg von Lanzenkorporal zu Korporal 2.500 GBP an zusätzlichem Gehalt hinzufügt.

Die Nachricht vom Fiasko kam in einer Nachricht eines leitenden Angestellten, der schrieb: „Bedauerlicherweise enthielten die Ergebnisse des RLC-Vorstands … Fehler.

Dies wird dazu führen, dass Soldaten, die über ihre Auswahl informiert wurden, jetzt darüber informiert werden, dass sie nicht erfolgreich waren. Umgekehrt werden einige, die informiert wurden, dass sie nicht erfolgreich waren, erfolgreich gewesen sein. & # 39;

Das Verteidigungsministerium sagte: "Es werden Lehren gezogen, um sicherzustellen, dass es nicht wieder vorkommt."

Wie die Ergebnisse auf A-Level basieren sie zunächst auf Einschätzungen der Lehrer und werden dann vom Ofqual-Algorithmus „moderiert“, um sie mit den Vorjahren in Einklang zu bringen.

According to the Observer, more than 4.6 million GCSEs in England – about 97 percent – are assigned solely on the basis of the controversial algorithm developed by Ofqual.

It has been reported that within days, the government will face a legal challenge due to the chaos of the results.

Mr Williamson said the process was necessary to prevent an "inflation rate" that would render the results worthless after the actual exams were canceled due to the coronavirus outbreak.

The education minister was urged to resign by students, teachers and fellow politicians, including incumbent Liberal Democratic leader Ed Davey.

Labour hat sich auch den Aufforderungen zum Rücktritt von Williamson angeschlossen, als der Abgeordnete Rupa Huq sagte: „Er ist überfordert und sollte aufhören. Zumindest hat er eine alternative Karriere als Frank Spencer-Imitator vor sich. & # 39;

Kritiker haben sich darüber beschwert, dass der Algorithmus zu Tausenden von individuellen Ungerechtigkeiten geführt und Schüler von Schulen, die benachteiligten Gemeinden dienen, überproportional bestraft hat.

Bildungsgewerkschaften verurteilten die Regierung wegen der "politischen Punch and Judy Show" wegen des Umgangs mit dem Abitur.

Der Generalsekretär der Vereinigung der Schul- und Hochschulleiter, Geoff Barton, kritisierte den Prozess und bezeichnete ihn als "surreal und bürokratisch".

He said, “This is clearly a face rescue exercise from a government that has stated that whatever may come, it will not reverse its promise that moderated grades will pass.

Instead, an attempt is being made to resolve the grading fiasco through an appeal process so surreal and bureaucratic that it would be better at this point to do this about-face and allow the original teacher-graded grades to replace moderated grades when they are higher.

“That would be a better approach than this appeal system as it would mean that students would immediately receive revised A-Level grades based on previous teacher assessments, which are based on evidence now being proposed as part of the appeal process would. & # 39;

He added, “We do not blame Ofqual for the bizarre nature of the appointment criteria. The regulator received a hospital card from a disordered government.

"It is time for ministers to stop the chaos and use teacher-graded grades instead of prolonging this nightmare."

Der Generalsekretär der NAHT Head Teachers 'Union, Paul Whiteman, verurteilte die Art und Weise, wie die neuesten Ofqual-Leitlinien für Berufungen auf A-Level in England plötzlich zurückgezogen wurden.

Er sagte: "Es ist ziemlich klar, dass die Regeln auf dem Huf geschrieben und neu geschrieben werden, und die Menschen, die leiden, sind die Tausenden junger Menschen, die gesehen haben, wie ihre zukünftigen Möglichkeiten sich verengen und ohne eigenes Verschulden verschwinden."

Er forderte die Regierung und Ofqual automatisch auf, die 25.000 Ergebnisse zu überprüfen, die zwei oder mehr Noten unter den Vorhersagen ihrer Lehrer lagen.

Er fuhr fort: „Dies würde die schlimmste Ungerechtigkeit sofort beseitigen und den enormen Druck verringern, der auf Schulen und Hochschulen ausgeübt würde, um das Berufungssystem zu nutzen, um dies zu tun.

„Dies scheint ein vernünftiger Ansatz zu sein, bei dem das Berufungssystem offen bleibt, um weniger Ungerechtigkeiten schneller zu bewältigen. Die einzige andere Möglichkeit, die der Regierung zur Verfügung steht, um mit der Situation umzugehen, besteht darin, sich ausschließlich auf die vom Studentenzentrum bewerteten Noten zu verlassen. "

Hillary Gyebi-Ababio, Vizepräsidentin für Hochschulbildung bei der National Union of Students (NUS), sagte, dass die Mitglieder eine Überarbeitung des Bewertungssystems und barrierefreie Beschwerden beantragen.

Sie fügte hinzu: „Die Entscheidung, die offiziellen Leitlinien zurückzuziehen, dient nur dazu, die Verletzung zu komplizieren und weiter zu beleidigen.

"Wir fordern die Regierung nachdrücklich auf, die Schüler mit einer klaren Richtung und einem Plan zur Neugestaltung des gesamten Moderationssystems für Schüler in dieser herausfordernden Zeit zu verstärken und zu unterstützen."

Die Nachricht kommt, als die walisische Regierung auch bestätigte, dass Schüler in Wales gegen ihre A-Level-Noten Berufung einlegen können, wenn sie unter den Vorhersagen ihrer Lehrer liegen.

In Wales gab es einen Aufschrei, nachdem 42 Prozent aller A-Level-Noten während des Moderationsprozesses gesenkt wurden.

Education Secretary Kirsty Williams had said appeals would be acceptable if students should have received "higher evidence" higher grades.

Der Gewerkschaftsführer Sir Keir Starmer riskiert den Zorn der Gewerkschaften, nachdem er gesagt hat, er erwarte, dass alle Schüler nächsten Monat wieder in den Klassenzimmern sind

Sir Keir Starmer versucht heute, den Druck auf Boris Johnson über die Turbulenzen in den Schulen zu erhöhen, indem er zum ersten Mal sagt, dass er erwartet, dass alle Schüler nächsten Monat wieder in den Klassenzimmern sind – trotz des Widerstands der Gewerkschaften, die sich für die Arbeit einsetzen.

Der Labour-Chef antwortet auf die Erklärung von Herrn Johnson in der Mail von letzter Woche am Sonntag, dass es eine „moralische Pflicht“ für Kinder sei, zur Vollzeitschule zurückzukehren, und argumentiert, dass der Premierminister eine „moralische Verantwortung“ habe, um sicherzustellen, dass dies geschieht.

Sir Keir also takes aim at the A-level chaos engulfing the Government, saying that the 'anger and frustration I have heard from families over recent days about the exams fiasco has been profound'.

Sir Keir Starmer is pictured talking to students at Queen Elizabeth Sixth Form College, Darlington, after they received their A-Level results

Sir Keir Starmer is pictured talking to students at Queen Elizabeth Sixth Form College, Darlington, after they received their A-Level results

It comes after nearly 40 per cent of A-level grades awarded on Thursday were lower than teachers' predictions, prompting anger among the 280,000 students affected.

Ministers and regulators now face the looming prospect of a damaging court battle over the algorithm used to decide A-level results.

Legal efforts are being spearheaded by Foxglove, a non-profit organisation which campaigns against the misuse of digital technology.

Before the results were released on Thursday, Ms. Williams announced that the final grades would be no lower than the students' previous AS scores.

"Earlier this week, I directed Qualifications Wales to expand the rationale for referring to High School, AS, Skills Challenge Certificate and GCSEs," she said.

“Today they confirmed what this means for students. I accept that learners wanted and needed more clarity, and I believe this achieves that.

& # 39; Qualification Wales and the WJEC will share the full details but an appeal is now open if there is evidence of internal assessments rated by the school or college as higher than the grade it received.

"There is a guarantee that no one will get a lower grade after being called and that all appointments are free."

Regulator Qualifications Wales said schools would be able to appeal to exam board WJEC if they: they used the wrong data when calculating a grade, the calculated grades generated by the statistical standardisation model were incorrectly allocated or communicated, there was some other procedural failing on the part of WJEC, there is evidence of internal assessment that has been judged by the school or college to be at a higher grade than the calculated grade awarded.

The regulator said no grades would be lowered as a result of an appeal and would either go up or stay the same.

The moderation system monitored by Qualifications Wales and WJEC has been criticized by students, teachers, trade unions and opposition politicians.

Adam Price, director of Plaid Cymru, said, “Students who received lower grades than teacher ratings in A-Level and AS exams should be upgraded to teacher evaluation grades.

"If this approach is advocated by the British Labor leader in England, why is the Labor First Minister in Wales so adamantly against it?"

"In addition, this should be used as a mechanism for awarding GCSE scores and this should be communicated to learners today for reassurance."

Senedd's Children, Youth and Education Committee is dismissed on Tuesday and has asked the Welsh Government, Qualification Wales and WJEC to provide information and answer questions.

Committee Chair, Lynne Neagle, said: "Given the significant concerns and complexities in delivering audit results this year, we will meet urgently to provide clarity for those who have gone through this challenging process in unprecedented times."

Furious students and parents are looking to settle the A-level exam chaos in court as they slammed the 'ridiculous and insane' Ofqual algorithm used to dish out grades.

Among those taking legal action are Hamza Nur, whose son dropped marks, six pupils supported by the Good Law Project, Curtis Parfitt-Ford, whose petition has over 220,000 signatures and Michael Bell, whose daughter Lexi was impacted.

Pupils lost out on places at top universities – such as Russel Group ones and Oxford and Cambridge – due to the system which downgraded 40 per cent of results.

Some saw grades plummet from As and Bs to Ds and Us, which were far lower than their teachers' predicted marks and their mock exams.

A fresh tsunami of fury is expected to hit Ofqual and Education Secretary Gavin Williamson when GCSE grades are published on Thursday.

Among those taking legal action are Michael Bell, whose daughter Lexi (pictured together) was impacted and Hamza Nur, whose son dropped marks

Among those taking legal action are Michael Bell, whose daughter Lexi (pictured together) was impacted and Hamza Nur, whose son dropped marks

Others include six pupils supported by the Good Law Project and Curtis Parfitt-Ford (pictured), whose petition has over 220,000 signatures

Others include six pupils supported by the Good Law Project and Curtis Parfitt-Ford (pictured), whose petition has over 220,000 signatures

A fresh tsunami of fury is expected to hit Ofqual and Education Secretary Gavin Williamson (pictured) when GCSE grades are published on Thursday

A fresh tsunami of fury is expected to hit Ofqual and Education Secretary Gavin Williamson (pictured) when GCSE grades are published on Thursday

Curtis Parfitt-Ford, 18, from Ealing, is also taking to the courts after he created a petition calling for a fairer system, which has been signed by 220,000 people

Curtis Parfitt-Ford, 18, from Ealing, is also taking to the courts after he created a petition calling for a fairer system, which has been signed by 220,000 people

Of the six students going to the courts with backing from the Good Law Project, Lina Assah from Newport Girls' High School in Shropshire is one

Of the six students going to the courts with backing from the Good Law Project, Lina Assah from Newport Girls' High School in Shropshire is one

Business consultant Mr Nur is expected to have his say at a hearing on Tuesday, but it could be delayed. His 18-year-old son Ridwan said he was predicted ABB by his teachers at New City College in Tower Hamlets, London.

But he got a D in business, a U in physics and a U in maths after his grades were processed by Ofqual's algorithm.

He was looking to study civil engineering at City, University of London, which has said it will hold his place until September 5 so he can appeal his grades.

Torment of teenagers left in the balance

Lucy Lipfriend has been in limbo for a second year after missing her place at Cambridge University.

The 19-year-old, who had to achieve A * AA in her Abitur, is studying theology, religion and philosophy of religion at Clare College this summer.

But the teenager from Northwood, northwest London, was downgraded to three Bs by the computer algorithm after exams were canceled.

She believes this was due to her poor performance on the high school graduation exams last year she passed when her mother Tina was diagnosed with breast cancer.

Her grades slipped to a C in philosophy, a B in English literature and an E in maths last summer, despite high teacher predictions. Lucy took a year off planning to retake the exams as a private candidate and won a Cambridge offer. After the exams were canceled, her former teachers at St. Helen & # 39; s, a private day school in Northwood, handed in grades of A * AA.

Three tutors who helped her last year predicted three A * s.

But her grades have been lowered and her university place hangs in the balance – depending on her appeal.

Lucy said, “I worked very hard for a year and through no fault of my own I couldn't get a place at the university I have always dreamed of. Grades should not be determined by a computer.

"I don't think a student's grades can necessarily be based on what they have achieved in the past or what other students who happened to go to their school have achieved in the past."

Lucy says Cambridge encouraged her to appeal, but she must keep her grades by August 31.

Mr Nur, 45, from Wanstead, east London, told the Sunday Times: 'This is not just for my son – this is for all the students.

'We want them to review the whole process, quash the results and come up with a fairer system of assessing students.'

He added: 'They have taken a dream away from kids from deprived places who were aspiring to do something with their lives.'

Of the six students going to the courts with backing from the Good Law Project, Lina Assah is one.

The 18-year-old, who attended Newport Girls' High School in Shropshire, one of the best girls' grammar schools in the country, missed out on a place at LSE.

She wanted to read maths and economics after being predicted two A*s and two As, but was awarded one A, two Bs and a C.

Another of the students, whose name was given as Michael, saw his grades fall from a predicted BBB to EEE, which left him 'disheartened'.

He said: 'Teachers are entrusted with the task of predicting students' grades and considering they are in a far better position to determine what level students are working at, it is abysmal to think that the Government, whose job it is to lead this country in the right direction, has allowed an algorithm to determine the futures of thousands of students.

'This injustice cannot and should not stand, and we are urging the Government to rethink this decision.'

The Good Law Project's crowdfunding bid to cover legal costs has reached more than £41,000.

Director of the Good Law Project Jolyon Maugham said: 'If you don't go to a successful school you don't deserve to succeed either – strip away all the science and that's what's delivered by the system Ofqual and Gavin Williamson have put in place.

'It's not fair, it's not good enough, and hard-working students should not have to stand for it.'

Ms Assah, Michael and the four others sent a letter to Ofqual questioning the fairness of the system, brought about due to a lack of exams during the pandemic.

The group have asked for a reply from the regulator within a week as legal proceedings will begin after.

Curtis Parfitt-Ford, 18, from Ealing, is also taking to the courts after he created a petition calling for a fairer system, which has been signed by 220,000 people.

Meanwhile Michael Bell is crowdfunding for an appeal on behalf of his daughter Lexi, who was downgraded from two A*s and an A to an A and two Bs.

One A-level student who missed out on a top veterinary school place after being handed three D grades yesterday accused Schools Minister Nick Gibb on national radio of 'ruining my life'.

Nina Bunting-Mitcham said she was predicted to achieve ABB and scored As and Bs in her mock exams, but her DDD results meant she failed to meet her offer from the Royal Veterinary College.

Speaking on BBC Radio 4's Any Questions, Mr Gibb promised a 'robust' and 'swift' appeal system which should see challenged grades addressed by September 7, telling her: 'It won't ruin your life, it will be sorted I can assure you.'

Nina Bunting-Mitcham said she was predicted to achieve ABB and scored As and Bs in her mock exams, but her DDD results meant she failed to meet her offer from the Royal Veterinary College

Nina Bunting-Mitcham said she was predicted to achieve ABB and scored As and Bs in her mock exams, but her DDD results meant she failed to meet her offer from the Royal Veterinary College

Nick Gibb, pictured, was challenged on Radio 4's Any Questions by A-level student Nina Bunting-Mitchem over exam results being downgraded

Nick Gibb, pictured, was challenged on Radio 4's Any Questions by A-level student Nina Bunting-Mitchem over exam results being downgraded

Mr Gibb added pupils can also sit exams in the autumn and 'many universities are holding places open to start in January'.

He said it was 'rare' for students to be downgraded three grades from their predicted ones, adding: 'This should not have happened to you. We don't want you to have to go through this. There will be these mistakes.'

Ms Bunting-Mitcham, 22, from Peterborough, told The Mail on Sunday she had been planning a career in music when she took a sudden decision to follow her childhood dream of being a vet.

She left the private school where she had begun A-levels in music, drama and philosophy, and using a private tutor, re-sat her GCSEs in the sciences, gaining A and A* grades. Then she enrolled at Stamford College in Peterborough to study A-Levels in Biology, Chemistry and Psychology.

'All the way through, I've scored between A* and B in my tests and mocks,' she said. 'I was predicted ABB and got an offer from the best vet school in the world. Then I received results telling me I had three Ds. After all that hard work, it was just as if the world had collapsed around me and my life was ruined. It's the worst thing that's ever happened to me.

'I cannot make any sense of the decision. I've never been a D-grade student. I rang the university, which said if you don't get the appeal in time we'll keep your place for 2021. I'm determined that whatever it takes, I will become a vet.'

Stamford College said 'Nina is a very bright student', who 'would be a credit to any university', adding she was an example of 'where the system has failed'.

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