TOP TRENDING

Britannia rules the waves of the air! | Daily mail online


Land of Hope and Glory and Dominion Britannia! were sung by a choir at Last Night of the Proms tonight after the lyrics were furiously beaten back for "colonial ties".

The BBC previously said the controversial plays would be performed without text at the Royal Albert Hall in London but made a dramatic U-turn after heated debate over the decision.

A reduced orchestra of 65 instead of the usual 300 performed live at the venue – but without an audience due to coronavirus restrictions – with singers placed in the booths to ensure social distance.

The eagerly awaited concert was performed by the South African soprano Golda Schultz with the BBC Symphony Orchestra under their principal guest conductor Dalia Stasevska.

Violinist Nicola Benedetti performed at Vaughan Williams' The Lark Ascending after Lisa Batiashvili dropped out due to illness.

Land of Hope and Glory and Dominion Britannia! were sung by a choir at Last Night of the Proms tonight after the lyrics were furiously beaten back for "colonial ties".

The BBC made a dramatic U-turn to allow traditional British anthems to be performed at the Royal Albert Hall in London despite weeks of controversy over their inclusion

The BBC made a dramatic U-turn to allow traditional British anthems to be performed at the Royal Albert Hall in London despite weeks of controversy over their inclusion

Presenter Katie Derham introduced the show and said: "Our orchestra, singers and some very special guests are ready for an evening of classic treats, show songs and all your traditional favorites."

The show was shown to a socially distant audience of hundreds in the grounds of the Royal Hospital Chelsea.

The original plan would have performed the traditional plays, viewed by some as controversial due to their perceived ties to imperialism, without lyrics.

However, it was decided to include lyrics performed by a "select group of BBC singers" after MailOnline requested the songs to be recorded.

Musicians performed live at the venue, but without a live audience due to restrictions due to the coronavirus pandemic

Musicians performed live at the venue, but without a live audience due to restrictions due to the coronavirus pandemic

A reduced orchestra of 65 instead of the usual 300 performed live at the venue - but without an audience due to coronavirus restrictions - with singers placed in the booths to ensure social distance. Pictured: The Royal Albert Hall this evening

A reduced orchestra of 65 instead of the usual 300 performed live at the venue – but without an audience due to coronavirus restrictions – with singers placed in the stands to ensure social distance. Pictured: The Royal Albert Hall this evening

Some of the lyrics that are considered controversial in the songs include the rule, Britannia! Lines: "British will never, never, never be slaves" and: "The nations that are not so blessed as you / must in turn fall to the tyrants / while you are to flourish large and freely: The fear and envy of them all. & # 39;

Ms. Stasevska, the conductor, said amid the controversy that she played no role in the decision to remove the lyrics.

The BBC Proms later said that both pieces will now feature a select group of BBC singers. This means that the words are sung in the hall and, as we have always made clear, the audience can sing along at home.

"Although it can't be a full choir and we can't have an audience in the hall, we do everything we can to make it special and want one last night to be really remembered," the broadcaster added.

& # 39; We hope everyone will appreciate this solution. We believe that the night itself will be a very special moment for the country – and one that is urgently needed for everyone after a difficult time. & # 39;

The BBC's initial decision to play instrumental versions of the anthems prompted Prime Minister Boris Johnson to weigh the debate and insist, "It's time we stop being ashamed of our history".

“I can't believe … the BBC is saying they won't sing the words of Land of Hope and Glory or the Rule of Britannia! as is traditionally the case at the end of last night's Proms, ”he added.

"I think it is time we stopped being ashamed of our history, our traditions and our culture, and that we stopped this general fit of self-blame and wetness."

Culture Secretary Oliver Dowden said: "Confident forward-looking nations do not erase their history, they complement it."

After the U-turn, Downing Street told the BBC that the Prime Minister "welcomed the decision" to include lyrics during the last night performances of the two anthems.

Mr. Johnson later added, “I believe this country is experiencing an orgy of national embarrassment over some of the things that other people around the world love most about us.

“People love our traditions and our history with all its imperfections. It's crazy for us to go around trying to censor it. It is absolutely absurd and I think we should speak loudly and proudly for Britain and our history. & # 39;

BBC insiders had also criticized the company's initial decision to only record instrumental versions of Land of Hope and Glory and Rule Britannia after the angry clash of racism.

A source told The Timesthe BBC's handling of the program sometimes felt like "white men in a panic" trying to appease the Black Lives Matter movement because the songs had obvious links to colonialism and slavery.

Pictured: Pro-EU and Brexiteers clash in front of the Royal Albert Hall as the last night of the Proms begins tonight

Pictured: Pro-EU and Brexiteers clash outside the Royal Albert Hall as the last night of the Proms begins tonight

Pictured: Police are seen near the Royal Albert Hall as protesters and counter-protesters wave EU and UK flags in the debate

Pictured: Police are seen near the Royal Albert Hall as protesters and counter-protesters wave EU and UK flags in the debate

The original plan would have performed the traditional plays, viewed by some as controversial due to their perceived ties to imperialism, without lyrics. Pictured: Pro-EU supporters outside the Royal Albert Hall this evening

The original plan would have performed the traditional plays, viewed by some as controversial due to their perceived ties to imperialism, without lyrics. Pictured: Pro-EU supporters outside the Royal Albert Hall this evening

Conservative MP Michael Fabricant added: “I find all of this very sad, there are some fine words in Rule Britannia, it is not just about Britain not being slaves. You have "other nations that are not as blessed as you need to be for tyrants to fall while you are to prosper great and freely". Isn't that nice?

& # 39; It was written in 1740. What happened next? There was the War of Austrian Succession that Britain was a part of, but it was also a time when the British allowed Jews and Huguenots overseas citizenship, making Britain a great liberal trading nation.

& # 39; The national anthem is sung and Jerusalem is sung, so it seems like they are trying to pick just these two songs. Self-confident, future-oriented nations do not erase their history, but complement it.

What is the story of Rule, Britannia, and Land of Hope and Glory?

As a rule, Britannia comes from the poem of the same name by the Scottish poet and playwright James Thomson and was set to music by the English composer Thomas Arne in 1740.

It gained popularity in the UK after it was first played in London in 1745 and became the symbol of the British Empire, most closely linked to the British Navy.

The song was used as part of a number of compositions including Wagner's 1837 Concerto Overture in D major and Beethoven's orchestral work Wellington & # 39; s Victory.

The song has been an integral part of the annual Remembrance Day celebration since 1930 when it was the first song played on The Traditional Music program.

It became popular again at the end of World War II in 1945 after it was played at the ceremonial surrender of the Japanese Imperial Army in Singapore.

As a rule, Britannia is usually played annually during the BBC Last Night of the Proms.

But its inclusion has sparked controversy in recent years as it was viewed as too patriotic.

The song & # 39; Land of Hope and Glory & # 39; based on the trio theme from Elgar's Pomp And Circumstance March No. 1, which originally premiered in 1901.

It caught the attention of King Edward VII after being the only piece in the history of the Proms to receive a double encore.

King Edward suggested that this trio would make a good song, and so Elgar worked it into the final section of his Coronation Ode to be performed at King Edward's Coronation.

"And Britain's history isn't all bad. We abolished slavery in 1807, more than 50 years before America got there. We could be proud of that." I can live with it [songs sung by a person].

“When you hear some of these opera singers getting it out, I don't think you would say it's a thin voice. Let's just have one voice sing these songs out loud, why not? It's a tradition and a beautiful melody. & # 39;

Land of Hope and Glory and Rule Britannia are traditionally performed on the last night of the Proms, when thousands of flag throwers normally fill the Royal Albert Hall.

However, critics argue that the lyrics to Rule Britannia, including the line "Britons will never, never, never be slaves" are overtly racist given Britain's prominent role in the slave trade – and the implication that some people could be slaves.

The 1902 lyrics of Land of Hope and Glory were supposedly inspired by Cecil Rhodes, an imperialist and mining magnate whose statue is being removed from an Oxford college after protests.

Rule Britannia, a poem by the Scottish playwright James Thomson, was set to music by the English composer Thomas Arne in 1740. Land of Hope and Glory was composed by Edward Elgar and Arthur Benson added the lyrics later in the 20th century.

Politicians and activists expressed their anger over efforts to drop the songs in the debate earlier this year.

International Trade Minister Ranil Jayawardena, MP for Northeast Hampshire, shared an article on the dispute with followers on Twitter.

He wrote, "What a lot … [sic] This is a chance for BBC bosses to prove that they have ventured outside the M25 and understand the British people, rather than just campaign groups and lobbyists in London."

Conservative MP Paul Bristow tweeted, “Is it time to get the BBC out of its royalty plight? It must be painful when they are funded by millions of people with whom they no longer have anything in common? & # 39;

And the Brexit activist Nigel Farage tweeted: “So the BBC could remove Rule Britannia and Land of Hope and Glory from The Proms because the Finnish conductor is too awake. Why not drop it instead? & # 39;

Headmistress Katharine Birbalsingh, whose father was Indian Guyanese and whose mother was Jamaican, said she "waved flags and sang Rule Britannia" with black friends at the Royal Albert Hall last year.

She said, “The whites in the audience didn't tell us to stop, that the song wasn't ours, that we were too black to sing it. So what's the problem? & # 39;

Susan Hall, Conservative Chairwoman for the Greater London Authority, said, “Rule Britannia and Land of Hope and Glory are favorites for millions of us.

"Why should so many of us have broken traditions because they are not considered PC ridiculous?"

Proms host Josie d & # 39; Arby, who is black, said this year's Proms program reflected "respect for the current climate."

She said last night should be inclusive but keep the tradition, adding, "Part of inclusivity involves engaging your traditional audience and die-hard fans."

Organizers had to change the entire Proms season due to coronavirus restrictions that limit the number of singers and musicians who can perform together.

Rule, Britannia! text

Rule, Britannia! Britannia, rule the waves!

British will never, never, never be slaves.

As Britain first by command of Heaven

Originated from the azure main line,

This was the charter of the land

And guardian angels sang this sort:

The nations are not as blessed as you are

Tyrants must fall again

While you are to flourish big and free:

The fear and envy of everyone.

You should rise even more majestically,

More terrible of every stranger's stroke,

Like the loud explosion that tears the sky apart

Only serves to root your native oak.

You haughty tyrants will never tame;

All of their attempts to bend you down

Just wanna awaken your generous flame

But work their suffering and your reputation.

You own the country rulership;

Your cities will shine with commerce;

All yours should be the main theme

And each bank circles it, yours.

The muses, still found with freedom,

Shall mend to your happy shores.

Blest island! crowned with incomparable beauty,

And male hearts to watch over the mass.

Rule, Britannia! Britannia, rule the waves!

British will never, never, never be slaves

Land of hope and glory lyrics

Land of hope and glory

Mother of the free

How shall we praise you?

Who is born of you

Even wider and wider

Do you want to set your limits?

God who made you mighty

Make yourself even more powerful!

Dear land of hope, your hope is crowned

God make you even more powerful!

On Sov & # 39; ran brows, loved, known

Once more your crown is set

Your same laws won through freedom

I have ruled you well and for a long time;

By gaining freedom, by maintaining truth

Your kingdom should be strong

Your fame is as old as the days

As an ocean big and wide:

A pride that dares and does not praise

A strict and silent pride

Not this false joy that dreams contentedly

With what our fathers won;

The blood given out by a hero father

A hero’s son is still annoying