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Bristol University checks logo after the fall of the Colston statue


Bristol University plans to check its logo with Edward Colston after Black Lives Matter protesters toppled the slave dealer statue and threw it into the city's harbor.

Vice-Chancellor and President Professor Hugh Brady said that racism is "still an essential part of everyday life", but that he wants to play an "active" role in eradication.

The coat of arms shows the 17th-century politician who came from the city, and some of the institution's buildings – such as the Wills Memorial Building – are associated with slavery.

Bristol University pictured is considering redesigning its logo to remove all traces of people connected to the slave trade, such as Edward Colston

The 17th century slave trader's statue was thrown into the Bristol docks

The 17th century slave trader's statue was thrown into the Bristol docks

Henry Overton Wills III was the university's first chancellor and poured £ 100,000 – £ 10.5 million today – in the 1870s.

But his family made their fortune from the tobacco industry, which was built on the back of African slaves in the United States.

It comes after Black Lives Matter protesters tore the Colston statue off its pedestal, dragged it through the streets, and threw it into the Avon River on Sunday.

The move has prompted others across the country to demolish around 100 statues related to slavery.

Mr. Brady said: “We will initiate this debate with our staff, students, alumni and larger urban communities.

“We are painfully aware that racism has not happened overnight and will not end there. We see in the long term how we can make real changes at our university.

The coat of arms shows the 17th-century politician who came from the city, and some of the institution's buildings - such as the Wills Memorial Building - have connections to the slave trader

The coat of arms shows the 17th-century politician who came from the city, and some of the institution's buildings – such as the Wills Memorial Building – have connections to the slave trader

"We firmly believe that if we all actively contribute and develop a culture of speech that places all of us – not just colored people – responsible for calling racism when it occurs, we will be successful."

Earlier today, a 125-year-old edition of Tit Bits magazine was found in the Colston statue – signed by the men who dropped it there – after being fished out of the water yesterday.

Museum staff began cleaning up the 17th-century statue of the slave trader after it was recovered from its tomb in Bristol Harbor.

M Shed, the museum where the monument is placed without being cleaned by the graffiti sprayed on by demonstrators, found "two surprising additions".

One was a bicycle tire that showed up with the statue when it was pulled out of the harbor. However, the other point was of historical interest.

In the statue's mantle tails, the team found an edition of the British weekly magazine in 1895, founded by an early father of popular journalism George Newnes.

The tumbled statue of Edward Colston, demolished and thrown into the water by anti-racism protesters, contained a 125-year-old magazine signed by men who first set it up. The magazine is called Tit-Bits - a forerunner of popular journalism in England

The tumbled statue of Edward Colston, demolished and thrown into the water by anti-racism protesters, contained a 125-year-old magazine signed by men who first set it up. The magazine is called Tit-Bits – a forerunner of popular journalism in England

After being fished out of Bristol Harbor, where they were thrown in by demonstrators on Sunday, the museum workers began cleaning up the 17th-century statue of the slave trader

After being fished out of Bristol Harbor, where they were thrown in by demonstrators on Sunday, the museum workers began cleaning up the 17th-century statue of the slave trader

The chiefs of the museum, which will now house the statue, say that the graffiti sprayed on by demonstrators will not be cleaned

The chiefs of the museum, which will now house the statue, say that the graffiti sprayed on by demonstrators will not be cleaned

The restorer of the Edward Colston statue said that it will be preserved as it is - with the rope used to pull it down and the hoop attached to it when it came out of the water

The restorer of the Edward Colston statue said that it will be preserved as it is – with the rope used to pull it down and the hoop attached to it when it came out of the water

Tit-Bits: The magazine from which popular journalism emerged

Tit-Bits was a popular magazine founded by George Newnes in 1881 and containing small and interesting information – or "Tit-Bits" as they were called.

The magazine ran for more than 100 years until it merged with Weekend in 1984 – owned by Associated Newspapers, now owned by DMGT Media, the MailOnline and the Daily Mail. Interestingly, tit-bits primarily paved the way for the Daily Mail.

Alfred Harmsworth who founded the Daily Mail

Alfred Harmsworth who founded the Daily Mail

A contributor named Alfred Harmsworth, who would later become Lord Northcliffe, published a competitive publication on Tit-Bits entitled "Answers to Correspondents on Any Topic Under the Sun".

After being successful in the printing world, he later started the Daily Mail.

Another Tit-Bits employee, Arthur Pearson, who won a job at Tit-Bits in a competition, created the Daily Express.

After cleaning, they discovered on the inside the names of those who originally fit the statue and the date.

The team said on Twitter: “We spent the morning removing mud from the inside with a hose and a pull-out brush.

& # 39; The painted graffiti was particularly at risk from cleaning, so this was done very carefully to ensure that it was not washed off.

“The symbolism of his graffittig body has been preserved, and the meaning he has for us will be an important story.

& # 39; We added two surprises in the end. First a bicycle tire that came out of the harbor with the statue, and then the discovery of a reference to the people who first installed it in Bristol: an 1895 magazine rolled up in the coat tails.

"After careful cleaning and drying, we found that someone had handwritten the names of those who originally matched the statue and the date on the inside."

The statue, which had been in the city center since 1895, was torn down during the protest against Black Lives Matter on Sunday and flung into the River Avon.

When around 10,000 demonstrators gathered in the city, the footage showed demonstrators lifting the memorial with ropes before cheering and dancing around it.

The statue had been a hotly debated subject, and the recent petition to remove it has received more than 11,000 signatures.

Along with the tobacco trade, Colston's wealth contributed to the development of Bristol in the 17th century.

He used much of his wealth from his extensive slave trade to build schools and poorhouses in his hometown.

After the protest, the Mayor of Bristol, Marvin Rees, confirmed that the bust should be fished and displayed on site.

The future of the base on which the statue stood is decided by a democratic consultation, the council says

The future of the base on which the statue stood is decided by a democratic consultation, the council says

The demonstrators tied ropes around the statue of Edward Colston in Bristol city center before tearing it to the ground on Sunday

The demonstrators tied ropes around the statue of Edward Colston in Bristol city center before tearing it to the ground on Sunday

This afternoon crowds crowded side by side in Bristol Harbor to watch the statue being thrown into the water

This afternoon crowds crowded side by side in Bristol Harbor to watch the statue being thrown into the water

The Mayor of Bristol, Marvin Rees, has now confirmed that the bust will be fished and exhibited

The Mayor of Bristol, Marvin Rees, has now confirmed that the bust will be fished and exhibited

It was pulled out of Bristol harbor yesterday. The statue is now placed next to posters from the recent protests to educate them about slavery.

The mayor also announced that historians and local experts are tasked with “looking into the city's past”.

Mr. Rees said: "Bristol's real story is being investigated by a new commission so that the city can better understand its history."