ENTERTAINMENT

Boris slaps the UK into reverse: PM to reach out to the nation TOMORROW


Boris Johnson is set to announce crackdown on normal life today to stop a second wave of coronavirus.

He will stop his "back to work" trip, announce restrictions on socialization and impose a 10pm curfew on bars and restaurants from Thursday.

Pubs and other venues are only allowed to serve seated customers, and drinkers are not allowed to gather in crowds. Chief Medical Officer Chris Whitty said yesterday that breaking "unnecessary household ties" is critical.

Northern Ireland announced a ban on families visiting other households last night and there was speculation that England might follow suit.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock warned Covid that the transmission "typically takes place in social settings, with people coming into your home or you going out and socializing".

The number of guests at weddings can also be reduced from the current limit of 30. A senior government source admitted last night that the prime minister's return to work action would be suspended after scientific advisers warned that transmission in the workplace was an issue.

In July, Mr Johnson urged staff to "get back to work if you can" to prevent city centers from becoming ghost towns.

However, a source told the mail that employees are being advised to work from home if they can in the coming weeks.

The prime minister reportedly should shut down the entire hospitality sector after the health minister and government academics urged more draconian measures before the cabinet economic hawks pulled him off the sidelines, according to The Times.

The restrictions have divided the cabinet, and Chancellor Rishi Sunak and Economy Minister Alok Sharma both warned of the potential economic impact. However, a senior government source insisted that all ministers accept the move was necessary to bring the R-rate back under control, which measures how quickly the disease is spreading.

"The goal is to do maximum damage to the R and minimal damage to the economy," the source said. "If we don't act now, there will be greater economic damage later."

Businesses and schools are allowed to stay open, with government sources insisting the measures do not constitute a second lockdown. In other developments:

  • The Covid-19 alert level has been increased from three to four, which means virus cases are either high or "exponentially".
  • The number of confirmed cases rose by 4,368 from 3,899 the previous day. There were 11 more deaths;
  • More than 430,000 residents in South Wales have been locked down after an increase in local cases.
  • Taxpayers will have to pay billions more to keep trains running after rail company funding was extended by 18 months.
  • The rules for areas in the local lockdown are being relaxed to allow grandparents to look after their grandchildren.
  • In an open letter to the Prime Minister, more than 30 leading doctors and scientists criticized "harmful" plans to impose blanket lockdown measures.

Boris Johnson is set to announce crackdown on normal life today to stop a second wave of coronavirus. He will stop his "back to work" trip, announce restrictions on socialization and impose a 10pm curfew on bars and restaurants from Thursday

Pubs and other venues are restricted to seated customers and drinkers are not allowed to gather in crowds (pictured, people enjoying a drink outside the Red Lion Pub in Westminster, London).

Pubs and other venues are restricted to seated customers and drinkers are not allowed to gather in crowds (pictured, people enjoying a drink outside the Red Lion Pub in Westminster, London).

In July, Mr Johnson urged staff to "get back to work if you can" to prevent city centers from becoming ghost towns. However, a source told the mail that employees will be advised in the coming weeks to "work from home if you can" (pictured, commuters working at Manchester's main tram stop in St. Peter's Square).

In July, Mr Johnson urged staff to "get back to work if you can" to prevent city centers from becoming ghost towns. However, a source told the mail that employees will be advised in the coming weeks to "work from home if you can" (pictured, commuters working at Manchester's main tram stop in St. Peter's Square).

The Prime Minister will urge the public to follow the "six-point rule" and continue basic measures such as hand washing - or risk an even harsher lockdown in the coming weeks (Image: Police are looking for people on Brighton Beach)

The Prime Minister will urge the public to follow the "six-point rule" and continue basic measures such as hand washing – or risk an even harsher lockdown in the coming weeks (Image: Police are looking for people on Brighton Beach)

Official Downing Street slides showed that if the infection rate continued, there could be 50,000 coronavirus cases a day through mid-October, which could result in more than 200 deaths a day by mid-November

Official Downing Street slides showed that if the infection rate continued, there could be 50,000 coronavirus cases a day through mid-October, which could result in more than 200 deaths a day by mid-November

The number of new Covid-19 admitted to hospitals in England has increased since early September

The number of new Covid-19 admitted to hospitals in England has increased since early September

The map to the left shows peaks in falls in the north west of England, but falls are increasing almost all along the line

The map to the left shows peaks in falls in the north west of England, but falls are increasing almost all along the line

Sadiq Khan says he would like face masks to be worn in ALL public spaces in London as part of the 15-point crackdown on Covid – as it turns out that infection rates are higher in 20 counties than areas of England already affected by restrictions

Sadiq Khan said yesterday that he wanted face masks worn in all London public spaces in a 15-point coronavirus crackdown he beat up with council presidents.

The Mayor of London has also urged ministers to impose a 10pm curfew on all pubs and restaurants in the capital to "reduce the number of hours people spend together accidentally passing on the virus".

He blamed young people who had socialized in August of "exponential" increases in coronavirus cases after leading government scientists claimed today that 50,000 daily infections could occur in a month if draconian measures were not taken.

On his Sky News, Mr Khan pointed out further restrictions on people's lives in his 15-point coronavirus plan, including limiting funerals and weddings, as he claimed the rule of six "by itself does not slow the spread of the virus" .

The mayor threatened "additional measures" to suppress the coronavirus when he urged Londoners to avoid public transport and work from home "where possible".

New data shows that coronavirus infection rates are higher in 20 London boroughs than areas of England already affected by restrictions.

Public Health England's most recent watchlist shows that the agency in England with the lowest case rate considered an "area of ​​intervention" – the highest level of concern – is Ribble Valley, with 18.3 cases per 100,000.

But Kensington and Chelsea, Enfield and Southwark, among others, have higher infection rates. Redbridge (34.2), Hounslow (32.5) and Barking and Dagenham (29.3) are the three most affected parts of the capital.

A spokesman # 10 said, “Nobody is underestimating the challenges the new measures will pose for many individuals and companies. We know this will not be easy, but we need to take further action to control recurrence in cases of the virus and protect the NHS. & # 39;

The measures announced today are accompanied by a new push to enforce, including higher fines for individuals and on-site closures for venues that do not comply with the rules.

The final package will be signed by Cabinet this morning and coordinated at a meeting of the Government's Cobra Emergency Committee with senior executives from Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

The Prime Minister will give details of Parliament's restrictions at lunchtime before addressing the nation at 8 p.m. tonight.

He will urge the public to follow the "six-point rule" and continue basic measures such as hand washing – or risk an even harsher lockdown in the coming weeks. Mr Hancock said last night that the UK was at a "tipping point" where failure to follow the rules could cause the virus to spiral out of control.

In a somber briefing on television yesterday, Mr Whitty said the restrictions may have to last six months to help the NHS weather the winter.

Government scientific adviser Sir Patrick Vallance told the briefing without action that Covid cases could reach 50,000 a day by the middle of next month and would die by November 200 a day.

None of the leading scholars asked media questions about their presentation that critics described as misleading. Mr Johnson will also evade media screening when he makes his televised address tonight.

The warning came amid Tory's unease at the prospect of further restrictions and "authoritarianism". Sir Edward Leigh cautioned the government against becoming "increasingly incompetent".

Sir Graham Brady, chairman of the Tory Backbenchers committee in 1922, accused Mr. Johnson of "decreeing" and treating the public "like children". A cabinet minister told the Mail that the prime minister also has serious reservations about imposing new restrictions on an economy struggling to recover from the lockdown.

The source said, "My impression is that the last thing Boris wants to do is get dragged back into another lock, but he has a very hard time resisting the scientists' message."

The Prime Minister is believed to have found it hard to resist the demands of the Minister of Health and government scientists as panic over rising cases of coronavirus in official circles.

According to reports, Mr. Johnson was prevented by Chancellor Sunak and Secretary of Commerce Sharma from shutting down the entire hospitality sector. They feared, according to The Times, that drifting into a second national lockdown would destroy UK plc.

A 10 p.m. curfew is about reducing the “viral load” if it is exposed, says an expert

Although the 10 p.m. government curfew in bars and restaurants appears arbitrary, public health officials claim that most virus transmissions in August were caused by increased socializing – among young people.

Some experts believe that the longer people are gathered in public houses, the more likely they are to give up their vigilance and stop social distancing.

Professor Linda Bauld from the University of Edinburgh told HuffPost UK: “Many countries have taken this approach. The principle is, we know that the night economy in general is risky.

“There have been outbreaks associated with nightclubs, which are obviously closed here, as well as bars and restaurants. We have known this for months.

"The longer people are in these places, the more likely they are to leave their vigilance behind and the mix of social distancing and alcohol is not a good one despite the best efforts of customs officers and venue owners."

Others believe the 10pm curfew is arbitrary and will still be ineffective. Exeter University epidemiologist Dr. Bharat Pankhania told the BBC: "The virus does not understand the clock. So if you close at 10pm, what about 9pm, what about 8pm?"

It is believed that Cabinet Minister Michael Gove, along with Mr Hancock, were interested in swift and decisive action to suppress the coronavirus. "The scientific evidence speaks for itself," he is reported to have told them.

Government scholars also reportedly told the Prime Minister that a 10pm curfew in pubs and restaurants would only tighten drinkers, claiming "all we know is that bans work".

Concerns that the shutdown could go on indefinitely if transmission does not decrease significantly raised alarm bells in the Treasury Department, fearing the economic cost would be high.

Mr Sunak reportedly compromised with Mr Johnson by asking him, "Can you get the things you need financially to keep going while being tough on large groups of people hanging out in parks which are not has economic consequences? " However, the new restrictions are believed to go well beyond what the Chancellor wants and not far enough in the eyes of the Minister of Health and scientists.

London Mayor Sadiq Khan announced last night that he was planning new “restrictions” in the capital, including encouraging more employees to work from home, reintroducing the two-meter rule and expanding the number of locations where masks are required.

Government sources confirmed yesterday evening that the new restrictions will include a national curfew at 10 p.m. on all hotel operations.

From Thursday, all pubs, restaurants, casinos and other hospitality businesses must close their doors early and operate a model with table service only.

Capital Economics warned last night that a 10 p.m. curfew on restaurants and bars by the end of the year would cost the economy £ 4.5 billion over that period.

Simon Emeny, head of the Fullers pub chain, said he was "very, very concerned" about the idea of ​​"imposing more regulations on this industry at a time when we are just about to get back to business".

Professor Vallances PROJECTION of Covid cases in the UK by mid-October: 50,000 per day. The REALITY, if we repeat the echo in France and Spain: 10,000 a day

By Sophie Borland, health editor for the Daily Mail

Scientists have questioned whether the UK is likely to see 50,000 new infections per day by next month, as predicted by the government's scientific adviser.

Sir Patrick Vallance said yesterday that he believes the epidemic is doubling every seven days, which would result in 200 deaths a day by mid-November.

The Principal Scientific Advisor emphasized that there are many unknowns behind these projections.

He said, “If, and that's a pretty big if, but if this goes on unabated and this grows and doubles every seven days … if this goes on you would have about 50,000 cases a day in mid-October. & # 39; Sir Patrick stated that the surge in cases in the UK was in close line with trends in France and Spain and referred to a graph to illustrate this.

Scientists have questioned whether the UK is likely to see 50,000 new infections per day by next month, as predicted by the government's scientific adviser. If the UK continued to follow trends in these two countries, cases would be 10,000 a day by next month. And if they jumped to 50,000 a day by the next month, they'd be off the scales compared to France and Spain instead of following them

Scientists have questioned whether the UK is likely to see 50,000 new infections per day by next month, as predicted by the government's scientific adviser. If the UK continued to follow trends in these two countries, cases would be 10,000 a day by next month. And if they jumped to 50,000 a day by the next month, they'd be off the scales compared to France and Spain instead of following them

Chief Medical Officer Professor Chris Whitty

UK Senior Scientific Adviser Sir Patrick Vallance

It has been heavily criticized by experts from the government's leading scientists, UK chief medical officer Professor Chris Whitty (left) and UK chief adviser Sir Patrick Vallance (right) after presenting a "doomsday" scenario of 50,000 coronavirus cases per day a month – which does not appear to be supported by data from France and Spain

However, if the UK continued to follow trends in these two countries, cases would be 10,000 a day by next month. And if they jumped to 50,000 a day by next month, they'd be off the scales compared to France and Spain instead of following them. Another point of contention concerns the rate of growth of the virus, the rate at which cases are increasing.

The UK's current growth rate is between 2 and 7 percent, according to government figures last Friday.

A third of the Welsh population will be locked into a "worrying and rapid" surge in Covid cases from 6pm tomorrow as cities like Newport and Merthyr Tydfil have tough new rules

Almost a third of the Welsh population will face curfew from tomorrow due to a "worrying and rapid" surge in Covid-19 cases.

The Bridgend, Merthyr Tydfil, Newport and Blaenau Gwent areas will be subject to the new regulations from 6pm.

Pubs and bars are required to close by 11 p.m. and meeting people outside your own household is now prohibited. All licensed premises must close at 11 p.m.

The latest measures raise the number of people affected by local lockdowns in South Wales to 850,000 after Caerphilly and Rhondda Cynon Taf counties also received new rules last week.

Health Minister Vaughan Gething said there has been "a worrying and rapid rise" in cases of Covid-19 in the four areas of South Wales.

Mr Gething said many of the coronavirus cases have been linked to people talking indoors without physical distancing.

"We are seeing evidence of the spread of the coronavirus," Gething said at a press conference in Cardiff.

If virus cases doubled every day, the growth rate would be just over 10 percent. Officials could be expecting the rate of growth to rise – as it has for the past few weeks – but this was not explained at yesterday's meeting.

Scientists also pointed out that restrictions imposed in recent weeks, including the "six-point rule" and local bans, would lower the rate of infection. Professor Paul Hunter, Professor of Medicine at the University of East Anglia's Norwich Medical School, said, “What you presented is the worst case given the current state of the epidemic.

“I find it rather implausible that we will see 50,000 cases a day by mid-October. It is important to remember that they were not making a prediction, but rather presenting an example of what would happen if the cases continued to double, which they almost certainly will not. & # 39;

He said that the growth of an outbreak tends to slow down as it approaches its climax, adding: "I wouldn't be surprised if we followed France and Spain's development over the next few weeks – it is entirely plausible that we would 10,000 would see cases each day through mid-October. & # 39;

Dr. Michael Head, Senior Research Fellow on Global Health at the University of Southampton, said the 50,000 a day figure was a "worst case scenario".

He added, "Cases are very unlikely to occur at this level as interventions are being put in place to limit the spread of the virus, such as regional lockdowns."

Nigel Marriott, an independent statistician, claimed that while cases doubled in parts of the north, they actually decreased in some regions of the south. He added, "This regional inequality makes the national picture difficult to interpret and it suggests that the goal should be to stop the north wave as soon as possible before it can propagate south."

Meanwhile, the UK alert level for Covid-19 was raised from three to four last night as government advisors warned that virus cases are likely to increase "exponentially". The decision was made by the country's four senior doctors, who urged the public to follow basic hygiene and social distancing practices to avoid "significant excessive deaths".

Health Secretary Matt Hancock said: "This country is now facing a turning point in its response and it is important that everyone now do their part to stop the spread of the virus and save lives." This was followed by a rare televised address from Sir Patrick and Professor Chris Whitty, Chief Medical Officer for England.

Professor Whitty appealed to the unselfishness of the public to follow the rules and not just assume that they could "take their own risk". He said, “The problem with a pandemic or infection is that as an individual, I increase my risk, the risk for everyone around me and for everyone who has contact with them.

"Sooner or later the chain will lead to people who are vulnerable, older or have a long-term problem with Covid." Despite the gloomy tone of the briefing, Sir Patrick said there was a possibility that a vaccine might be available by the end of the year.

Thirty-two scientists urge Boris Johnson to think twice about putting Britain into a second lockdown – as critics question the advisors' suggestion that UK cases could DOUBLED each week without action

By Eleanor Hayward, health reporter for the Daily Mail

In an open letter to Boris Johnson yesterday, more than 30 health experts criticized "harmful" plans to impose blanket lockdown measures.

They argued that instead of nationwide restrictions that wreak havoc on the economy and public health, ministers should only impose "targeted measures".

This would include a strategy to protect the most vulnerable Britons, including those in nursing homes.

The letter was addressed to the Prime Minister, Chancellor Rishi Sunak, Professor Chris Whitty and Sir Patrick Vallance, calling on them to "fundamentally reconsider the way forward".

A group of scientists and doctors have written to the prime minister asking him not to opt for a second lockdown and to stop presenting Covid-19 as a deadly threat

A group of scientists and doctors have written to the prime minister asking him not to opt for a second lockdown and to stop presenting Covid-19 as a deadly threat

It drew attention to the disastrous health effects of the lockdown, such as: B. Delays in diagnosis, claiming this could cause an additional 60,000 cancer deaths.

The authors included Professor Karol Sikora, Consultant Oncologist at the University of Buckingham, and Professor Carl Heneghan, Oxford University.

It was signed by 32 leading physicians and academics from diverse backgrounds, including intensive care advisor Dr. Ron Daniels, Head of the UK Sepsis Trust.

Who signed the letter?

  • Professor Sunetra Gupta (Oxford)
  • Professor Carl Heneghan (Oxford)
  • Professor Karol Sikora (U. von Buckingham)
  • Sam Williams (Economic Insight)
  • Professor Louise Allan (Exeter)
  • Professor Francois Balloux (UCL)
  • Professor Sucharit Bhakdi (JG University Main)
  • Dr. Julii Brainard (U. of East Anglia)
  • Professor Anthony Brookes (Leicester)
  • Professor Nick Colegrave (Edinburgh)
  • Dr. Ron Daniels (UK Sepsis Trust)
  • Professor Robert Dingwall (Nottingham Trent)
  • Professor Fionn Dunne (Imperial Coll.)
  • Professor Kim Fox (Imperial Coll.)
  • Professor Anthony Glass (Sheffield)
  • Dr. Andy Gaya (consulting oncologist)
  • Dr. Peter Grove (Former Health Department)
  • Professor Matt Hickman (Bristol)
  • Professor Elizabeth Hughes (Leeds)
  • Dr. Tom Jefferson (Oxford)
  • Professor Syma Khalid (Southampton)
  • Professor David Miles (Imperial Coll.)
  • Professor Paul Ormerod (UCL)
  • Professor Andrew Oswald (Warwick)
  • Professor David Paton (Nottingham)
  • Professor Hugh Pennington (Aberdeen)
  • Professor Barbara Pierscionek (Staffordshire)
  • Professor Eve Roman (York)
  • Professor Justin Stebbing (Imperial)
  • Professor Ellen Townsend (Nottingham)
  • Steve Westaby (retired cardiac surgeon)
  • Professor Simon Wood (Edinburgh)

They argued that the government's strategy of suppressing the virus until there is a vaccine is "increasingly impracticable" and "causing significant harm in all age groups".

The letter says: "Instead, more targeted measures that protect the most vulnerable people from Covid without adversely affecting those not at risk should be better supported. Given the high proportion of Covid deaths in nursing homes, these should be given priority. "

The experts argued that targeted measures must be the "logical cornerstone of our future strategy".

It warned: "Blanket Covid interventions are likely to have a high cost because of the adverse impact they have on the entire population." The effects on cancer are "particularly acute" and Cancer Research UK has warned of two million late or missed cancer treatments and tests.

The letter also pointed to the devastating economic consequences of measures like curfews on pubs and restaurants.

The authors emphasized that younger healthy adults have a low risk of death, accounting for 89 percent of deaths in those over 65. "With that in mind, our strategy should therefore focus on measures to protect the most vulnerable," they said.

“For example, the death rate in Germany among patients over 70 is the same as in most European countries. However, the effective reduction in deaths is based on a successful strategy to limit infections in those over 70 years of age. "

There was little evidence that blanket nationwide lockdowns were effective in reducing the number of deaths from Covid, and caution has been urged.

However, another letter, also written by a separate group of health experts yesterday, supported nationwide restrictions.

It warned that restarting the economy during the pandemic could be "long-term harmful".

The opposing letters highlighted the gap between science and medicine about best course of action.

In the second letter, published in the British Medical Journal, the signatories supported ongoing efforts to "suppress the virus throughout the population, rather than pursuing a policy of segmenting or protecting those at risk until" herd immunity "emerges. has developed".

It was signed by experts such as Trisha Greenhalgh, Professor of Primary Care at Oxford University, and Professor Martin McKee of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

The letter warned that it was "virtually impossible" to cut off vulnerable people, especially disadvantaged groups such as people living in "cramped quarters and multi-generational households" or grandparents who provide childcare.

A government spokesman said, "This is a new virus and we have been advised by SAGE experts at every stage. Our response made sure the NHS wasn't overwhelmed, even at the height of the virus, so everyone could always get the best care possible.

& # 39; As the Chief Medical Officer and Chief Scientific Advisor have pointed out, we are critical of why we as a society must now take action to reverse these trends and save lives while protecting education and the economy.

"For everyone, this means washing hands, wearing face covering, practicing social distancing, and isolating yourself if you may have come into contact with the virus."

Sip! From our stark, strict, odd couple, optimism ran like blood from a stone: HENRY DEEDES observes Patrick Dallance and Chris Whitty's dark message to the nation

By Henry Deedes for the Daily Mail

Anyone waking up gloomy-eyed from a weekend of heavily drunk celebrations might well have assumed that there was an overnight coup. All over the airwave, no matter which way you turned, looked two slightly sinister government agents wearing dark suits and pale shirts, both of whom wore no-one responsible authority.

Her tone was strict, her message strong. Citizens of England: Listen to us now.

Monday morning, 11 a.m., and Sir Patrick Vallance and Chris Whitty were preparing the country for yet another extended period of forced hibernation. The dreaded second wave was officially upon us.

Our venue was an unknown location on Downing Street. Gray background, sterile atmosphere. This musty old meeting room had finally got the film. So first wave, Dahling.

Vallance led the way, as he has done so often in this crisis. He is the scholar in this strange pairing. The polite Jack Lemmon to Whitty's grunted Walther Matthau. That said, it had a slightly aggressive new buzz cut.

HENRY DEEDES: Monday morning, 11am, and Sir Patrick Vallance and Chris Whitty were preparing the country for yet another extended period of forced hibernation. The dreaded second wave was officially upon us

HENRY DEEDES: Monday morning, 11am, and Sir Patrick Vallance and Chris Whitty were preparing the country for yet another extended period of forced hibernation. The dreaded second wave was officially upon us

Note to Lady Vallance: next time you may turn the clipper to a higher setting.

He wasted no time getting to his killer slide. This was the bone cooler. Exhibition A, to scurry us all back under the sheets.

A diagram with colored circles showed how the current infection rate doubled every seven days. By mid-October we were on our way to 50,000 new cases a day. This would result in a 200 daily death rate.

Vallance's presentation was as clear as a carafe made of cut glass: we need to slow the spread. "It takes speed," he said. "It takes action."

Equally worrying was his discovery that less than eight percent of the population were immune to Covid. Yikes I would have assumed it was at least three times that amount. Sir Patrick is probably not one of them. He is one of the few members in the prime minister's inner circle who has not yet contracted the disease.

Professor Whitty entered the fight. Oh oh. Optimism flows from Whitty about as freely as blood oozes out of stone. He announced that the country had turned a corner. "In a bad way," he warned. He added that the flare-up couldn't have come at a worse time as temperatures are starting to drop. "The seasons are against us."

HENRY DEEDES: Stand by for more constraints, more misery, and more economic turmoil. It's going to be a long winter

HENRY DEEDES: Stand by for more constraints, more misery, and more economic turmoil. It's going to be a long winter

Whitty's eyes moved in their glue. He has a special relationship with this disease. He seems to both hate it and admire it at the same time.

At the beginning of the crisis, he always seemed pretty puzzled about it. It worries him more and more over time.

He rejected the idea that this was a milder virus than the one we had seen in the spring. There was a plea for people to take collective responsibility. "This is not someone else's problem," he warned. "That's all our problem."

I felt that this message was especially addressed to the youth. It will be a struggle to get them locked again.

If the purpose of this exercise was to frighten people, I would say mission accomplished.

Whitty, in particular, was not afraid of piling up the prophecies of darkness. "If we don't change course," he said, "we will find ourselves in a difficult problem."

We have been thrown the strange crumb of consolation.

For starters, we're far better at treating patients than we were in March. New drugs like dexamethasone would help lower the death rate. Whitty referred to the new restrictions as a "six month problem".

"It's not indefinite," he said. "Science will ride to our salvation in due course." It was doubly reassuring from old, gloomy chops.

Sir Patrick made some positive noises about a vaccine. He hoped that small quantities could be available by the end of the year. "Good progress is being made," he said. However, a breakthrough in the next year seemed more likely.

Meanwhile, the outlook was bleak.

"We have to control this," Sir Patrick insisted. In other words, you stand by for more constraints, more misery and more economic turmoil. It's going to be a long, cold winter.

RICHARD LITTLEJOHN: After the two Ronnies of Doom, this is the speech Boris Johnson SHOULD give

By Richard Littlejohn for the Daily Mail

Boris Johnson is expected today to announce further restrictions on our freedom to prevent the coronavirus surge.

Like Al Pacino, as Michael Corleone in Godfather III, they pull us back just when we thought we were out.

The new rules could include forcing pubs to close either prematurely or entirely, suspending efforts to convince people to return to their offices, and fines of £ 10,000 for those who fail to self-isolate.

Yesterday the ground was prepared by the Prime Minister's non-singing, non-dancing warm-up, Chief Scientific Advisor Sir Patrick Vallance and Chief Medical Officer Professor Chris Whitty.

Sitting 6 feet apart behind a newscaster-style desk, The Two Ronnies of Doom came up with an alarming forecast of a rising death toll backed by speculative graphs based on "science" – what most of us call "guesswork." “Would denote.

Boris Johnson (pictured on Monday) is expected to announce further restrictions on our freedom to prevent a surge in the coronavirus on Tuesday

Boris Johnson (pictured on Monday) is expected to announce further restrictions on our freedom to prevent the coronavirus surge on Tuesday

You could have looked at another graph from yesterday's Daily Mail that showed about 450 people die of cancer every day, compared to just 21 of – or should that be? – Coronavirus. Five people die in traffic accidents every day. Those under the age of 50 are more likely to get hit by a bus than to ingest a fatal dose of Covid.

But with the government's approach of treating the corona pandemic better than sad, that would be enough to justify closing every road in the UK.

Wait. Come and think about it, that's exactly what they're doing.

During the dark days of yesterday, you will all die! Diatribe, Vallance and Whitty even managed to turn the language around by talking about Britain being around the corner – and not in a good way. When normal people talk about turning the corner, it usually means things are getting better.

Things can only get worse for the Two Ronnies. If we don't do what we're told, it will be a good night from me, a good night from him, and a good night Vienna for the rest of us. They insisted that this was not a prediction, just a way of looking at things, and even once admitted that their worst-case scenario was based on a “big if”.

Why does Boris let himself be guided by these two merchants of misery and not by Oxford University medical professors Carl Heneghan and Tom Jefferson, who accuse ministers of crashing the economy because of poor statistics and ill-informed advice?

On Sunday they wrote in the mail: "The prime minister might as well use the planets to guide us through this pandemic."

This is exactly the kind of imaginative turn Boris would have produced in his previous free-spirited incarnation as a libertarian newspaper columnist.

But since he signed Covid, he has transformed from a risky iconoclast to an extremely risk-averse statesman.

What he doesn't understand is that when we voted for him we thought we would vote for Boris 1.0.

Before Boris decided to jump into the EU referendum, he is said to have written two columns – one for vacation and one for staying.

Let's hope he's prepared two speeches before he gets up on his hind legs today. And that he tore up the first version at the last minute, declared another series of bans for six months and rediscovered his inner libertarian.

Oxford University Medicine Professors Carl Heneghan (above) and Tom Jefferson said that "the Prime Minister might as well use the planets to guide us through this pandemic".

Oxford University Medicine Professors Carl Heneghan (above) and Tom Jefferson said that "the Prime Minister might as well use the planets to guide us through this pandemic".

It could go something like this …

Friends, zookeepers, compatriots, lend me your ears. I'm not coming to appease Covid, I come to bury it. For too long our great nation has huddled in front of this vile invader.

I promised to run the most open and transparent administration in history. That is why I am determined to coordinate with you on this brutally honest and unprecedented progress report.

For the past six months, we have sacrificed our economy – and indeed our sanity – on the shaky altar of this pandemic. Even the old bojo went a little goofy with the Grim Reaper after my own brush.

I would like to believe that what we did wrong was wrong for the right reasons. In the beginning we knew as little about this plague as the Chinese did about the Duckworth-Lewis method of deciding on cricket games. It was a riddle that was wrapped up in a riddle. And in the words of one of my esteemed predecessors as Prime Minister we were "fries".

We relied too much on the coffins, who weren't smarter than anybody else. While early precautions were just prudent, we unnecessarily locked the country because we had no idea what to do next.

I admit that most of the time we made it up over time, hoping like Micawber that something would show up.

If we continue to be guided by science, the consequences will be disastrous. The so-called experts want us to block again because they do not admit their mistakes.

& # 39; Your predictions turned out to be the inverted pyramid of Piffle. You're like a sherry-mad old widow who lost the family silver at roulette and now decides to double up by betting on the house too.

It's time for me to regain control. As another of my famous predecessors once said, scientists should be on tap, not on top.

Our overreaction to this diabolical beetle has already done to the economy what Vesuvius did to ancient Pompeii.

Covid fear has done more damage to London than the Air Force.

But we beat the Hun and we can beat the corona, not by crouching in our air raid shelters, but by recapturing our lightning spirit.

Starting today, all restrictions on freedom of movement and assembly, as well as ridiculous road closures, cycle paths and widened sidewalks will be lifted.

Face masks can be worn by Nervous Nellies, but no one will be punished for not wearing one. Social distance if you wish, but we trust you will use your common sense.

The British should be able to make their own decisions with the freedom and exhilaration of our Woad-painted ancestors.

On Monday, scientific advisor Sir Patrick Vallance and medical director Professor Chris Whitty issued an alarming forecast for a rising death toll (both above).

On Monday, scientific advisor Sir Patrick Vallance and medical director Professor Chris Whitty issued an alarming forecast for a rising death toll (both above).

We're going to stop teaching you the need to lose weight. It is a personal choice. Sincerely, it did manage to shed a little bit of fat but my policy on cake has always been to have it and eat it.

There is absolutely no one but you who can stop you sneaking down in the middle of the night to clean up the edges of that piece of cheese on the back of the fridge.

It's your funeral, and as of today, the number of mourners is no longer limited to 30. The rule of six was torn open.

The seven dwarfs are restored in their full equipment. Hi-ho, hi-ho, it's back to work, we're going. And every officer who refuses to report to the office on Monday will be dismissed without further ado.

This is not the end of the beginning or even the beginning of the end, this is the end of crouching and hoping for the best.

We will fight Covid in the streets, in the pubs and in the theaters.

We will also fight on the beaches once we have removed all of the dinghies from Calais.

We have nothing to fear but ourselves to fear. Most people have about as many chances of dying from Covid as finding Elvis on Mars, being beheaded by a Frisbee, or being reborn as an Olive.

Naysayers and doom-mongers may warn that this new libertarian approach is ruthless and will result in disaster.

But my friends, as I have discovered myself, there are no disasters, only opportunities. And, indeed, opportunities for new disasters.

So let the freedom ring out again. No more shy clarification island. The standing army of the Covid marshals was demobbled. The coffins were returned to their boxes.

The two Ronnies of Doom have been canceled. So it's a good night for me and a good night for her.

Good night!

(tagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) Nachrichten (t) Coronavirus (t) Professor Chris Whitty (t) Boris Johnson (t) Matt Hancock