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Boris Johnson warns of a "more expensive" blocking of NATIONAL, which cannot be ruled out


Boris Johnson asked the British to stick to his coronavirus plan tonight when he warned that a "more expensive" second full lockdown could not be ruled out

Boris Johnson asked the British to stick to his coronavirus plan tonight when he warned that a "more expensive" second full lockdown will be imposed if the public does not behave better.

Speaking at a # 10 press conference with Chris Whitty and Patrick Vallance, the Prime Minister said it was too early to assess whether the 6pm and 10pm pubs curfew, introduced in the past 14 days, is working.

And he said the risk of the virus taking its course could overwhelm the NHS and cause many more deaths.

However, alluding to growing concerns about the consequences of restrictions, Mr Johnson said he intended to update the public "more regularly" in the coming weeks.

The plea came as government maps highlighted the country's geographic divide in coronavirus infections – with the north seeing a far bigger surge.

Mr Johnson said the country was in a "critical moment" and would not hesitate to introduce new measures if necessary.

"If we work together now, we will give ourselves the best possible chance to avoid this result and avoid further action," he said.

“I know some people will think we should give up and let the virus run its course, despite the enormous loss of life that could possibly result.

“I have to say that I deeply disagree. I don't think the British people want that. I don't think they want to throw the sponge in. They want to fight and defeat this virus and we will. & # 39;

“Even as we fight Covid, it's important that people get the treatment they need for other diseases.

"But I have to be clear that if the NHS were overwhelmed by Covid then no one could get such care."

Sir Patrick highlighted the surge in infections since early September and said grimly, "Things are definitely going in the wrong direction."

Prof. Whitty hit back his critics, saying they accused him of being "too optimistic and too pessimistic about numbers". But he said the government failed to realize in March how quickly the virus was spreading and the bug could not be repeated. In gloomy news, Prof. Whitty said: "We have a long winter ahead of us."

Earlier, Mr Johnson finally bowed to demand that MPs vote before new lockdown restrictions – after angry spokesman Lindsay Hoyle beat him up for treating the Commons with "contempt".

He was at the side of Prof. Whitty and Sir Patrick tonight, despite the scholars falling away from such briefings under heavy pressure, with complaints that they are being used as "propaganda" to support increasingly draconian restrictions.

MailOnline assumes that cabinet hawks are increasingly frustrated by the dire warnings from medical and scientific leaders of a second wave.

Former Downing Street workers urged the government to move the experts out of the spotlight, warning they were not great communicators. This gave the impression that decisions were clear and not a matter of judgment by the ministers.

Senior Conservative Sir Bernard Jenkin upped the ante today by pointing out that the government uses "science as propaganda".

Another hectic day in the coronavirus crisis:

  • Britain today recorded 7,108 more coronavirus cases and an additional 71 deaths – including a three-month high of seven in Scotland;
  • Bank of England chief economist Andy Haldane has called for optimism about the country's outlook, warning that a chicken lick stance could hurt the recovery.
  • Economy Minister Alok Sharma faced a backlash after yesterday blaming "gotcha" questions for the prime minister's confusion over lockdown rules for the northeast.
  • Ministers fear that the public will show increasing signs of "lockdown fatigue" as the pandemic drags on and rules become more complicated.
The Prime Minister showed the latest slides on the status of the coronavirus at press conference # 10 tonight

The Prime Minister showed the latest slides on the status of the coronavirus at press conference # 10 tonight

Chris Whitty, Chief Medical Officer, and Patrick Vallance, Chief Science Officer, attended the Cabinet meeting in Whitehall today

Chris Whitty, Chief Medical Officer, and Patrick Vallance, Chief Science Officer, attended the Cabinet meeting in Whitehall today

Alok Sharma faces a backlash after blaming the Prime Minister for "gotcha" issues that botched his OWN Covid lockdown rules

Boris Johnson's allies have been charged with apologizing for "incompetence" today after "Gotcha" was blamed for his crap over coronavirus lockdown guidelines.

The Prime Minister was ridiculed after embarrassing himself yesterday about the draconian rules being imposed on households in the northeast.

The mistake sparked a rare apology from Mr Johnson, who admitted that he had "spoken wrongly" by suggesting that different households in groups of six could legally connect indoors.

It has also sparked a furious Tory insurrection over the government, which imposed restrictions on millions of people without parliamentary scrutiny, amid growing concerns over the devastating economic and employment effects.

Whips are desperately trying to strike a deal with rebels who tonight tabled an amendment to a crunch motion renewing the sweeping powers of the coronavirus law.

Tory MPs insisted there is no hope for ordinary members of the public if Mr Johnson cannot "keep up" with changes by the government.

But Economic Secretary Alok Sharma cleared the excitement this morning, accusing journalists of turning the situation into a "quiz show" and saying people should check the councils' websites instead of listening to the prime minister.

& # 39; With regard to this question, there is a slight & # 39; Gotcha & # 39; element. You're a flagship when it comes to serious news, and it's not a quiz show, ”he told BBC Radio 4's Today program.

Prof. Whitty told the Downing Street briefing that test positivity had "increased significantly" in the northeast and northwest of England, as well as in Yorkshire and the Humber.

"This increase is accelerating quite quickly in some of these areas," he said.

He said the rates among school-age children "really don't change very much".

But he said hospital stays are increasing, particularly at hotspots, although the numbers remain "at much lower levels than in early April".

Professor Whitty added, "We caution that the direction of travel is in the wrong direction for both hospitals and intensive care units, especially in those areas where cases have been increasing rapidly."

Sir Patrick said, “It is very clear that prices are still going up.

“And so we don't have it under control at the moment.

"And the bumps Chris (Whitty) described in some areas are worrying and … will create more problems."

Earlier, Health Secretary Matt Hancock had announced the concessions in the House of Representatives, stating that the government would consult Parliament on any restrictions across England or the UK and that a vote would take place "wherever possible" in advance.

"Today I can confirm to the House that we will be consulting Parliament on important national measures having effect across England or the UK – wherever possible we will vote before such rules come into force," he said.

"But, of course, responding to the virus means the government must act quickly if necessary and we cannot comply with urgent regulations that are necessary to fight the virus and save lives."

Sir Graham Brady, who led the Tory Revolt, hailed the rise – which followed weeks of tension with the back benches.

The move came after Sir Lindsay issued an extraordinary reprimand complaining about the abuse of ministerial powers to deal with the public health crisis.

Sir Lindsay read the riot to the Prime Minister as he sat in silence in the chamber, making it clear that he was ready to join dozens of Tory rebels and opposition parties to ensure more control – and warned that the government was acting now must in order to restore "confidence".

"The government must go to greater lengths to speed up action so that this House can debate and decide on the most important measures at the earliest possible opportunity," he said.

"I now expect the government to rebuild trust in this house and not treat it with the contempt it showed."

The spokesman rejected an amendment tabled by Tory rebels to a motion to renew the powers of the coronavirus law, which would have led to forced votes before new measures were introduced – it would violate parliamentary procedure. However, the intervention was enough to trigger an immediate change in government.

In an extraordinary attack on the House of Commons that Mr Johnson listened to, Sir Lindsay slammed the way the government drove through restrictions.

"The way the government has exercised its powers to issue secondary legislation during this crisis has been utterly unsatisfactory," he said.

“Too often, key legal instruments have been published a few hours before they came into force and some explanations of why key measures came into force before they can be adopted in this House have been inconclusive and show a total disregard for the House.

"The government must make a greater effort to prepare measures more quickly so that this House can debate and decide on the most important measures at the earliest possible time."

He added, "I now expect the government to rebuild confidence in this house and not treat it with the contempt it has shown."

Sir Graham Brady, the influential chairman of the 1922 committee that tabled the amendment, said he remained confident that the government would make concessions on the powers of the coronavirus.

In a statement, he said: “The spokesman has set out his reasons for not selecting amendments, but has also made it clear that he expects the government to ensure proper and timely parliamentary scrutiny.

"I hope the government will respond appropriately this afternoon."

Downing Street has signaled that the government has reached a compromise with rebels who have been calling for votes on new coronavirus restrictions.

A rebel source also said Health Secretary Matt Hancock will outline an agreement when he opens the Commons debate.

When asked about Sir Lindsay Hoyle's criticism of the government, Spokesman # 10 said: “The Prime Minister and the Minister of Health have recognized that we are looking ahead to further ways of bringing Parliament into the process and we know the importance of it this is Both houses need to discuss and question all coronavirus regulations.

Nursing homes "wait up to three weeks for Covid results"

Nursing homes wait up to three weeks to get their coronavirus test results. This was claimed today as the UK fiasco continues.

The government had promised to have caregivers wipe every week and residents every 28 days so new cases could be exposed quickly and in isolation.

However, the "world-leading" test system cannot turn the samples over in time because it is struggling to overcome a constantly growing sample jam.

Nursing home leaders have warned that the problem is "getting worse, not better" because "test results are not coming back quickly enough".

The backlog contributes to the ongoing UK test crisis that erupted earlier this month after demand massively exceeded capacity. The ministers warned that the shortage would last for weeks.

Numerous Britons, including nurses and doctors, complained that they couldn't be swabbed because of the disease – even though some car locations were completely empty. Others had to travel hundreds of miles to find out if they were infected or not.

"At the same time, it remains important that we can act quickly to stop the virus from spreading, as we did during the pandemic, and I am sure you will hear more about it from the Minister of Health this afternoon."

When asked if an agreement had been reached, the spokesman said, "I cannot anticipate what the Minister of Health will say and as you can imagine, the appropriate place for an announcement would be in the House of Commons."

Mr Johnson did not refer to the speaker's stinging criticism when he got on his feet for PMQs afterward.

There has been increased unrest among MPs over the influence of Prof. Whitty and Sir Patrick on the government's approach. A Cabinet Hawk told MailOnline that Mr Johnson had no choice but to act in light of the dire warnings he received. "You can understand why the prime minister has to be careful when he is told that tens of thousands will die," they said.

The minister added that the government was now being given "more comprehensive" advice from experts. "The hawks in the cabinet are much happier with the formation of opinions than they are," they said.

The source pointed out that opinions differ widely among scientists and that ministers need to be confident that they will have an opinion. “At the beginning of the crisis, we were much more enthusiastic about the scientists. But there is a big difference between doubling every seven days and every 20 days, ”they said.

“We speak more broadly to people with different views. It could be that people like Carl Heneghan have the correct assessment. & # 39;

& # 39; The modeling is not accurate at all. It just gives you a general idea of ​​what could happen. & # 39;

The prime minister convened his cabinet this morning after embarrassing himself over the draconian rules being imposed on households in the northeast.

The mistake sparked a rare apology from Mr Johnson, who admitted that he had "spoken wrongly" by suggesting that different households in groups of six could legally connect indoors.

Tory MPs insisted there is no hope for ordinary members of the public if Mr Johnson cannot "keep up" with changes by the government.

But Economic Secretary Alok Sharma knocked down criticism this morning, accused journalists of asking questions, and turned the situation into a quiz show. He said people should check the councils' websites instead of listening to the prime minister.

& # 39; With regard to this question, there is a slight & # 39; Gotcha & # 39; element. You're a flagship when it comes to serious news, and it's not a quiz show, ”he told BBC Radio 4's Today program.

When asked if he thought it was as trivial as a quiz question to ask ministers to explain their coronavirus regulations, he said, “No, absolutely not. But I am telling you it is important that if people want to understand the exact restrictions they have in areas that are more restricted, go to the (local authorities) websites. & # 39;

A terrible day for the government began yesterday when Skills Minister Gillian Keegan suffered a series of car accident interviews Tuesday morning, admitting that she was unable to answer key questions about new curbs that went into effect from midnight.

After a speech at Exeter College in Devon later, Mr. Johnson asked about the Northeast lockdown: “Under the rule of six outside of areas like the Northeast where additional action has been taken, there are six inside and six outside.

Sir Lindsay read the riot to the Prime Minister as he sat in silence in the chamber, making it clear that he was willing to join dozens of Tory rebels and opposition parties to ensure more control - and warned that the government should act now must in order to restore "confidence"

Sir Lindsay read the riot to the Prime Minister as he sat in silence in the chamber, making it clear that he was willing to join dozens of Tory rebels and opposition parties to ensure more control – and warned that the government should act now must in order to restore "confidence"

In the picture from left to right, Boris Johnson, the new Cabinet Secretary Simon Case, Matt Hancock and Michael Gove are leaving Downing Street and heading to the Foreign Office today where the Cabinet is being held because there is more room for social distancing

In the picture from left to right, Boris Johnson, the new Cabinet Secretary Simon Case, Matt Hancock and Michael Gove are leaving Downing Street and heading to the Foreign Office today where the Cabinet is being held because there is more room for social distancing

“And in the northeast and other areas where particularly strict measures have been taken, you should follow instructions from local authorities.

“But it's six in a house or six in hospitality, but as I understand it, not six outside. That's the situation there. & # 39;

Whitehall sources claimed No10 was blind to Matt Hancock's decision to push the new restrictions, which were only expected later this week.

But the confusion raised questions

Former Secretary Steve Baker, one of the rebel leaders who is pushing for parliament to play a bigger role in deciding on the lockdown, said this shows the confusion that has been caused.

The UK's economic slump at the height of the coronavirus lockdown wasn't quite as bad as expected – but GDP still fell a record 19.8% in the second quarter

The official figures for the decline in GDP in the three months to June have been cut from 20.4 percent to 19.8 percent. However, the magnitude of the decline still makes it the largest in modern history

The official figures for the decline in GDP in the three months to June have been cut from 20.4 percent to 19.8 percent. However, the magnitude of the decline still makes it the largest in modern history

The UK's economic slump at the height of the coronavirus lockdown wasn't quite as bad as expected – but it was still the worst in modern history.

The official figures for the decline in GDP in the three months to June have been cut from 20.4 percent to 19.8 percent.

However, the magnitude of the decline still makes it the largest ever recorded.

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) has also concluded that UK plc underperformed in the first quarter of the year.

The economy contracted 2.5 percent between January and March from the previous estimate of 2.2 percent.

Total GDP is now 21.8 percent lower than it was at the end of 2019 – underscoring the threat to millions of jobs as Boris Johnson struggles to get the country back on track and handle a surge in cases.

There were some signs of hope, with the Bank of England indicating that the recovery so far has been better than expected.

Separate figures released earlier this month showed that GDP rose 6.6 percent in July.

He told BBC Radio 4's Today, “I think it was a vivid example of the problems you have when a hundred laws of parliament are used to introduce 247, I believe, pieces of delegated legislation that repeats must be change and revocation.

“When you get such a big and changing law, you even find ministers and the prime minister can't keep up.

What possible hope can the public have? I had a minister say to me yesterday, with horror in my eyes at the disease, that we may have to change the law every 24 hours.

"We can't possibly expect 70 million people to keep up with the law, which changes every 24 hours – that would be chaos and ruin."

Senior Tory Sir Bernard Jenkin also raised the temperature by accusing ministers of using science for "propaganda".

"We saw intelligence agencies being used as propaganda during the Iraq war," he told Times Radio.

"The scientists are not there to explain what the government has deemed necessary."

Mr Sharma hinted that concessions might be on the way as the government tries to quell a Commons rebellion over coronavirus laws.

Mr Sharma said, “The reason we have to get these in pretty quickly sometimes is to actually protect people – and I know all MPs, Steve (Baker) and others totally understand that – and the problem is control.

“If we've put restrictions in place, we have to make sure that there is a vote within 28 days, otherwise they will expire.

"But colleagues are asking if there is any way to get involved before decisions are made, and I know that we in the government will look into this and come up with some suggestions."

When asked if there would be concessions, the minister said: "We are looking around, as I said – I do not want to anticipate anything that will come of it."

The Prime Minister's mistake had nasty echoes of Lucas's skit that aired on Channel 4 at the start of the Great British Bake Off last week.

The comedian was dressed as Mr. Johnson and was attending a fake press conference on Downing Street. Lucas mocked the complicated rules, telling people to "bake in a tent" if they have to, before adding, "don't bake in a tent."

The government is desperate to ease a mutiny among the dozens of MPs who stood behind an amendment by backbench chief Sir Graham Brady. It insists that commons votes should be held before any future restrictions are put in place.

Mr Johnson asked the Tory rebels to work with him to avoid a harmful uprising – although Spokesman Lindsay Hoyle is not expected to put the amendment to a vote tonight.

A Tory MP in the northeast told the Telegraph: "What happened to Boris only reinforced the case for greater parliamentary scrutiny of new rules. He can't figure out the rules because they have no logic. & # 39;

Liverpool are "only a few days" away from the breaker shutting down

Liverpool are said to be just days away from the first city to have a circuit breaker locked for two weeks as cases continue to rise.

Liverpool Mayor Joe Anderson said it was "only a matter of time" before extensive lockdown measures were put in place in the northwestern city.

He has also backed calls for a complete ban on selling alcohol after 9 p.m. – to prevent bar-goers from flocking to supermarkets after the 10 p.m. curfew and running out of licenses.

Mr Anderson said locking down the short circuit switch, which could include closing pubs and restaurants for two weeks, could help restore "normalcy" to "normal" in the run-up to Christmas.

Speaking to The Daily Telegraph, he said, “For me it is only a matter of time as the virus cannot be controlled in the city with the restrictions we have now.

"If we can take the toughest lockdown measures now, we can stop the increase and wind it down by the end of October so we can get back to normal before Christmas."

Mr Johnson rushed to disarm the series via his undercover statement of the lockdown within hours and rarely apologized.

"Sorry, I misspelled it today," he wrote.

“In the Northeast, new rules mean you can't meet people from different households in indoor social settings, including pubs, restaurants, and at home.

“You should also avoid coming into contact with other households outside.

& # 39; This is important in order to control the spread of the coronavirus and keep everyone safe. If you are in a high risk area, please continue to follow guidelines from local authorities. & # 39;

Mr Johnson could face another difficult day as he will address the nation at a press conference with medical and science chiefs Chris Whitty and Patrick Vallance.

It could provide a new avenue for both Mr Johnson's and the critics of the Scientists in the face of anger over the direction of the coronavirus pandemic.

While the Prime Minister has defended his advice and expertise, which has resulted in local bans and early pub closings, Tory MPs have laid their anger on the couple for the past few days, calling for them to be fired.

The government's use of the full powers granted by parliament at the start of the coronavirus crisis has fueled growing discontent among Tories.

The Coronavirus Act 2020, which together with the Health Protection Act of 1984 underpins the lockdown, must be renewed every six months. The vote is due tomorrow.

But ministers have tried to come to an agreement with Sir Graham's rebel gang after threatening to derail the process. The government is now expected to undertake to hold votes where practicable before further restrictions are imposed.

Cabinet sources told MailOnline they believe a compromise is about to be finalized.

Former minister Sir Desmond Swayne warned this morning that some MPs could vote against the renewal of the coronavirus law unless deep concessions are made.

He accused ministers of governing through Fiat and told BBC Radio 4's Today program: "If the amendment is not voted on and the government does not respond satisfactorily to the amendment's demands, many people will vote. " against a renewal of an act.

"Well, if I say a lot, there will be a number, but the government will certainly not be defeated."

Health Secretary Matt Hancock announced the concessions in the House of Representatives and said the government would consult parliament on any restrictions across England or the UK. A vote would take place in advance wherever possible.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock announced the concessions in the House of Representatives and said the government would consult parliament on any restrictions across England or the UK. A vote would take place in advance wherever possible.

Matt Hancock and Michael Gove today

Chief Whip Mark Spencer

Matt Hancock and Michael Gove (pictured left) were in the cabinet today, as was chief whip Mark Spencer (right) who tried to broker a deal with Tory rebels

Ex-No10 advisor calls on PM to get scientists out of the way

Boris Johnson should stop relying on scientists and take responsibility for decisions, said a former No. 10 advisor.

James Frayne, who ran focus groups and polls for the cabinet office but has now quit, called when he criticized the government's performance.

In an article on ConservativeHome.com, Frayne said "PR Advice 101" is "rooting out the independent experts trusted by the public and downplaying the role of politicians."

"So we've only seen government scientists for months," he said.

& # 39; There are two problems with this approach. First, this has implied that the scientists are ultimately in control of the situation and that there are simple empirical decisions that can and must be made.

& # 39; This is not true and has given the public a false sense of security.

Second, most scientists are bad communicators. The media loves the idea of ​​the boring, trustworthy scientist that the public all loves. But that is not the reality.

"Scientists are not professional communicators and it is a mistake to put them in positions of public influence in this way."

He continued, "The government needs to show some balls and demote the role of scientists as communicators and take responsibility for what are essentially political decisions."

Senior Tory Steve Baker has compared some of the government's coronavirus restrictions to George Orwell's dystopian novel 1984, specifically pointing out a ban on singing and dancing in bars, cafes and restaurants.

The prime minister is also under increasing pressure from hard-hit hotel managers to call for a constant 10 p.m. curfew review.

More than 100 of the UK's largest restaurant chains, including Wetherspoon and Pizza Hut, wrote to Mr Johnson asking for a three-week review – and that it should be deleted if it can't handle the steep rise in cases.

Mr Johnson appealed to MPs to renew powers in the Coronavirus Act, saying the nation remains in "a grave situation".

“Nobody wants to do things like that. Nobody in their right mind wants to stop people from singing and dancing in pubs or from having fun in the normal way, ”he told the press conference.

"I appreciate the (Orwell) characterization, but if we all work together and solve this problem, get rid of this virus, we can move on with our strategy of keeping education open, keeping the economy moving and how I work for the day. Let's say if I believe that these medico-scientific improvements will really bring the long-term liberation that we need.

“And to deliver it, we all have to work together and follow instructions. I say this with respect to my colleagues in Parliament and I know that they will have the opportunity to speak on these issues, to discuss them properly and to discuss them as parliamentarians should. & # 39;

He also reiterated his commitment to more regular coronavirus debates in the House of Commons, pledging MPs to consult the government's scientific advisors more regularly.

However, after the Prime Minister's plea, further pressure came from the high-level group of MPs on the Liaison Committee, which Mr Johnson is allowed to question in the House of Commons.

Senior Tory MP Sir Bernard Jenkin wrote to Mr Johnson as committee chairman saying that "a majority of us" supported Parliament's vote before or immediately after the restrictions went into effect.

"The idea that such restrictions can be applied without the express consent of Parliament, except in urgent cases, is not universally acceptable and can indeed be challenged by law," said Sir Bernard.

Measures have been tightened in Northumberland, Newcastle, North and South Tyneside, Gateshead, Sunderland and County Durham.

Aiming to stop a coronavirus resurgence, the health ministry said laws would prohibit indoor mixing between households, including pubs and restaurants.

However, the question remained whether the measures to be enforced with fines would include meeting people from other homes outside of the hospitality industry.

When asked yesterday on BBC Radio 4's Today program, Ms. Keegan said, “I'm sorry I can't sort this out.

"I don't know the answer to that question, but I'm sure you can find out the answer to this question."

Urged when asked how to keep people informed of the latest restrictions when even ministers cannot, she said, “I'm sorry I can't answer this question. I am sure there are a lot of people who could. I do not represent the northeast. & # 39;

Tory unrest over new rules, regulations and fines also increased after it was discovered that authorities will have the power to use "reasonable force" to isolate the people themselves.

New laws published by the government say that "reasonable force" can be used if someone refuses to obey an order to stay home after a positive coronavirus test or if they come into contact with another person, who suffers from the disease.

The authority will be available to all "authorized persons" in reports, which could include so-called "Covid Marshalls", as well as police and council officials.

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