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Boris Johnson urges people to go back to offices in cities


Boris Johnson will tell office workers next week to return to their desks to save the UK economy.

The Prime Minister will use a virus strategy update to urge employers to send their employees back to work, if it is safe.

He and Chancellor Rishi Sunak are appalled by the impact empty offices have on shops and restaurants in the city center – and fear that widespread homework will affect Britain's productivity.

Government sources say Mr. Johnson told Whitehall's bosses this week to set an example by starting to bring officials back to their desks. At a conference call with 200 senior officials, he said it was "more efficient and productive" than working from home.

He added: “Now we ask elementary school children to come back now that we are opening shops and coming back to pubs. I think it is time for the major UK government departments to come back to the office if we can do it in a Covid-safe way.

“I know there are logistical difficulties, but we have to go back to our desks if we can. I hope, according to Vera Lynn's words, we'll see each other again and bring everyone back together. "

He also asked business and city leaders, including Goldman Sachs chief Richard Gnodde, to call more staff back to the base.

Mr Johnson highlighted the new strategy in a public question and answer session yesterday. He said people should "go to work now if you can," adding, "I want more people to feel safe using the shops, restaurants, and restaurants." Get back to work – but only if we all follow the instructions.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson wears a face mask in his Uxbridge constituency. The Prime Minister will use a virus strategy update to urge employers to send their employees back to work, if it is safe

"The faster we can get back to the status quo, the better."

The Prime Minister has asked officials for a “Roadmap 2” to return to a more normal life, with a nine-month schedule to abolish most of the rules on social distance. He argues with government scientists about how to do it safely.

Chains let down without a lunch break

Business leaders yesterday asked ministers to clarify when millions of employees can return to their offices.

They claim that working from home is hurting the economy as retailers such as Pret A Manger and Upper Crust cut thousands of jobs after the absence of employees who bought food during lunch breaks resulted in losses.

Boots also said visitor numbers had "dropped dramatically" as plans to cut 4,000 jobs were announced.

Recruitment firm Reed Reed, James Reed, said retailers have become "collateral damage," adding, "Businesses need more clarity about when workers can return to offices."

Shobi Khan, general manager of London's Canary Wharf Group, said: "There is no problem going to Spain, Italy or France, but heaven forbids you to go to the office."

Edwin Morgan of the Institute of Directors said: “Offices play a key role in the surrounding economy. Companies in the city center, especially in the food and hospitality sector, rely heavily on commuter habits. "

He is particularly concerned about the impact of homework in London, whose normally dynamic economy is driving Britain. A high-level source said, "It doesn't matter how much Rishi Sunak spends on incentives and subsidies to help restaurants and shops when their customers are at home."

Many banks and companies have told their employees that they are likely to work from home by September or even by the end of the year, leaving the business areas.

As a result, retailers such as Boots, Pret A Manger, Upper Crust and TM Lewin are cutting thousands of jobs. James Reed, head of recruiting firm Reed, said: "It is clear that reopening offices would have a positive impact on the economy and bring a lot of life back to the cities."

Government offices have been deserted since early March. In the Ministry of Education, for example, only 20 out of 6,500 employees are regularly in the office. Mr. Johnson said he wanted to avoid a second surge through test and trace and local locks, but wanted to avoid a new national lock at all costs. "I want to go back to a world where people can shake hands again," he added.

His message suggests that Prime Minister Health Minister Matt Hancock overturned, being careful to loosen the ban.

In a web chat with a group of women yesterday, he said that working from home has become the “new norm” and suggested giving people a new right to request it. He said there is a big argument that home work has increased productivity. Whitehall sources said the prime minister disagreed.

However, the advisors later suggested that Mr. Hancock had spoken about existing rules that give people the right to request flexible work.

On Friday, Mr. Johnson asked the British to get back to work – in a departure from the government's work from home if you can.

The Prime Minister suggested that people should return to the office if it is "safe" since he was holding an online Q&A session with members of the public.

The comments appear to mark a significant change in the ministerial message as concerns about a bloodbath of jobs on the main street increase. This week alone, 60,000 people are facing the ax because the economy will be affected by the blockade.

Cafes and cafes have reduced their workforce as demand has dried up in many cities. Many still work from home instead of going to the office.

Boris Johnson is wearing a face mask in his Uxbridge constituency today

Boris Johnson is wearing a face mask in his Uxbridge constituency today

The Prime Minister suggested that people should return to the office if it is "safe" since he was holding an online Q&A session with members of the public today

The Prime Minister suggested that people should return to the office if it is "safe" since he was holding an online Q&A session with members of the public today

Government concerns now seem to be shifting to the country's economic health, with fears that 1980s-style unemployment will make a comeback if normal consumer behavior is not resumed. Forecasts now expect the UK unemployment rate to exceed 10 percent by the end of the year.

Although the prime minister has consistently stated that his government "follows science" with regard to coronavirus policy, it is not yet clear whether the chief medical officer, Professor Chris Whitty and Sir Patrick Vallance, the chief scientific adviser and Sage chairman, have agreed to change the message.

Despite Mr. Johnson's comments today, the official guidelines remain the same, and those who can work from home should continue to do so, a Downing Street spokesman told MailOnline.

There are concerns that many employees will not be able to return, even if they want to, because of the lack of physical space in the offices due to the rules of social detachment, and public transport is underutilized.

Mr. Johnson said today, “I want people to work again as carefully as possible. It is very important that people work again when they can. & # 39;

The Prime Minister moved as follows:

  • The R rate in south-west England could have been over one now, with government scientists admitting that the Midlands is now the only region where it is definitely below the central number. Across the country, it is estimated to be between 0.7 and 0.9;
  • Britain has only recorded 48 more deaths from Covid-19, bringing the official number to 44,650. This means that the average daily death rate has dropped to 74 – the lowest since March 24 and a 28 percent drop in a week
  • Chancellor Rishi Sunak unveiled another major rescue package to plc in the UK this week, urging people to spend money on businesses crippled by coronavirus efforts
  • Almost 60,000 workers are laid off after a number of companies pressed the layoff trigger less than a day after the Chancellor delivered a £ 30bn package to keep people from working
  • The owners of Wagamama and Frankie & Benny & # 39; s said that one in ten of its restaurants will not reopen before the end of the year. After Boots, John Lewis, Rolls Royce, and Burger, it is the youngest company to announce that it is having problems due to the coronavirus crisis this week King
Sir Patrick Vallance

Professor Chris Whitty

Although the prime minister has consistently said that his government "follows science" in coronavirus policy, it is not yet clear whether the chief medical officer is Professor Chris Whitty (right) and Sir Patrick Vallance (left), the chief scientific Adviser and Sage Chairperson have approved the change to the message

Tesco SCRAPS disposable systems on aisle floors and increases the number of customers who are approved in stores

Tesco has scrapped one-way systems on aisle floors as the supermarket relaxes restrictions on social distance.

The supermarket announced plans to increase the number of customers allowed in stores, but continues to urge buyers to stay two meters apart.

Supermarkets across the UK had to implement rules to ensure customer safety when the Coronavirus lock was first introduced in March.

The government's drive to open more stores last Saturday has allowed Tesco to cut queues outside by introducing more customers inside.

Tesco, which has around 3,700 stores in the UK, worked with other supermarkets to enforce one-way queues and a new one-in-one-out entry plan in March.

Other supermarkets, including Aldi, introduced a traffic light system at the entrances to keep the two meters long social distance.

Tesco said it will monitor how many customers are visiting now. The measures have been relaxed, but some stores are now letting more people in at the same time.

The number of customers allowed in each branch is determined by the branch managers and therefore differs from country to country.

In his remarks today, the Prime Minister said: "I think everyone has taken their stay at home if they can. I think we should now say:" Go back to work if you can. ". Because I think it is very important that people try to live their lives more normally.

"I want more people to feel safe using the shops, using the restaurants, and getting back to work – but only if we all follow the instructions."

Mr. Johnson also hinted that facial covering in shops will be mandatory to calm nervous customers.

He admitted that "the balance of scientific opinion seemed to have shifted" how effective temporary masks can be.

"I think we need to insist that people in tight spaces where they meet people they don't normally meet wear facewear," said Johnson.

"We are looking for ways to ensure that people actually have face covers, for example in stores where there is a risk of transmission."

The postponement came after the blockade in England had been loosened considerably since last Saturday. Pubs and restaurants can be opened as long as the precautions for "Covid Secure" have been taken.

However, the Prime Minister's advice to British employees to work from home wherever possible seemed to be still valid.

In response to the Prime Minister's new advice, Usdaw's Secretary General of the Shopkeeper Union, Paddy Lillis, told MailOnline: “The Covid 19 pandemic is still very widespread, and Usdaw urges the government with caution to proceed and follow science.

"Unlocking must be done at a pace that ensures that there is no second increase in infections." Usdaw has not required mandatory facewear, but now that it's been introduced in Scotland, we're going to monitor how it works.

“We welcome everything that helps ensure the safety of customers and shop workers. However, the most important measure is to maintain adequate social distance and hygiene.

Many grocery and beverage retailers have been hard hit by the fact that millions of Britons worked from home during the coronavirus crisis. Pictured at Marylebone station in London

Many grocery and beverage retailers have been hard hit by the fact that millions of Britons worked from home during the coronavirus crisis. Pictured at Marylebone station in London

Around 4,000 jobs are to be created at Boots, 48 ​​of the optician shops are expected to be closed

Around 4,000 jobs are to be created at Boots, 48 ​​of the optician shops are expected to be closed

"For this reason, Usdaw is asking employers to stay within the established two-meter distance, continue to use screens at checkouts, and limit the number of buyers who are in business at the same time."

"We also want to make it clear that store workers should never be forced to wear facewear. They are already more abusive than normal and this could be another focus."

How many jobs are at risk in the UK?

  • Accenture – 900
  • Airbus – 1,700
  • Arcadia – 500
  • BA – 12,000
  • Beales – 1,052
  • Bentley – 1,000
  • Burger King – 1,600
  • Casual Dining Group (Bella Italia, Cafe Rouge and Las Iguanas) – 1,900
  • DHL at Jaguar Land Rover – 2,200
  • EasyJet – 4,500
  • Go outdoors – 2,400
  • Harrods – 700
  • Harveys – 240
  • Left – 350
  • Maternity care – 2,500
  • Oasis Warehouse – 1,800
  • P&O Ferries – 1,100
  • Pret a Manger – 1,330
  • Ryanair – 3,000
  • SSP group (Upper Crust, Caffe Ritazza) – 5,000
  • Ted Baker – 160
  • TM Lewin – 600
  • Tui – 8,000
  • Victoria's Secret – 800 Endangered

As evidence of the problems on the main street, pharmacies insisted that they need £ 370 million in loans for PSA and other coronavirus measures approved by the government.

National Pharmacy Association chairman Andrew Lane said: “There are many pharmacies across the country that are financially marginalized and crippled by the added cost of COVID19. When they close, the towns and villages they serve lose a popular and life-saving commodity.

“If the government is serious about stopping the slow death of the main street, it must act now and use its money where its mouth is.

"The government has managed to find more than a billion pounds for the arts sector, but is fluctuating at the forefront of financial support for health workers."

The owners of Wagamama and Frankie & Benny & # 39; s said earlier today that one in ten of its restaurants will not reopen before the end of the year.

The restaurant group said that stores – mostly at airports – won't open until next year at the earliest, as they're unlikely to attract enough customers to make it worthwhile.

Those affected are in areas "in which the number of visitors is likely to remain significantly weak," the company said on Friday in an update for the shareholders.

There is concern about the jobs of those working at the locations as the government vacation program, which covers salaries, ends in October.

After Boots, John Lewis, Rolls Royce, and Burger King this week, it is the youngest company to announce that it is struggling with the corona virus crisis.

The news is another blow to Rishi Sunak's struggle to maintain the British job, as nearly 60,000 workers have been laid off.

A number of companies squeezed less than a day after the Chancellor delivered a £ 30 billion package to keep people from working.

The restaurant group, which owns Wagamama (in the picture the Chancellor at a central location in London yesterday), said that the stores - mostly at airports - will not open until next year at the earliest

The restaurant group, which owns Wagamama (in the picture the Chancellor at a central location in London yesterday), said that the stores – mostly at airports – will not open until next year at the earliest

The restaurant group did not immediately respond to what would happen to its employees.

All stores that will reopen this year will serve their customers in late September, the company said.

By now, 60 percent of locations that open before the end of August can use the government's Eat Out to Help Out program, which gives guests up to 50 percent off their meals on the first three days of the week.

Every fourth restaurant and pub in the restaurant group will be open at the end of this month.

It said to investors: & # 39; The group has now gradually reopened its restaurants and pubs for restaurant trade in accordance with government guidelines.

& # 39; We are very happy to welcome our customers and colleagues again to ensure that their safety comes first and at the same time remains a pleasant experience.

"The group's diversified portfolio allows each business area to uniquely adapt to the challenges of social distancing while keeping the customer at the center of every decision."

The news comes at a turbulent time for the company. Last month it was announced that 125 Frankie & Benny locations would be permanently closed and 3,000 jobs pending.

Around 400 restaurants and pubs remain after the restructuring. The company's board of directors cut their salaries by 40 percent in early April when they claimed government vacation pay.

On Friday, they increased their pay, but will still need 20 percent less than normal until all employees are supported by the government.

Who is this masked man Boris Johnson appears in a face covering for the first time after hinting that they will be mandatory in stores

  • Boris Johnson was first seen in public with a face covering
  • It comes after PM suggested masks could be made mandatory in shops in England
  • Nicola Sturgeon has made coverage in shops in Scotland mandatory
  • According to a survey for MailOnline, 61 percent of the population in England want to follow this example

Boris Johnson was first seen with a face mask today after hinting that coverings in shops in England would be mandatory.

The Prime Minister was spotted hanging up in his constituency in Uxbridge this afternoon when he greeted the shopkeepers.

The UK government is currently recommending measures such as a face cover when people are not allowed to be two meters apart indoors.

Unlike Scotland, where coverage is now mandatory in stores, public transport is the only place where it's required. A survey for MailOnline showed that 61 percent of the public would like to follow the example north of the border on this issue.

During an online Q&A session with members of the public, the Prime Minister admitted that the balance of scientific opinion has apparently shifted into how effective masks can be.

"I think we need to insist that people in tight spaces where they meet people they don't normally meet wear facewear," said Johnson.

Boris Johnson was first shown in public in his Uxbridge constituency in public with a face mask

Boris Johnson was first shown in public in his Uxbridge constituency in public with a face mask

The prime minister was wearing a conservative blue mask when he met shopkeepers in his constituency

The prime minister was wearing a conservative blue mask when he met shopkeepers in his constituency

It comes after he indicated that salaries in shops in England would be mandatory

It comes after he indicated that salaries in shops in England would be mandatory

A survey by Redfield & Wilton Strategies for MailOnline found that 61 percent of the population in England wanted coverage to be enforced in shops and supermarkets - only 26 percent opposed it. The support is reflected across the UK

A survey by Redfield & Wilton Strategies for MailOnline found that 61 percent of the population in England wanted coverage to be enforced in shops and supermarkets – only 26 percent opposed it. The support is reflected across the UK

"We are looking for ways to ensure that people actually have face covers, for example in stores where there is a risk of transmission."

Earlier, Mr. Johnson had questions about why he hadn't been seen in public before wearing one.

In contrast, Nicola Sturgeon appeared in public with a tartan model and trolled Mr. Johnson by retweeting an article asking why Westminster politicians don't wear them.

A survey by Redfield & Wilton Strategies for MailOnline found that 61 percent of the population in England wanted coverage to be enforced in shops and supermarkets – only 26 percent opposed it. And new figures from the National Statistics Office today indicate that half of the adults are already routinely attracting them.

Health Minister Matt Hancock was seen wearing a mask while visiting a hospital, while Culture Minister Oliver Dowden also wore one this week when he visited a gallery.

But even though he revealed that he has a Florence Nightingale mask, the Prime Minister has not been seen wearing it.

Chancellor Rishi Sunak faced a backlash yesterday after imagining serving customers face-to-face food on a Wagamamas in London.

The prime minister seemed in high spirits as he posed for selfies with members of the public

The prime minister seemed in high spirits as he posed for selfies with members of the public

The Prime Minister visited a number of companies in his constituency after the block was loosened

The Prime Minister visited a number of companies in his constituency after the block was loosened

During an online Q&A session with members of the public, the prime minister admitted that the balance of scientific opinions has apparently shifted as to how effective they can be

During an online Q&A session with members of the public, the prime minister admitted that the balance of scientific opinions has apparently shifted as to how effective they can be

London Mayor Sadiq Khan said in writing to the Prime Minister that he was "disappointed and frustrated" that the government had not said that masks must be worn in "busy and closed public places".

The Labor politician added: “Face coverings are not only critical to public health. "They could play an increasing role in supporting public confidence and our economic recovery."

When asked whether such a gesture conforms to the rules of social distancing, the Prime Minister's spokesman said: “The instructions are clear that you should stay two meters apart where you can. "If this is not possible, it is one meter plus limit of damage, and this limit of damage was set in the guidelines."

In an interview round this morning, Minister of Culture Caroline Dinenage said she was wearing a mask "all the time" when the government came under pressure to respond to why more high-profile personalities had not been covered with faces.

When asked if she had been wearing a blanket since the coronavirus pandemic started, Ms. Dinenage said she regularly wears her son's face masks and posted a picture of herself on social media.

To indicate that face masks have been mandatory for public transportation in the past month, the Tory MP tweeted a picture of herself while wearing a fabric cover on June 5.

Ms. Dinenage told BBC Radio 4's Today show, "I wear mine all the time.

Nicola Stör

Boris Johnson

Nicola Sturgeon (left) trolled Boris Johnson (right) by retweeting an article asking why Westminster politicians weren't wearing facewear in public

“I have a fashion design student as a son who has booted me up a few times on his sewing machine and I wear them all the time.

"Many of us wear them in everyday life."

Ms. Dinenage said, "You should ask the Prime Minister and the Chancellor" when asked why none of the senior ministers had been photographed with a blanket in public.

She said that "many of my colleagues" had made it their business to wear a face mask, adding: "If the scientific evidence shows that this (the mask guide) is definitely something that needs to be changed, then we naturally do it. "

When asked whether the government was considering introducing a similar regime for Scotland in England, Ms. Dinenage told the BBC: “Yes, of course, and they are mandatory for public transport.

Chancellor Rishi Sunak faced a backlash yesterday after imagining serving customers face-to-face food on a Wagamamas in London

Chancellor Rishi Sunak faced a backlash yesterday after imagining serving customers face-to-face food on a Wagamamas in London

EU negotiator Michel Barnier wore a mask when he came downing Street this week - unlike the Prime Minister and Chancellor

EU negotiator Michel Barnier wore a mask when he came downing Street this week – unlike the Prime Minister and Chancellor

“We did say, however, that face coverings are recommended in enclosed spaces, but people can do it at their own discretion – but we will of course continue to review this.

"This is a topic that scientists tend to have different opinions about, so we look at it when new scientific studies emerge."

The ONS survey was conducted between July 2nd and 5th. Fifty-two percent of the public said they wore facial clothing the previous week – up from 43 percent the previous week.

The President of the Royal Society recommended this week that everyone in public should wear face covering to reduce the risk of a second wave of Covid-19 infections.

Professor Venki Ramakrishna said people should wear a mask when they leave the house, especially indoors, but admitted that the public remains "skeptical" about the benefits.

People will no longer obey the lock: SAGE files show that scientists have warned the UK government to prepare for "visible resistance" to future rule changes, and a THIRD public still doesn't know the symptoms of Covid-19

  • Behavioral experts warn of "different reactions" to future blocking measures
  • People are no longer so afraid of the corona virus and disagree with the government
  • Tired of distancing themselves socially, young people start to stop
  • Other papers showed that public toilets are seen as a particular risk of transmission
  • The virus can spread from person to person over 10 meters, but is unlikely

The government has been warned to prepare for "visible resistance" if it should ever attempt to introduce another blockage to combat the corona virus in the future, official council documents revealed today.

Newly released files from the Scientific Advisory Group on Emergency (SAGE) number 10 show that top behavioral researchers fear that people will not follow the draconian rules a second time.

They warned young people to distance themselves socially and give up the rules, while disagreements over Britain's approach to Covid-19 mean that the public is less likely to follow advice in the future.

Public confidence in the government, which has been heavily criticized for the worst death toll in Europe, has declined since the pandemic began, and people are no longer as afraid of the virus, the newspapers warned.

The same document revealed that an astonishing 35 percent of people – more than a third – still don't know that cough and fever are the two telltale symptoms of Covid-19.

Another paper revealed that scientists consider public toilets to be one of the areas most at risk of catching the corona virus. They say that using them is more risky than touching door handles in public or using ATMs.

And although within two meters (6'7 ") of someone is at greatest risk of becoming infected with the virus, there is still a risk that it will be transmitted if someone is 10m (32 '') removed, says a report.

A third piece of advice says that measuring the reproductive rate of the virus – the R – after the outbreak has shrunk and definitely not at the regional level will no longer make sense.

The results of today's SAGE articles include:

  • Behavioral scientists warned against trying to reinstate locking rules after they were lifted "could cause different reactions" because people disagree about whether they are necessary;
  • Many people lack a basic understanding of Covid-19, and only 65 percent can identify the main symptoms, the researchers said. They added that people & # 39; cmerged by rapidly changing government Instructions and do not fully understand the reasons for this ";
  • The corona virus may spread between people who are 10 meters apart. However, the highest risk is that people are within 2 meters of each other.
  • A large study of 64,066 Covid-19 hospitalized patients in the UK found that 28 percent of them died. Patients spent an average of nine days in the hospital, and 16 percent required high flow oxygen treatment.
  • Regional R-rate comparisons are not an accurate way to measure where hotspots are, and the national rate is only vague when the number of cases has decreased.
The government has been warned that it could face "visible resistance" to further blocking measures and that people are not as afraid of Covid-19 as they were in March (Image: Prime Minister Boris Johnson at the press conference on Downing Street on July 3 )

The government has been warned that it could face "visible resistance" to further blocking measures and that people are not as afraid of Covid-19 as they were in March (Image: Prime Minister Boris Johnson at the press conference on Downing Street on July 3 )

Officials may have difficulty reintroducing blocking measures

One of the most important reports in today's paper, which is now published weekly as part of a transparency campaign, comes from the SPI-B group, which reports to SAGE.

SPI-B, the scientific pandemic influenza group for behavior, advises the government on human behavior and problems that it may face when dealing with people.

The June report entitled "Consensus on the reintroduction of measures and their impact on the infection rate" states: "From a behavioral point of view, the reintroduction of measures can cause various reactions from the population – silent compliance, critical compliance or visible resistance (e.g. from marginalized groups, young people).

“Politics and communication have to consider these different forms of reaction in order to be successful.

“There are several factors to consider when deciding what measures to implement and how to implement them. These apply equally at national and local levels. "

The scientists first said that many people would likely change their behavior without being forced to do so if they were told they were at risk of infection.

They said these were gradual rather than sudden changes, and enforcement might be needed to speed them up.

The main concern they raised was that the “psychological context” of future bans will be different than in March, when the country was exposed to the unknown and thousands of people fell ill with the disease every day.

The SPI-B report said: "Disagreements about the appropriate response to the pandemic are likely to complicate any attempt to reintroduce restrictions."

And it added: & # 39; Resistance to social distancing measures has increased in recent weeks …

This is particularly pronounced in certain populations and communities that have borne the brunt of the closure but are in some cases less at risk, e.g. younger.

"However, the drivers of resistance overcome generation inequality and structure and express a hierarchy of priorities that Covid addresses other issues such as the right to social interaction (free parties) and the right to protest (e.g. Black Lives Matter) leads back. "

Experts say young people are tired of distancing themselves socially and giving up the rules, while disagreements over the British approach to Covid-19 make the public less likely to follow advice in the future (Image: Social Distance went out of window 4 on Super Saturday in July when huge crowds formed in Soho, London)

Experts say young people are tired of distancing themselves socially and giving up the rules, while disagreements over the British approach to Covid-19 make the public less likely to follow advice in the future (Image: Social Distance went out of window 4 on Super Saturday in July when huge crowds formed in Soho, London)

Many people lack a basic understanding of Covid-19.

Although the corona virus has dominated public life for the past four months, behavioral scientists say that many people still lack a basic understanding of the virus.

According to a study by King’s College London, SPI-B warned that only 65 percent of people can correctly identify cough and fever as the main symptoms of Covid-19.

Parties and swarms are "exactly what we don't want to see," says CHEF MEDIC

Dr. Government chief England doctor Jenny Harries said earlier this week that she was concerned that parties and raves would take place across the country.

The relaxation of the blocking rules has resulted in photos and videos of hundreds of young people drinking and partying in cities across the UK.

Dr. Harries said that everyone must continue to follow the coronavirus' advice on washing and socializing and sticking to social distancing.

"The virus is still out there, looking for more people to get infected, and we need to prevent it from getting under control," she said.

Dr. Jenny Harries this morning this week

Dr. Jenny Harries this morning this week

The chief doctor told ITVs This Morning that she was "very, very concerned" about the second wave of the virus, adding, "I don't want to label young people because that would be very unfair, but actually if you don't have friends who have become very sick, for example, it may not have registered as much as this virus can be dangerous, and young people are definitely not as badly affected.

“As a doctor in public health, I'm worried about raves. We do not want to do that.

“The mortality rate is definitely falling, but we've seen the first peak effectively and we want to prevent a second one.

“Since the weather is easy for us, it is very likely that summer will go a little in our favor.

“In warmer weather, especially when people are outdoors a lot more – which is much safer – we are unlikely to see you.

“But I think I and my colleagues are very, very concerned about looking for a possible second high point as we approach autumn.

"And of course that's the same time that people experience other symptoms that could confuse people, so the flu symptoms obviously vary, as our hospitals get busier."

This could affect the likelihood that infected people will be tested for the virus, and possibly that people will not isolate themselves if they should.

The report said: "Many people are confused by the rapidly changing government guidelines and do not fully understand the reasons for this. This makes them less likely to be intrinsically motivated to perform effective infection control and to have sufficient knowledge. "

The virus could spread 10 meters through the air, and public toilets are a medium risk

A paper submitted to SAGE on June 12 by the SARS-CoV-2 Broadcasting Expert Group (TWEG) highlighted the most likely types of coronavirus spread.

The report claimed that the greatest risk for people is within 2 meters (6 & # 39; 7 ") of other people who may be suffering from the disease – without considering social distance.

It is possible that droplets carrying the virus could pass 10 m (32)) through the air.

They decided that the risk was "very low", but were unsure about the quality of the evidence supporting this.

The use of public toilets, meanwhile, posed a “medium” risk for the likelihood of people getting Covid-19.

The TWEG report rated the risk higher than touching door handles or ATMs in public places and also higher than swimming in public.

It states: “Public toilets represent a potential SARS-CoV-2 exposure point for several reasons.

Above all, this includes that they contain many contact surfaces that could be contaminated with infectious nasopharyngeal (neck) fluids or faeces and to which many people are exposed in a short time.

“Toilets are also the point where the amount of infectious virus in the wastewater could be greatest. The risk of transmission of aerosols, faeces / eyes and faeces / orals has been assumed due to the presence of viruses and there are indications of previous SARS-CoV outbreaks.

"In addition, toilets can be a point of contact in the community where the transfer between users can take place through the transfer of droplets face to face, in the toilet building itself and nearby."

More than a quarter of British hospitalized Covid-19 patients die

A study of 64,066 hospitalized patients with Covid-19 in the UK found that 28 percent of them – more than one in four – die from the disease.

The deaths were higher in ICU people, 35 percent of whom had succumbed to the disease, and even higher in people who needed ventilation – 42 percent.

The COVID-19 Clinical Information Network (CO-CIN), made up of university professionals from across the UK, presented the results from June 22 SAGE.

The study found that people spend an average of nine days in the hospital if they are ingested with coronavirus or caught in a ward.

About 16 percent of patients require high flow oxygen therapy to be able to breathe.

The most common symptoms in hospitalized patients are cough (63 percent), fever (62 percent), and shortness of breath (61 percent) – but a worrying one in 16 people (6 percent) said they had no symptoms. Overall, the study found.

Cough, fever and shortness of breath are the most common symptoms in Covid 19 patients hospitalized in the UK. According to a study of more than 50,000 people, a worrying six percent had no symptoms at all

Cough, fever and shortness of breath are the most common symptoms in Covid 19 patients hospitalized in the UK. According to a study of more than 50,000 people, a worrying six percent had no symptoms at all

Measuring the R rate is no longer a useful measure – especially not at the regional level

Eine andere Gruppe, die SAGE berät, SPI-M-O, hat am 12. Juni Vorbehalte gegen ihre Schätzungen des R-Werts des Coronavirus in Großbritannien ausgesprochen.

SPI-M-O ist die wissenschaftliche Pandemie-Influenza-Gruppe für Modellierung und Betrieb und berät die Regierung über den möglichen Verlauf des Ausbruchs.

Bei der Schätzung des R-Werts – der Reproduktionsrate des Coronavirus – wurde darauf hingewiesen, dass die Zahlen nicht nützlich sind, wenn nur wenige Personen positiv testen.

Die R-Rate liegt derzeit für das gesamte Vereinigte Königreich zwischen 0,7 und 0,9, was bedeutet, dass alle 10 infizierten Personen das Virus im Durchschnitt an sieben bis neun andere Personen weitergeben.

SPI-M-O warnte jedoch: „Schätzungen von R sind weniger zuverlässig und weniger nützlich, um den Zustand der Epidemie zu bestimmen, wenn die Fälle abnehmen. Dafür gibt es drei Hauptgründe:

Erstens ist es in wenigen Fällen unmöglich, R genau abzuschätzen, und es liegen breite Konfidenzintervalle vor, die wahrscheinlich 1 umfassen. Dies bedeutet nicht unbedingt, dass die Epidemie zunimmt, sondern könnte das Ergebnis einer größeren Unsicherheit sein.

Zweitens tendiert R mit abnehmender Inzidenz zu 1 und muss in Verbindung mit der Inzidenz bewertet werden. Die politischen Auswirkungen von R = 1 bei 1.000 Neuinfektionen pro Tag unterscheiden sich stark von denen bei 100.000 Neuinfektionen pro Tag.

'Schließlich ist R ein durchschnittliches Maß. Wenn die Inzidenz gering ist, kann ein Ausbruch an einer Stelle dazu führen, dass Schätzungen von R für die gesamte Region höher als 1 werden. Umgekehrt werden kleine lokale Ausbrüche nicht erkannt. Schätzungen von R, die auf kleinen Zahlen basieren, erfassen Änderungen in dem Gebiet möglicherweise auch nicht schnell genug, um die Politik auf nützliche Weise zu informieren. & # 39;

Die Wissenschaftler sagten, sie seien von der Genauigkeit oder Nützlichkeit der Messung der Reproduktionsrate nicht überzeugt, dass sie nicht für politische Entscheidungen wie die Auferlegung regionaler Beschränkungen oder Sperren verwendet werden sollten.

Sie fügten hinzu: „Schätzungen von R auf regionaler Ebene unterliegen denselben Schwierigkeiten bei der Interpretation nationaler Schätzungen, werden jedoch aufgrund der geringeren Anzahl von Fällen verstärkt.

'Die Veröffentlichung einer großen Anzahl von Schätzungen erhöht die statistische Wahrscheinlichkeit, dass eine davon künstlich hoch ist. SPI-M-O ist nicht zuversichtlich, dass regionale R-Schätzungen ausreichend robust sind, um regionalpolitische Entscheidungen zu treffen. "

(tagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) Nachrichten (t) Downing Street (t) Nachrichten und Aktualisierungen der britischen Regierung zum britischen Kabinett (t) Boris Johnson (t) Nicola Sturgeon (t) Coronavirus