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Boris Johnson urges parents to send children to “safe” primary schools tomorrow


Boris Johnson today urged parents to send children back to elementary school – but refused to rule out a full shutdown to control the mutated strain of coronavirus.

The Prime Minister insisted that "there is no doubt in my head" that the schools are "safe" as he insisted there would be no further U-turn when most of the primaries reopen this week.

However, in a New Years interview on BBC broadcast Andrew Marr, it was suggested that there would be a more extensive shutdown. All he said was that everything would be "checked".

Mr Johnson has been asked to review the effects of the Tier 4 restrictions in the coming weeks to ensure that the secondaries are operational again on Jan. 18.

The prime minister also accepted that tougher measures were "likely" to be needed to contain the more contagious variant of the deadly virus, saying the situation was "bumpy".

When asked what else the government could do to stabilize the situation, Mr Johnson said, "There are obviously a number of tougher measures we should consider … school closings are one of those things."

He insisted that vaccines were the way to get Britain out of the crisis and said "tens of millions" would receive bumps in the next three months – although he refused to give specific numbers.

Mr Johnson also dismissed criticism that the government handled the pandemic poorly, saying "What we couldn't reasonably foresee was the arrival of the variant."

He added sharply, "The retrospectoscope is a great instrument."

The grim comments came in a growing dispute over education.

The head of the English school guard today warned that the students cannot be "on leave" as the left councils join the uprising against the government's plans to keep schools open.

In another world of today's coronavirus developments:

  • Officials who ran the UK vaccination program defended the decision to widen the gap between the two doses, insisting that this is "the way we save lives".
  • Last night's health bosses insisted that urgent cancer surgeries in London not be scrapped to ease the burden on hospitals flooded with Covid patients.
  • Jo Stevens, Labor secretary for shadow culture, is being treated in hospital for coronavirus, her staff said last night.
  • Another 57,725 had positive test results and recorded 445 deaths yesterday;
  • A consultant at London Children's Hospital beat up an "irresponsible" nurse who claimed in a BBC interview that her hospital had an "entire children's ward" with Covid.
  • Young women without voting rights are most likely to reject a Covid vaccine if it were available tomorrow. This was the result of the Find Out Now survey.

In a New Year's interview on BBC program Andrew Marr, Boris Johnson urged parents to send children back to elementary school – but declined to rule out a full shutdown to control the mutated coronavirus strain

The Prime Minister insisted that "there is no doubt in my head" that the schools are "safe" as he insisted there would be no further U-turn when most of the primaries reopen this week

The Prime Minister insisted that "there is no doubt in my head" that the schools are "safe" as he insisted there would be no further U-turn when most of the primaries reopen this week

This map shows how the coronavirus variants have been tracked on their worldwide distribution

This map shows how the coronavirus variants have been tracked on their worldwide distribution

According to the SAGE expert, harder Covid curbs are needed

It's "pretty clear" that tougher coronavirus curbs are needed, a SAGE leader warned today.

Professor Sir Mark Walport, a former government science adviser, suggested that Tier 4 would not be enough to accommodate the new mutant strain.

When asked if the highest bracket was sufficient, Sir Mark told the BBC's Andrew Marr Show, “It's the Tier 4 restrictions, they obey them.

“It's about breaking through essentially every possible transmission path we possibly can.

"Those are the things that are absolutely necessary and it is pretty clear that we will need more."

Ofsted's chief inspector Amanda Spielman said school closings should be kept to an "absolute minimum", revealing that the initial lockdown was affecting children's learning and further development.

As she wrote in the Sunday Telegraph, she said Ofsted had discovered that some younger children "forgot to hold a pencil or use a knife and fork and had regressed into simple language numbers".

Among older children, Ms. Spielman said the school guard had noted "an increase in eating disorders and self-harm, as well as anti-social behavior in some schools" during the coronavirus crisis.

Most primary schools in England are expected to open their doors tomorrow, while secondary schools will reopen in a staggered manner later this month and there are plans to test each student weekly.

But yesterday the UK's largest teachers union told its members that it was not safe to return to class and called for a transition to online classes.

School principals are now calling on the government to cancel GCSE and A-level exams this summer amid outrage over Education Secretary Gavin Williamson's plans to keep schools open.

When asked if he could guarantee the schools will open on Jan. 18, Mr Johnson said, "Well, of course we will continue to assess the impact of the Tier 4 measures, the Tier 3 measures."

When asked if GCSE and A-level exams should be canceled, the Prime Minister said, "We have to be realistic, we have to be realistic about how quickly this new variant has spread … we have to be realistic about the impact, that has it on our NHS … and we have to be humble in the face of this virus. & # 39;

Mr Johnson indicated that even stricter restrictions could be put in place and said the tiering system was "unfortunately likely to get tougher".

"We may have to do things over the next few weeks that will be more difficult in many parts of the country," he said.

"I am fully reconciled with it."

Mr Johnson declined to inquire about whether they could include a new Level 5 or curfew, but made it clear that school closings are on the table.

"There are obviously a number of tougher measures that we would have to consider," he said.

Health chiefs say some younger people will die from coronavirus

Health officials today warned that people aged 30 will die from Covid as NHS hospitals in the West Country prepare for an overflow of critically ill patients from London as part of emergency plans.

Trusts in London and the South East at the heart of the UK epidemic are preparing to transfer patients to hospitals in the South West, while patients in East England are being transferred to the Midlands.

The massive Nightingale Hospital in London's Excel Center, which was set up in record time at the start of the pandemic to be quickly mothballed, is set to reopen within 14 days, according to the Times.

National mating agreements have been made and hospitals across the UK should prepare for the same covid pressures as the NHS in, amid doctors' warnings that hospitals in the south have come under "immense pressure" due to an increase in cases of "mutated" Covid the capital.

Chris Hopson, executive director of NHS Providers, said only a small number of patients would be moved from London to the Southwest and the Midlands when space in neighboring hospitals was exhausted.

Dr. Alison Pittard, the dean of the department of intensive care medicine, hinted today that the NHS could collapse because "very, very tired staff" may not have the energy to deal with the tide of "mutated" virus cases.

On the BBC's Andrew Marr Show, she also claimed she had heard of cases of people aged 30 and over suffering from coronavirus in intensive care units, claiming that "younger people will die from Covid".

"I'm not going to speculate now about what they would be, but I'm sure all of our viewers and listeners will understand what kind of things … clearly school closings we had to do in March are one of those things. & # 39;

The sharp warning came when health officials warned people will die from Covid by the age of 30. The West Country NHS hospitals braced themselves for a flood of critically ill patients from London as part of contingency plans.

Trusts in London and the South East at the heart of the UK epidemic are preparing to transfer patients to hospitals in the South West, while patients in East England are being transferred to the Midlands.

The huge Nightingale Hospital in London's Excel Center, which was set up in record time at the beginning of the pandemic to be quickly mothballed, is expected to reopen within 14 days.

National mating agreements have been made and hospitals across the UK should prepare for the same covid pressures as the NHS in, amid doctors' warnings that hospitals in the south have come under "immense pressure" due to an increase in cases of "mutated" Covid the capital.

Chris Hopson, executive director of NHS Providers, said only a small number of patients would be moved from London to the Southwest and the Midlands when space in neighboring hospitals was exhausted.

He said: “Hospitals are doing an excellent job of providing additional capacity to treat the critically ill in London and the South East. When things get tougher we will find other ways to treat people in the area, but we know that there are some patients who can be taken where the pressure is a little less such as the Southwest and the Midlands. & # 39;

Dr. Alison Pittard, the dean of the department of intensive care medicine, hinted today that the NHS could collapse because "very, very tired staff" may not have the energy to deal with the tide of "mutated" virus cases.

On the BBC's Andrew Marr Show, she also claimed she had heard of cases of people aged 30 and over suffering from coronavirus in intensive care units, claiming that "younger people will die from Covid".

Ms. Spielman dismissed calls for distance learning, arguing that it would maximize the differences in the circumstances of children's home life.

She added that schools "have become the collective eyes and ears of society, keeping tabs on those in need most" as they "increase the risk of abuse, neglect or exploitation" if schools remain closed.

The Ofsted boss wrote: “There is a real consensus that schools should be the last place to close and the first to reopen, and having advocated it since last spring, I applaud it. Because it is becoming increasingly clear that children's lives cannot simply be put on hold while we wait for vaccination programs to take effect and the waves of infections to subside.

Alarm bells for Boris with Labor on the way, & # 39; Red Wall & # 39; recapture

Focaldata's major MRP poll will sound alarm bells on Downing Street after a tumultuous first year in power

Focaldata's major MRP poll will sound alarm bells on Downing Street after a tumultuous first year in power

According to a massive poll, Boris Johnson is on the verge of losing most of the seats on the "Red Wall" that won his historic election a year ago.

The Prime Minister's constituency also appears to be at stake as Labor makes a comeback and the government battles to contain the coronavirus crisis.

The research conducted by Focaldata will raise alarm bells on Downing Street after a turbulent first year in power – although there is still a long way to go before the next showdown in Westminster.

The company interviewed more than 22,000 people over the course of December when the Christmas bubbles were drastically reduced due to the mutated variant of Covid and ministers were struggling to reach an agreement with the EU.

An MRP method was used that reconciles the life characteristics of the people surveyed with the profiles of the individual constituencies in order to achieve detailed results in a theoretical choice.

The technique is considered to be more accurate than traditional surveys, where local deviations cannot be taken into account.

The result, published in the Sunday Times, showed that neither the Conservatives nor the Labor Party were able to win a direct majority.

The Tories would lose 81 seats, wiping out Mr Johnson's 80-strong majority secured in December 2019, leaving them 284 seats.

Labor would win 282, an increase of 82. That includes 41 seats in the North of England, Midlands and Wales who voted Labor in 2017 before going blue in 2019.

“We cannot interfere with young people's learning or their further development. The longer the pandemic lasts, the truer this is. & # 39;

Former Prime Minister Tony Blair urged the government to give five million vaccinations a week – and said it was hard to see how else schools could stay open.

He told Times Radio, "If I were Prime Minister now, I would tell the Downing Street team," You have to give me a plan to get that up to five million (vaccinations) a week. "

“Assuming we have the vaccine and should have it. I mean, AstraZeneca won't be able to get up to two million doses a week this week or next, but the week after, that's just AstraZeneca.

“They could probably do more if they knew the system was able to absorb the amount of vaccines they would produce.

"They should get approval for the Johnson & Johnson vaccine by the end of January. Then they finish their studies, and then we should be able to get them up and running in February."

Mr Blair said a "gradual change" in the vaccination program was the only real prospect of keeping children in schools.

He said: “On the one hand, it is a disaster for school children, especially the poorest school children, if they are not educated.

“But it's also completely understandable that teachers and parents should say, not because they think their children… the risk to children is very, very small, it's the risk to transmission rates, and it's the risk to teachers and parents and therefore for those who they are parents mingle with.

"For all these reasons, it is emphasized again why it is so important to get vaccination going."

Brighton and Hove City Council has assisted eight London authorities in challenging primaries that are remotely advised of rising Covid cases.

The National Education Union, which has 450,000 members, said the government “failed to protect children, their families and our communities,” adding that its members have a legal right to refuse to work.

The move has put her on a collision course with Education Secretary Gavin Williamson, who said it was imperative that the nation's children be back in class to prevent them from falling behind.

The father of two wrote The Mail on Sunday urging teachers and parents to "move heaven and earth." The young should not bear "the highest costs" of the pandemic.

He said, “My two daughters, one of whom is in an exam year, have had to self-isolate. I know how difficult the last year was because I saw that they missed being where they want to be in the classroom.

"I want my children and all children to be able to go back to school and stay in class. We will continue to prioritize so that this happens where we can."

When asked what his message was to the councils in England saying that their schools should close, Mr Johnson said, “My message to such councils is that they should be guided by public health advice which schools are currently safe are the areas where we will not be driven by the new variant to close them.

“That the priority must be raising children, but of course we want to work with them. I mean, we have to be humble about the impact of this new variant of the virus.

"Let's face it, we have very difficult weeks and months before the vaccine goes live."

Tony Blair: "Stepping up" vaccines is the only way to save schools

Tony Blair urged the government to have five million vaccinations a week – and said it was hard to see how else schools could stay open.

The former prime minister told Times Radio, "If I were prime minister now, I would tell the Downing Street team, 'You have to give me a plan to get that up to five million (vaccinations) a week. "

“Assuming we have the vaccine and should have it. I mean, AstraZeneca won't be able to get up to two million doses a week this week or next, but the week after, that's just AstraZeneca.

“They could probably do more if they knew the system was able to absorb the amount of vaccines they would produce.

"They should get approval for the Johnson & Johnson vaccine by the end of January. Then they finish their studies, and then we should be able to get them up and running in February."

Mr Blair said a "gradual change" in the vaccination program was the only real prospect of keeping children in schools.

He said: “On the one hand, it is a disaster for school children, especially the poorest school children, if they are not educated.

“But it's also completely understandable that teachers and parents should say, not because they think their children… the risk to children is very, very small, it's the risk to transmission rates, and it's the risk to teachers and parents and therefore for those who they are parents mingle with.

"For all these reasons, it is emphasized again why it is so important to get vaccination going."

The prime minister hopes lateral flow tests will allow schools to return.

He said, “We will work with local authorities, schools and leaders across the country.

“Our advice remains the same. For public health reasons, in the vast majority of the country, in much of the country, we think it makes sense to keep schools open, elementary schools, as you know secondary schools return a bit later.

“And the second thing is that we're going to be pushing testing across the system, and I don't think people would have focused enough on it if I was allowed to for just a second.

“One of the things we didn't have when we went into the first lockdown where we sadly had to close schools was that we didn't have that many cross flow tests.

"We now have hundreds of millions of cross-flow tests that I believe and hope can be used, especially in secondary schools to aid school returns."

Anne Longfield, England's Commissioner for Children, has called for teachers to be vaccinated "as a matter of priority" as she said that any school closure "should be used very well for the bare minimum of time".

She told the BBC News Channel: “Schools need to be a priority for children, not just for their education but also for their wellbeing.

“Schools should be the last to close and the first to open, so this is a serious moment for children.

“If there has to be closings, we've seen closings in secondary schools for two weeks now, but if there has to be closings at all, it has to be for the bare minimum of time and that time has to be used very well.

“I want teachers to be given vaccinations as a priority. We haven't heard that from the government, but I think it's very, very necessary. & # 39;

Greater Manchester Mayor Andy Burnham suggested that tomorrow, when most elementary school children in England return to school, it could be a “chaotic situation”.

He told the BBC's breakfast program: “There are a lot of parents in Greater Manchester who are waking up rather anxious this morning, including teachers and support staff in schools and children, of course.

“So there are a lot of people who are worried about what is happening, and I think the really important thing is that this is not going to be a big political battle today.

“What we need to find is a practical way through all of this. I would say the current rate won't work. & # 39;

He added, "It's going to be a pretty chaotic situation tomorrow I think given all the fears people have."

The government is keen to get children back to school, but leftist councils joined in a revolt against plans when the UK's largest union told members that return was not safe

The government is keen to get children back to school, but leftist councils joined in a revolt against plans when the UK's largest union told members that return was not safe

Ofsted's chief inspector Amanda Spielman said school closings should be kept to the "bare minimum" as Education Secretary Gavin Williamson urges teachers and parents to "move heaven and earth," adding that the boys are not "the highest cost." “The pandemic

Ofsted's chief inspector Amanda Spielman said school closings should be kept to the "bare minimum" as Education Secretary Gavin Williamson urges teachers and parents to "move heaven and earth," adding that the boys are not "the highest cost." “The pandemic

Ofsted's chief inspector Amanda Spielman said school closings should be kept to the "bare minimum" as Education Secretary Gavin Williamson urges teachers and parents to "move heaven and earth," adding that the boys are not "the highest cost." “The pandemic

Another 57,725 had positive test results in the last 24 hours, meaning 2,599,789 have had the disease in the UK since the pandemic started. The country recorded another 445 deaths

Another 57,725 had positive test results in the last 24 hours, meaning 2,599,789 have had the disease in the UK since the pandemic started. The country recorded another 445 deaths

PM swears tens of millions of shocks and bureaucracy by March

Boris Johnson today vowed that "tens of millions" of coronavirus vaccine doses will be administered by March – as he admitted ministers need to cut the "absurd" red tape that is preventing retired doctors from joining the effort.

The prime minister refused to give precise figures on how many people will be vaccinated, apart from the government's plan to use two million shocks a week.

But he said, "What I can tell you is that … we hope we can make tens of millions in the next three months."

The Oxford University and AstraZeneca vaccine is due to be administered from tomorrow. The British process is one of the fastest in the world so far.

Experts have warned that the UK's exit from the crippling lockdown depends on having at least 25 million vulnerable people vaccinated by spring.

The gap between the first and second vaccine dose is widened to reach more people.

Meanwhile, there have been concerns that tens of thousands of recently retired general practitioners, surgeons, and nurses are no longer able to help because of the bureaucracy involved.

In the criticism, more and more “ridiculous” demands were made, for example the requirement to be certified in fire protection or to be trained in the prevention of radicalization.

When asked about the complaints, Mr Johnson said, "I find it absurd and I know the Secretary of Health is taking steps to get rid of this pointless red tape."

Mr Burnham requested that local decision-making be made possible before the primary schools return to England.

He said, “I think there are two options in front of the government. One is to leave decision-making to the councils, who work with the local schools to make decisions about the reality of events in different communities.

“The other is to put elementary and special schools on the same path as secondary schools, and that would be a bit of a delay in opening.

“What I would say to the Prime Minister who I know will be on the BBC this morning is that it has to be one of those options.

"Local flexibility or a delay in opening because I think just plowing forward would get people pretty worried today."

Mr Burnham suggested that a "blanket approach" to reopening schools was not the right approach.

When asked what he would say to a school principal in South Manchester who refused to open on Monday, the Greater Manchester Mayor said, “I would say to the principal, go to the public health director in your community.

“So if it's Trafford in the case of South Manchester, or Manchester itself, that would be the best that people can do.

“And what I am telling the government today are public health directors who work with council presidents and individual schools to make the right decisions for those schools.

“Let the mind come to a balanced judgment based on what is happening. Greater Manchester is currently below the UK average for the number of cases.

"So the position is different in different parts of the country and I think a blanket approach of either reopening the ceiling or saying the ceiling in some way is causing the problem. Local flexibility might be just the way to go."

Mr Johnson today vowed that "tens of millions" of coronavirus vaccine doses will be given by March – as he admitted ministers need to cut the "absurd" red tape to prevent retired medical professionals from joining the effort.

The National Education Union tweeted earlier today, "Our executive is meeting this morning and we will be releasing new guidelines shortly thereafter."

The National Education Union tweeted earlier today, "Our executive is meeting this morning and we will be releasing new guidelines shortly thereafter."

A tweet from the National Education Union today: “We currently have thousands of representatives from all over the country on our briefing. We have to #MakeSchoolsSafe to #ProtectCommunities & # 39;

A tweet from the National Education Union today: “We currently have thousands of representatives from all over the country on our briefing. We have to #MakeSchoolsSafe to #ProtectCommunities & # 39;

Children Minister Vicky Ford told MPs yesterday that there was no evidence that the new strain caused any more serious illnesses in adults or children

Kinderministerin Vicky Ford sagte gestern den Abgeordneten, es gebe keine Beweise dafür, dass die neue Sorte bei Erwachsenen oder Kindern schwerere Krankheiten verursachte

School principals are calling for the GCSE and A-Level exams to be canceled this summer amid the chaos of the school closings

School principals are calling on the government to cancel the GCSE and A-level exams this summer amid indignation about Gavin Williamson's plans to keep schools open.

Most pre-schools in England are expected to reopen their doors tomorrow, while secondary schools will reopen in a staggered manner later this month with plans to test every student on a weekly basis.

However, yesterday the UK's largest apprenticeship union told its members that it was not safe to return to the classroom. Several left-wing councils called for their elementary schools to switch to online teaching only.

And in yet another blow to the Minister of Education's plans, UK school principals are now calling for this year's exams to be canceled in order to give priority to "overall public health, the safety of students and staff".

They also claim that it would be unfair to force students to take exams if those whose schools opened earlier had more contact time than those with later start dates.

The worthless? The campaign group – a gathering of 2,000 school principals in 80 local authorities – said: “Greater public health, the safety of students and staff should take precedence over exams.

"Public safety should not be compromised or driven by an inflexible pursuit of GCSE and high school diplomas."

Headmaster of Tanbridge House School in Horsham – and one of the WorthLess? Leader – told the Times: "There is great skepticism that exams can now be conducted fairly."

Der Premierminister weigerte sich, genaue Zahlen darüber anzugeben, wie viele Menschen geimpft werden, abgesehen davon, dass die Regierung zwei Millionen Stöße pro Woche einsetzen will.

Aber er sagte: "Was ich Ihnen sagen kann, ist, dass … wir hoffen, dass wir in den nächsten drei Monaten zig Millionen schaffen können."

Der Impfstoff der Universität Oxford und von AstraZeneca soll ab morgen verabreicht werden. Der britische Prozess gehört bislang zu den schnellsten der Welt.

Experten haben gewarnt, dass der Ausstieg Großbritanniens aus der lähmenden Sperrung davon abhängt, dass bis zum Frühjahr mindestens 25 Millionen schutzbedürftige Menschen geimpft werden.

Die Lücke zwischen der ersten und der zweiten Impfstoffdosis wird vergrößert, um mehr Menschen zu erreichen.

In der Zwischenzeit gab es Bedenken, dass Zehntausende von kürzlich pensionierten Allgemeinärzten, Chirurgen und Krankenschwestern aufgrund der damit verbundenen Bürokratie nicht mehr mithelfen können.

In der Kritik wurden immer mehr „lächerliche“ Forderungen laut, beispielsweise die Anforderung, im Brandschutz zertifiziert zu sein oder in der Verhinderung von Radikalisierung geschult zu sein.

Auf die Beschwerden angesprochen, sagte Herr Johnson: "Ich finde es absurd und ich weiß, dass der Gesundheitsminister Schritte unternimmt, um diese sinnlose Bürokratie loszuwerden."

Der Premierminister drängte darauf, ob er in der Downing Street bleiben würde, nachdem er Großbritannien endgültig aus der EU herausgenommen hatte, und bestand darauf: "Ja."

Herr Johnson fuhr fort: „Ich denke, Sie sollten aus Ihrer charakteristischen Dunkelheit ausbrechen, wenn ich so sagen darf, Andrew.

„Die Dinge sind sehr schwierig, wir erleben als Land eine sehr schwierige Zeit, aber ich denke wirklich, die Menschen sollten sich auf die erstaunliche Tatsache konzentrieren, dass dieses Land einen Impfstoff bei Raumtemperatur entwickelt hat, der auf der ganzen Welt eingesetzt werden kann.

"Und wir haben jetzt Freiheiten, die wir seit 50 Jahren nicht mehr hatten, und es gibt viele Gründe, dieses ansonsten düstere neue Jahr sehr positiv zu bewerten."

Während die Reihe der Schulen tobt, drängte NAHT-Generalsekretär Paul Whiteman auf eine Rückkehr zu Schulen, die "nachhaltig" ist, da er das Bildungsministerium beschuldigte, "Entscheidungen in letzter Minute zu treffen, weil sie keine proaktiven Maßnahmen ergriffen haben".

"Neben den Eltern gibt es niemanden, der sich mehr für die Betreuung und Erziehung von Kindern einsetzt als die Schulleiter und ihre Teams", sagte er gegenüber BBC Breakfast.

„Und jeder, der versucht, das Bild zu zeichnen, dass wir gegen die Fürsorge und Erziehung von Kindern sind, tut dies einfach und führt die Öffentlichkeit aus politischen Gründen in die Irre.

„Wir sprechen über das Verständnis der Risiken. Machen Sie eine kurze Pause, damit wir die richtigen Abhilfemaßnahmen in den Schulen vereinbaren können, um sie Covid-sicher zu machen, sicherzustellen, dass Mitarbeiter und Teams geimpft sind und dass wir in den Schulen ein ordnungsgemäß unterstütztes Testregime erhalten, um sie so sicher wie möglich zu machen.

„Und dann eine geordnete Rückkehr in die Schule, die nachhaltig ist, und nicht das Chaos, das wir während der Pandemie erlebt haben. Das DfE trifft Entscheidungen in letzter Minute, weil sie keine proaktiven Maßnahmen ergriffen haben.

"Wir sind uns also einig, dass die Schule der beste Ort für Kinder ist. Wir wollen das einfach gut machen, wir wollen eine nachhaltige Rückkehr erzielen."

Boris besteht darauf, dass er die Downing Street nicht verlässt

Boris Johnson bestand heute darauf, dass er No10 trotz Spekulationen, dass er sich entscheiden könnte, wegzugehen, nicht verlassen wird.

Auf die Frage gedrängt, ob er in der Downing Street bleiben würde, nachdem er Großbritannien endgültig aus der EU herausgenommen hatte, sagte der Premierminister gegenüber BBC1s The Andrew Marr Show: "Ja."

Herr Johnson fuhr fort: „Ich denke, Sie sollten aus Ihrer charakteristischen Dunkelheit ausbrechen, wenn ich so sagen darf, Andrew.

„Die Dinge sind sehr schwierig, wir erleben als Land eine sehr schwierige Zeit, aber ich denke wirklich, die Menschen sollten sich auf die erstaunliche Tatsache konzentrieren, dass dieses Land einen Impfstoff bei Raumtemperatur entwickelt hat, der auf der ganzen Welt eingesetzt werden kann.

"Und wir haben jetzt Freiheiten, die wir seit 50 Jahren nicht mehr hatten, und es gibt viele Gründe, dieses ansonsten düstere neue Jahr sehr positiv zu bewerten."

Der Beginn des neuen akademischen Semesters war verwirrt, da die Covid-Raten aufgrund der neuen Variante weiter steigen.

Jüngste Notizen der Wissenschaftlichen Beratergruppe für Notfälle (SAGE) haben ergeben, dass Wissenschaftler gewarnt haben, dass Schulen möglicherweise geschlossen werden müssen, um die Übertragung zu beeinträchtigen.

But Children's Minister Vicky Ford yesterday told MPs there was no evidence that the new strain caused more serious illness in either adults or children.

Senior Government sources said that Mr Williamson had tried to keep schools open but has been overruled by Health Secretary Matt Hancock and Michael Gove.

The pair have pushed for tighter measures until more people have been vaccinated, but critics accused them of 'natural authoritarianism'.

Last week, Mr Williamson announced all primaries would return on Monday. Ten London boroughs were told to open their schools but after a revolt by eight Labour-led councils, Mr Williamson was forced into a U-turn.

Now all schools in the capital will operate remote learning for the first two weeks.

The rebellion was led initially by Haringey, once dubbed the first 'Corbyn council' because of its large number of Left-wing Momentum councillors.

Council leader Joseph Ejiofor said he would back head teachers who wanted to defy the Government and he was later followed by Harrow Council.

Brighton and Hove has now advised all primary schools to teach remotely until January 18.

Social distancing signs displayed at Coldfall Primary School in Muswell Hill, London, today as Covid cases across the capital city have been putting rising pressure on the NHS

Social distancing signs displayed at Coldfall Primary School in Muswell Hill, London, today as Covid cases across the capital city have been putting rising pressure on the NHS

Liverpool's Labour-run city council calls for another national lockdown to stop spread of mutant Covid strain and prevent 'catastrophe'

Liverpool council presidents today called for a third national lockdown to contain the new "mutant" strain of Covid and prevent a "catastrophe".

The city's incumbent mayor Wendy Simon and the cabinet of the Labor-led city council say the rate of rise in coronavirus cases has reached "alarming levels" and that urgent action is needed to save lives and the NHS.

The new "mutated" strain of Covid is believed to have a higher transmission rate and is most common in London and the South East, where health bosses say hospitals are overburdened.

The tribe is believed to spread from south to north, creating increasing pressure on the NHS.

Cases in Liverpool have nearly tripled to 350 per 100,000 in the past two weeks, despite the city leading the pilot for community testing, which resulted in it becoming the first city to switch from Tier 3 to Tier 2 .

Chris McGovern, chairman of the Campaign for Real Education, has accused the Left of politicising the issue saying: 'This is about knocking the Tories. Keeping schools open should be non-negotiable.'

Last night, the Ministry of Education said distance learning was "a last resort" and classrooms should be reopened "wherever possible" with appropriate security measures to reduce the risk of transmission.

"As we said earlier, as a last resort, we will move to distance learning with the involvement of public health officials in areas where infections and pressures on the NHS are greatest," the spokesman said.

More than one million four to 11-year-olds will now start the academic term with lessons online.

In advising members to work from home, Dr Mary Bousted, the NEU's joint general secretary, said: 'If Government does not act to follow the science, we must.' Her views were echoed by the NASUWT union.

Ministers are considering proposals to make teachers a higher priority in the vaccine roll-out as a way to keep physical classrooms open.

Hundreds of new vaccination sites are set to go live this week as the NHS steps up its vaccination program with the newly approved Oxford University and AstraZeneca Jab.

As of Monday, around 530,000 doses of the vaccine will be available for launch across the UK. More than a million patients have already received their first dose of the Pfizer / BioNTech vaccine, which was the first to be approved by the drug and healthcare regulator.

Union leader Sir Keir Starmer said the launch of the vaccine was "our great hope", adding, "I want the government to do everything possible to harness our NHS 'exceptional talents so we can vaccinate at least two million Britons a week until the end of the month. & # 39;

But as he wrote in the Sunday Mirror, he criticized "a chaotic last-minute U-turn in schools" adding, "Parents, teachers and students are confused about who will and will not be back in school tomorrow."

Plans for schools reopening differ across the four nations of the UK. In Scotland, most pupils will have online learning for the week of January 11. In Wales, schools are expected to provide face-to-face learning for the majority of their pupils by January 11.

And in Northern Ireland, secondary school years eight to 11 will be taught via remote learning throughout January while primary pupils will return to the classroom on January 11.

Linda Bauld, professor of public health at the University of Edinburgh, said transmission among elementary school students is "still very limited" while secondary school students, especially older teens, can pass the virus on in the same way as adults.

However, health professionals have warned of increasing pressure on services. Professor Andrew Goddard, president of the Royal College of Physicians, said current case numbers from the BBC are "pretty mild" compared to expectations for a week.

GAVIN WILLIAMSON: We must all move heaven and earth to get children back into the classroom

By Gavin Williamson, Secretary of State for Education

I remain optimistic that with the roll-out of the Covid-19 vaccine, 2021 will be the year we overcome coronavirus. At the same time, as a dad, it is clear to me that while this takes place, I want my children to be at school.

Keeping our kids out of classrooms is damaging. We know that as parents and we know it from the data. It is for this reason that keeping schools open has been a national priority.

Naturally, as parents would expect, this includes taking a proportionate response and considering the clear damage that we know is caused to young people's education and wellbeing by closing education.

With the new variant, the goal posts have shifted as we fight this horrible virus, but I want to assure parents that we have been working throughout the holidays to make the return as safe as possible.

This means pushing back the staggered start date for all secondary schools by one week.

Writing in The Mail on Sunday, Education Secretary Gavin Williamson, said it was imperative that the nation’s children were back in class to stop them falling behind. He urged teachers and parents to ‘move heaven and earth’, adding the young must not ‘bear the heaviest cost’ of the pandemic

Writing in The Mail on Sunday, Education Secretary Gavin Williamson, said it was imperative that the nation's children were back in class to stop them falling behind. He urged teachers and parents to 'move heaven and earth', adding the young must not 'bear the heaviest cost' of the pandemic

It also means triggering our contingency plans, so that in some areas where there are high transmission rates of the virus or those rates are rising quickly, schools should offer face-to-face education to exam year groups, vulnerable and critical-worker children, and remote education to all other students – so no child misses out on education.

We have identified the areas where primary schools must move to this system from tomorrow and will do the same for secondary schools before pupils are due to return on the 18th.

Our fantastic teachers have already worked tirelessly to make schools Covid-secure, and it remains the case that schools are safe.

For secondary schools and colleges, we are also rolling out mass testing to make schools, the pupils attending them, and the wider community even safer. I want to be clear what this means: all secondary school students and staff will be offered tests before they go back to school – whether their school is open to all pupils or to some.

This kind of mass testing will help protect not just children and young people, it will benefit everyone in the community because it will break the chains of transmission that are making infection rates shoot up.

This in turn will make it safer for more children to physically return to school.

Teachers are not expected to carry out the tests themselves, and 1,500 members of the armed forces will provide support to schools and colleges in this important mission.

While this takes place, schools and colleges will stagger the return of their students.

Those in exam years will be educated remotely during the first week of term, and face-to-face beginning on January 11, with other secondary schools and college students returning full time on January 18, in areas where we have not had to apply the contingency framework.

Vulnerable children and the children of key workers should be educated face-to-face from the start of term in all circumstances.

For now, given how prevalent the virus is in London and after engagement with London leaders, primary schools in our capital will only open for vulnerable and critical worker children tomorrow.

We will continually review the data and allow more pupils to return as soon as possible.

During this time we are taking unprecedented action to ensure remote education is delivered to all children.

We will deliver over 50,000 laptops and tablets to schools across the country tomorrow, and over 100,000 in total during the first week of term. In total, we've delivered over 500,000 and are on our way to our target of nearly one million.

We are taking these measures because it is what we need to do to overcome and suppress the transmission of the virus in communities.

These decisions are not political calculations, they are concrete steps to support our children's education, futures and dreams – which must not be put on hold.

The safety of teachers and pupils will always be paramount, but we must all move heaven and earth to get children back to the classroom where they best thrive.

Both of my daughters, one of whom is in an exam year, have had to self-isolate. I know how difficult the last year has been, because I have seen them miss being in the classroom, where they want to be.

So I want my children, and all children, to be able to get back to school and stay in class – we will continue to prioritise making this happen where we can.

In all of this, we must all face up to the fact that, unfortunately, there is a new variant of Covid and that this is spreading across the country.

But it remains our duty to provide a future for our children that is full of hope and opportunity.

This year, my admiration for teachers and all that they do has reached an even higher level, and it gives me faith in how we will continue to fight this virus.

The fight has already been a long one, and many have lost so much, but we must remain steadfast in our final push. As a nation we are in this together and we will overcome it together, as our country always does.

During this time, I remain determined to do all I can to protect our children, protect education and ensure the youngest in our society do not bear the heaviest cost while beating this virus.

Marquees in playgrounds as operation begins to start testing 3.4million pupils

By Max Aitchison and Julie Henry

Final preparations are under way to begin the mass testing of England's 3.4 million secondary school students from January 11.

School halls are being hastily converted and in some cases marquees will be erected in playgrounds.

It is hoped the programme will eventually see all 11 to 18-year-olds at 3,456 state schools, as well as colleges and private schools, tested regularly. The aim is to spot asymptomatic coronavirus cases and prevent large numbers of students being sent home to self-isolate.

Final preparations are under way to begin the mass testing of England’s 3.4 million secondary school students from January 11 (stock image)

Final preparations are under way to begin the mass testing of England's 3.4 million secondary school students from January 11 (stock image)

From tomorrow, schools will begin to receive deliveries of up to 1,000 lateral flow device testing kits and PPE. The kits, which require either a nasal or throat swab, can produce results in under 30 minutes.

The Harris Federation, which has 28 secondary schools, will use gyms and marquees to administer the tests. CEO Sir Daniel Moynihan said: 'There is an enormous gap between those who come from low income backgrounds and those that don't.

'The pandemic has made that worse. If we want a fairer society and levelling up, we need kids in school.' Most secondary students will return on January 18, but 760,000 in exam years 11 and 13 go back on January 11. They will receive one test before their first lesson and a follow-up three days later. Staff will be tested once a week.

Anyone who tests positive will then take a more accurate PCR test before leaving the premises to self-isolate. They will not be allowed to get public transport home and their close contacts will be offered daily tests for seven days so they can stay in school or college rather than have to isolate at home. Ministers are also considering whether to extend the guidance on wearing masks in communal areas to inside secondary school classrooms.

Just under 1.5 per cent of pupils and teachers in English secondary schools tested positive for coronavirus in the week ending November 19, according to the Office for National Statistics, but since then the new Covid-19 variant has spread rapidly.

The testing scheme was initially optional, but made mandatory by the Government last Thursday. Children under 16 will need the signed consent of their parents for tests. Older students must agree to it themselves.

A trial scheme at Painsley Catholic College in Cheadle, Staffordshire, had a take-up rate of 80 per cent. CEO Steve Bell said: 'It's a lot to get your head around and the mass of documentation and demands can put anxiety levels through the roof, but that soon disappears when everyone realises it is very straightforward.'

Three schools in the nationwide Star Academies Trust also participated in a pilot scheme, recruiting exam invigilators and cleaners who had already been vetted.

Its CEO, Hamid Patel, said: 'School leaders and teachers are understandably fatigued after many months of managing the crisis. The tight timetable has added to the challenges but it is manageable with creative thinking, planning and determination.'

Each school will have to deploy a team covering seven different roles: team leader, test assistants, processors, a Covid-19 coordinator, registration assistants, result recorders and cleaners. None of the roles require any clinical experience as most students will do the swabs themselves. But experts have criticised the reliability of self-administered tests, claiming they miss as many as half of cases. To counter that, some schools are enlisting the help of medical professionals.

Chris Ramsey, headmaster of Whitgift School in Croydon, South London, said: 'It's not fair to expect volunteers, teachers or the boys to take responsibility.'

The Government has set aside £78 million for the scheme, but there are warnings that will run out within weeks. Private schools must fund the project themselves.

Roughly 45,000 people will be needed to help with the tests and some schools will need paid staff to help. Some are advertising for 'Covid testing assistants' paid between £10 and £17-an-hour. Chris Parkinson, principal of Bosworth Academy in Leicester, said: 'The biggest challenge is getting the workforce in place.'

The only guidance offered by the Government is a 30-page handbook alongside online sessions. Some 1,500 military personnel will offer support but only online or by phone.

Criticising the scheme, Geoff Barton, General Secretary of the Association of School and College Leaders, said: 'Ministers need to remember that schools and colleges are educational institutions, not medical facilities, and it has to support this testing programme properly.'

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