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Boris Johnson sets a vision for the UK after Covid


Boris Johnson pleaded for Tories to continue believing in his instincts and how to deal with the coronavirus crisis, and for Britain to present a true blue vision after fighting the disease.

The prime minister admitted that 2020 "was not the year we envisioned" but insisted that the devastating effects of the pandemic would not prevent the government from moving forward with its post-Brexit "leveling-up" agenda.

Addressing the "virtual" Tory conference, Mr. Johnson said – without his usual interaction with a live audience – he was working "for the day life is back to normal" and appealed to people not to go through the grueling ban to allow. Take us down & # 39 ;.

He nodded to growing conservative anger over violations of civil liberties and the freezing of the economy, and deeply regretted the restrictions imposed by the government – but warned that "there is simply no reasonable alternative".

He did his best to reassure those who questioned his Tory values, and promised to push the state back as soon as possible. He suggested the idea that the taxpayer could be "Uncle Sugar" and continue to fund any part of the economy, and praised the entrepreneurs.

Mr Johnson also promised to save the dream of owning a home for a new generation with a 95 percent mortgage, slapping those who asked the country to document its colonial past, saying he was "not embarrassed "To sing Rule Britannia.

He said it would not be enough to return the same way and the government was determined to "rebuild better". Real change could be made in such crises, and he would use the moment to do so.

The prime minister gave an angry response to claims he had "lost his mojo" and not fully recovered from his own brush with coronavirus, offering "arm wrestling or leg crushing" to prove otherwise.

The keynote address read as follows:

  • Scotland could face a new circuit breaker lockdown in a matter of days despite a warning to Nicola Sturgeon that it will be a disaster for the economy
  • The government's Covid model guru warned today that pubs may have to be closed entirely to keep schools open Boris Johnson faces a Tory riot against the 10pm curfew;
  • Rishi Sunak suggested tax hikes could be delayed to save jobs today, as it turned out that companies have already made plans to lay off 500,000 people during the working period Crisis;
  • Tory MPs are already expressing dissatisfaction with the drive to increase wind-generated energy.

In an address to the "virtual" Tory conference, Boris Johnson said – without his usual interaction with a live audience – that he was working "for the day when life is back to normal".

Infections in the UK have skyrocketed in the past few days due to an embarrassing counting error

Infections in the UK have skyrocketed in the past few days due to an embarrassing counting error

Boris Johnson's speech, key points:

  • He said he has "had more than enough of this disease that affects not only people but so many of the greatest things in our country".
  • We are committed to "repelling this virus, and we shall succeed just as this country has defeated every alien invader for the past 1,000 years".
  • Blasted claims his own illness robbed him of his "mojo" as "seditious propaganda" and "sucker".
  • Offered to take over his critics in "arm wrestling, leg wrestling, Cumberland wrestling, sprint-off, as you call it" – but admitted he was too fat and has since lost 26 pounds.
  • Likened his illness to the UK economy as being superficially healthy but with underlying problems.
  • Warned Britain could not go back to what it was before, when & # 39; we lost too much, we mourned too many … we went through too much frustration and hardship just to be satisfied with the status quo ante to give to believe that life can go on like it did before the plague and we will not '.
  • promised to & # 39; fix the injustice of funding for nursing homes & # 39; and & # 39; care for the caregivers as they look after us & # 39 ;.
  • Vowed to "reform our system of government, renew our infrastructure, spread opportunities more widely and fairly, and create the conditions for a dynamic recovery that is led not by the state but by free enterprise".
  • Distancing himself from years of austerity measures, said, “After 12 years of relative anemia, we need to increase the trend growth rate. We need to increase people's incomes, not just go back to where we were. "
  • Praise Rishi Sunak for his workno conservative chancellor would have wanted to do that, except in times of war or disaster. "
  • Defending its lockdown, said: “This government has been forced by the pandemic to erode freedom, which we deeply regret, and to expand the role of the state from enforcing the lockdown to the many bailouts and subsidies that go against our instincts. But we accept them because there is simply no reasonable alternative. & # 39;

Recognizing the public weariness fighting the coronavirus, Mr Johnson said, "The fact is we're not in Birmingham … there's no one to clap and pant …"

“I don't know about you, but I've had more than enough of this disease that affects not only people but so many of the greatest things in our country – our pubs, our clubs, our football, our theater, and all that gossiping socializing and Love of human contact that drives the creativity of our economy. & # 39;

Mr Johnson said Britain would manage to fight off the virus "just as this country has seen every extraterrestrial invader for the past thousand years".

But the Prime Minister said it was not enough to go back to the way it was. "I can tell you that this government is working day and night to fight this virus off, and we will succeed, just as this country has repelled every alien invader for the past 100 years," he said.

“After everything we've been through, it's not enough to just go back. We lost too much, we mourned too many, ”he said.

“We have gone through too much frustration and hardship to be content with the status quo ante and believe that life can go on as it did before the plague, and we will not.

"So this government is better off dismantling."

Mr Johnson effectively appealed to the Conservatives to remain true to him and his instincts.

"This government has been forced by the pandemic to erode freedom, which we deeply regret, and to expand the role of the state from enforcing the lockdown to the many bailouts and subsidies that go against our instincts," he said.

"But we accept them because there is simply no reasonable alternative."

Mr Johnson tried to polish his own credentials as a libertarian Tory in a small state.

"We must not draw the wrong economic conclusions from this crisis," he said.

"Rishi Sunak, the Chancellor, has come up with some excellent tools to help businesses protect jobs and livelihoods, but let's face it, he has done things that no Conservative Chancellor would have wanted to do, except in times of war or disaster . "

Mr Johnson said he was determined to make progress by turning "generation rent into generation buy" by "fixing our broken housing market".

"We will reshape the sclerotic planning system and make it faster and easier to build beautiful new homes without destroying the green belt or desecrating our landscape," he said.

“But these reforms will take time and they will not be enough on their own. We now need to push ahead with one of the key proposals in our 2019 manifesto: giving young first-time buyers the opportunity to take out a long-term fixed-rate mortgage of up to 95 percent of the value of their home – significantly reducing the size of the deposit. "

He added, “We believe these policies could create two million more owner-occupiers – the largest increase in home ownership since the 1980s. We will help transform generation rent into generation buy. & # 39;

He promised to move at "storm speed" to put the environment at the center of his approach and said he would make the UK the world leader in offshore wind technology and create up to 60,000 jobs.

He said of his ten year plan, “You heard me right. Your kettle, washing machine, stove, heater, plug-in electric vehicle – the whole bunch of them will get their juice clean and without guilt from the breeze that blows around these islands. & # 39;

Mr Johnson tried to divert attention from the recent test fiascos and Covid clampdowns by insisting that the government can address other issues as well.

He claimed good progress had been made in recruiting more nurses and police officers and said the pandemic could also be a catalyst for change as Britain "decays better and greener".

Professor Lockdown warns pubs may close to save schools as the prime minister faces Tory mutiny

The government's Covid model guru warned today that pubs may need to close to keep schools open – as Boris Johnson faces a Tory riot against the 10 p.m. curfew.

Neil Ferguson – known as "Professor Lockdown" – said the additional cases were added to the UK balance sheet after an Excel error painted a "sobering" picture of the outbreak.

He said it was not clear that the government could contain the virus while children remained in secondary schools – and suggested that the wider population must "give up more" in order to keep education going.

This could include closing bars and restaurants altogether, as well as extending the October half-time for a two-week breaker lockout to break transmission chains.

The problems the Prime Minister would face in enforcing such restrictions, however, were exposed when the Conservatives threatened an offer to enforce existing measures, including the rule of six and the 10pm pubs closing time.

Anger has grown on the Tory benches over the government's refusal to exempt younger children from the rule of six – as is the case in Scotland – while many believe the curfew is causing more harm than good by putting on the Streets and house parties fueling celebrations.

He added: “We need to give people the opportunity to prepare for the new jobs that are being created every day – with new technologies and new methods.

"And there is one area where we are literally advancing at the speed of a storm and that is the green economy – the green industrial revolution that will create hundreds of thousands if not millions of jobs over the next decade."

However, the Prime Minister is struggling to get a grip on the coronavirus situation after heightened unrest among his own MPs in some cases.

The government's Covid Model Guru warned today that pubs may have to be closed completely to keep schools open.

Neil Ferguson – known as "Professor Lockdown" – said the additional cases were added to the UK balance sheet after an Excel error painted a "sobering" picture of the outbreak.

He said it was not clear that the government could contain the virus while children remained in secondary schools – and suggested that the wider population "need to give up more" to keep education going.

This could include closing bars and restaurants altogether, as well as extending the October half-time for a two-week breaker lockout to break transmission chains.

The problems the Prime Minister would face in enforcing such restrictions, however, were exposed when the Conservatives threatened an offer to remove existing measures, including the rule of six and pub closings at 10 p.m.

Anger has grown on the Tory benches over the government's refusal to exempt younger children from the rule of six – as is the case in Scotland – while many believe the curfew is causing more harm than good by putting on the Streets and house parties fueling celebrations.

The plan provides for a four-fold increase in offshore capacity, with the number of turbines increasing from around 1,800 to over 7,000.

Great Britain is already testing the world's largest turbine blade. A 350-foot model is being tested off the Northumberland coast.

The Prime Minister will today pledge funds for the development of floating turbines in deep water locations, where the wind is often strongest.

Government sources said ministers would put "tough requirements on helping UK manufacturers" to ensure that at least 60 percent of equipment is made in that country.

Mr Johnson will acknowledge that for many years the Tory Party had mixed feelings about wind power, with David Cameron limiting the number of turbines that could be built on land.

Mr Johnson's speech was not marred by the misplaced Autocue that had hit other senior ministers - including Rishi Sunak yesterday

Mr Johnson's speech was not marred by the misplaced Autocue that had hit other senior ministers – including Rishi Sunak yesterday

He will use his speech at the Conservative Party's "virtual" conference to develop a radical green energy plan for the construction of thousands of coastal turbines. Pictured: Teeside Offshore Windfarm at Redcar in North East England

He will use his speech at the Conservative Party's "virtual" conference to develop a radical green energy plan for the construction of thousands of coastal turbines. Pictured: Teeside Offshore Windfarm at Redcar in North East England

The Prime Minister promises to move with "storm force" and wants to make the UK the world leader in offshore wind technology and create up to 60,000 jobs

The Prime Minister promises to move with "storm force" and wants to make the UK the world leader in offshore wind technology and create up to 60,000 jobs

But he will say that the equation has changed with the advent of powerful offshore facilities that have generated significant electricity and fewer public protests.

The government already had the goal of increasing the amount of electricity generated by offshore wind from the current 10 gigawatts to 30 GW by 2030.

That target now rises to 40 GW by the same date.

By comparison, the nuclear power plant built at Hinkley Point in Somerset is expected to generate around 3.3 GW.

Rapid technological advances have led to a drop in prices. Wind-generated electricity now costs less than half the forecast Hinkley Point electricity price.

Government sources said the proportion of electricity generated by offshore wind in the UK would increase from around 10 percent today to around 40 percent – more than enough to power every home.