ENTERTAINMENT

Boris Johnson says "absolutely every student needs to be back at school next week" during the virtual Q&A


Boris Johnson said "absolutely every student must be back in school by next week," as Dr. Jenny Harries says the evidence of face covering "is not very strong in either direction".

The Prime Minister said it was important for students to return to school during a question-and-answer session with parents on Friday starting next week.

He added that schools are the last part of society the government wants to shut down in the event of local lockdowns, as Dr. Jenny Harries pointed out that there was no “strong” evidence of face covering.

Boris Johnson said "absolutely every student needs to be back at school" during a Q&A with parents starting next week

Boris Johnson said, “Absolutely every student needs to be back in school next week and in the days that follow when schools return.

“Now is the time to safely return to school and the evidence is overwhelming that it is in the interests of the wellbeing and health of children, adolescents and students to be back in school rather than missing out more.

"So it's the healthy and safe thing."

On the subject of face masks for students, Dr. Harries: “The evidence for face covering is not very strong either way.

"We're continuing to learn … about how the virus is transmitted, and we may change advice in the future – that's because we're watching the science."

Dr. Harries said, "Right now the evidence is pretty stable, but in these closed environments it can be very comforting for children and teachers alike to know that people are taking precautions."

Boris Johnson also assured parents that schools will be the “very last” thing in society they want to close in the event of further local lockdowns.

He said: "Even if there are more local lockdowns or more action to stop the spread of the disease locally, which I almost certainly fear because we expect more local peaks, schools will bet the very last bit society we want again." conclude. & # 39;

Parents and other residents asked Boris Johnson questions about specific measures that are being taken to keep students and staff safe.

Boris Johnson also assured parents that schools will be the “very last” thing in society they want to close in the event of further local lockdowns

Boris Johnson also assured parents that schools will be the “very last” thing in society they want to close in the event of further local lockdowns

How can you make sure schools are Covid-19 safe? Mark, Stoke-on-Trent

Boris Johnson assured parents that a number of measures have been taken to ensure schools remain Covid safe.

Mark from Stoke-on-Trent asked the Prime Minister how these measures could prevent employees from being clinically at risk or from living with other vulnerable people.

Boris Johnson said schools have set up single-use systems, hand gel stations are stationed near schools, and students are given basic instructions to help stem the spread of the virus.

Children should wash their hands and observe social distancing to avoid transmission.

Dr. Harries added: “There is a lot of evidence to suggest that transmission in schools is low. This can happen, but it is not common.

“It is much more likely to reflect what is happening in your community than to really be a focus in school.

If there are cases in the community, you can occasionally see one at school. & # 39;

When using disposable systems, hand gel everywhere in your hands and give students basic instructions: "Wash your hands, avoid transmission, observe social distancing."

What preparations are you making to ensure that schooling and education are not similarly disrupted, even if physical attendance is disrupted by short-term local closings during the year? Jacqueline, Norwich

Dr. Harries said parents and teachers shouldn't assume that the entire school will be affected if an individual student or teacher falls ill after the school reopens.

She said: "The whole purpose of security checkpoints at school is to ensure that, as the Prime Minister has said, we have bubbles or collections of children that are socially well delineated so that they can interact with one another, but not too far a group & # 39 ;.

Dr. Harries said parents and teachers shouldn't assume that the entire school will be affected if an individual student or teacher falls ill after the school reopens

Dr. Harries said parents and teachers shouldn't assume that the entire school will be affected if an individual student or teacher falls ill after the school reopens

She added that these strict measures ensure that small groups can be safely asked to self-isolate without endangering the entire school.

Boris Johnson added, “Even if there are more local lockdowns or more action to stop the spread of the disease locally, which I almost certainly fear because we expect more local spikes, schools will bet the very last bit of society we want to close again. & # 39;

How do you go about this when a child in a classroom becomes ill or suddenly has high temperatures? Do students and teachers have to self-isolate within the class for 14 days? Abdus, London

Dr. Harries said that teachers deal with illness every day in classrooms as children are often a little sick and teachers are "very good at handling it."

She added that there are guides out there letting schools know how to safely contact a parent or guardian so the student can go home and get a test.

Dr. Harries said that teachers deal with illness every day in classrooms as children are often a little sick and teachers are "very good at handling it."

Dr. Harries said that teachers deal with illness every day in classrooms as children are often a little sick and teachers are "very good at handling it."

Dr. Harries said if the student is positive, a local health team will work with the school to identify blisters and the children will be carefully watched or come out of school if necessary.

What additional resources will schools, particularly secondary schools, be given to improve their ability to manage the psychological wellbeing of students and staff? Jakki, Cottingham

Boris Johnson said the government is "massively increasing" funding for mental health care, allocating £ 12 billion for that purpose.

He added that they will support local charities to help solve mental health issues as well, and encourage teachers and school staff to undergo specific training.

Boris Johnson said the government is "massively increasing" funding for mental health care, allocating £ 12 billion for that purpose

Boris Johnson said the government is "massively increasing" funding for mental health care, allocating £ 12 billion for that purpose

The Prime Minister said, "I really understand that in the 160 days of lockdown since our school closed, many, many children and young people will no doubt be exposed to stresses that have impacted their mental health."

The government has now announced that children should wear face covers. But what about children who are deaf or need lip reading? Charlotte, Buckinghamshire

Boris Johnson stressed his earlier comment that the government does not want to see face masks in the classroom that are worn by either teachers or students as it is difficult to learn to wear a blanket.

He said, “There is no need for it, in fact there is a need not to have it, Charlotte, because obviously it is very difficult to teach or learn with a face mask. And so that's out. & # 39;

Boris Johnson stressed his earlier comment that the government does not want to see face masks in the classroom that are either worn by teachers or students

Boris Johnson stressed his earlier comment that the government does not want to see face masks in the classroom that are either worn by teachers or students

Children under the age of 11 are not required to wear any face covering in schools. Restrictions only apply to secondary school students.

In hotspot areas where there is a local spike, face masks should be worn in corridors or other areas where social distancing cannot be observed – but those who rely on lip reading would not have to wear one.

He added, "You should be able to read lips and live life as normally as possible."

Dr. Harries spoke more generally of face covering, saying, “The evidence for face covering is not very strong either way.

"We're continuing to learn … about how the virus is transmitted, and we may change advice in the future – that's because we're watching the science."