ENTERTAINMENT

Boris Johnson reveals a huge penalty for those who violate self-isolation rules


Covid sufferers could be fined up to £ 10,000 for leaving their home for self-isolating under the draconian new rules introduced by Boris Johnson.

As his ministers debated the introduction of a second lockdown this weekend that would destroy the economy, the prime minister announced that he would create a new legal obligation for people to self-isolate if they test positive for the virus or Asked to do so by Test and Trace staff

Under a 'carrot-stick' approach, 4 million low-income people who cannot work from home will receive a flat rate of £ 500 if they are forced to self-isolate.

Drinkers hit the city ahead of Boris Johnson's plans to close pubs in England. Nottingham was packed with night owls, all of whom enjoyed an evening on Saturday 19th September.

There were long lines where security had to step in and ask people to make more space as there was no social distancing. Police and community security patrolled.

There were long lines for security to step in and tell people to make more space as there was no social distancing. Police and community security patrolled.

Party animals in Nottingham appeared to be shaking off concerns about the coronavirus and social distancing as they gathered for one night on Saturday.

Party animals in Nottingham appeared to be shaking off concerns about the coronavirus and social distancing as they gathered for an evening on Saturday.

Covid sufferers could be fined up to £ 10,000 for leaving their home for self-isolating under the draconian new rules introduced by Boris Johnson. Pictured: People visit Stables Market in Camden, London earlier today

Covid sufferers could be fined up to £ 10,000 for leaving their home for self-isolating under the draconian new rules introduced by Boris Johnson. Pictured: People visit Stables Market in Camden, London earlier today

The prime minister announced that he would create a new legal obligation for people to self-isolate if they test positive for the virus. In the picture: people who used to wander through the stable market today

The prime minister announced that he would introduce a new legal obligation for people to self-isolate if they test positive for the virus. In the picture: people who used to wander through the stable market today

A sharp rise in the number of cases in recent weeks has raised the alarm on Downing Street. Pictured: Prime Minister Boris Johnson

A sharp rise in the number of cases in recent weeks has raised the alarm on Downing Street. Pictured: Prime Minister Boris Johnson

However, the fines for those who break the rules, which go into effect for a week tomorrow, start at £ 1,000. They rise to £ 10,000 for repeat offenders and “the most egregious violations”, which includes entrepreneurs threatening self-isolating workers with dismissal if they do not come to work.

A sharp increase in the number of cases over the past few weeks has raised the alarm on Downing Street. The government's scientific advisors pushed for a second lockout. However, the ministers led by Chancellor Rishi Sunak warn of the devastating economic effects.

A # 10 source admitted last night, "It doesn't look good."

In a carefully choreographed move, counselors, including Chief Medical Officer Chris Whitty, are expected to release data showing the surge in cases at a public event tomorrow.

Mr Johnson could then appear on TV Tuesday to set out new measures.

The extent and duration of the new rules are still being debated by ministers, but are likely to include a nationwide curfew on pubs and a ban on household mixing.

The development came as:

  • The number of daily cases reached 4,422, the highest since early May. Scientists fear the infections are increasing between two and seven percent daily, with the national R-rate between 1.1 and 1.4.
  • Sources said Mr Whitty was on "resignation watch" because of fears that he might quit if ministers resist his demands for stricter restrictions – but Mr Johnson is said to be in Whitty's "grip";
  • Online delivery places ran out in supermarkets as the specter of a second national lockdown sparked panic buying fears when Morrisons cut shoppers in its 500 supermarkets for the first time since the peak of the pandemic in March.
  • Hospitality leaders have warned of an "economic disaster" following a second lockdown, with one in five of their venues – up to a third in London – still closed and 900,000 on the Treasury Department's vacation program, which expires at the end of October.
  • No. 10 responded angrily to a "brutal and personal" report in the Times alleging that Mr. Johnson was miserable and low on money.
  • Mr Sunak called for tough measures to rebalance the Treasury Department's books after the Covid crisis, including a freeze on public sector benefits and wages, as officials dubbed Mr Johnson's plan for mass testing "Operation Moonshot" as "Operation Moonf *** "mocked. ;;
  • Anti-vaccine protesters clashed with police in London; resulting in 32 arrests;
  • A third of the people reported to have died of Covid in July and August may have died of other reasons, researchers at Oxford University suggested.
  • The British Medical Association urged the government to consider further tightened rules on who can meet as the number of daily cases increases.

Under a 'carrot-and-stick' approach, 4 million low-income people unable to work from home will receive a flat rate of £ 500 if they are forced to self-isolate. Pictured: People are sitting on a terrace today enjoying the weather in London

Under a 'carrot-stick' approach, 4 million low-income people who cannot work from home will receive a flat rate of £ 500 if they are forced to self-isolate. Pictured: People are sitting on a terrace today enjoying the weather in London

The Prime Minister said last night: "The best way to fight this virus is for everyone to follow the rules and isolate themselves if they are at risk of passing on the coronavirus." And so nobody underestimates how important this is. New regulations mean you are legally required to do so if you have the virus or have been told to by NHS Test and Trace.

“People who ignore the rules are fined heavily. We must do everything we can to control the spread of this virus, to prevent the most vulnerable people from becoming infected, and to protect the NHS and save lives. "

Under the new rules, Test and Trace's call handlers will contact the self-isolating people on a regular basis and refer suspected violations of the rules to local authorities and the police.

However, a government adviser, Professor Robert Dingwall, argued that it would be premature to reintroduce stricter measures, especially as existing rules have become "unenforceable" because people do not accept the spirit of the restrictions.

Under the new rules, Test and Trace's call handlers will contact the self-isolating people on a regular basis and refer suspected violations of the rules to the local authorities and the police. Pictured: The public is seated outside a coffee shop in South West London today

Under the new rules, Test and Trace's call handlers will contact the self-isolating people on a regular basis and refer suspected violations of the rules to the local authorities and the police. Pictured: The public is seated outside a coffee shop in South West London today

The people of southwest London took advantage of the good weather today to visit cafes and sit outside in the sun

The people of southwest London took advantage of the good weather today to visit cafes and sit outside in the sun

"Some of the scientific advisors feel that the government might jump the gun," he said.

"It is a little premature to say that we are on this exponential growth curve when we may just be moving to a stable situation at a slightly higher level than what you would expect with the reopening of the economy." ;

Prof. Dingwall also asked if “we are approaching a situation where people are fairly satisfied with the idea that 20,000 people will die from Covid every year, as we are satisfied with the idea that 20,000 people will die every year Influenza will die. And we shrug our shoulders and move on with our lives.

"We need to have more of a national conversation based on the lives of ordinary people and what can be achieved in practice and what the cost of these measures are."