ENTERTAINMENT

Boris Johnson plans a post-Brexit rebound for UK shipbuilding as part of the defense review


Boris Johnson plans a post-Brexit boost to UK shipbuilding as part of the defense review

  • The Defense Review is set to change the rules for awarding contracts to UK firms
  • Currently, EU regulations require international competitions for contracts
  • These restrictions could be lifted by 2023
  • Ministers have hinted at a new £ 1.5 billion deal to build Royal Navy supply ships

British shipbuilders will see an upswing post-Brexit after plans under review by Boris Johnson's defense review, it was alleged last night.

The review will consider amending EU-derived rules that prevent the UK from giving priority to UK companies when awarding contracts.

Currently, the EU Defense and Security Public Procurement Regulation (DSPCR) requires the government to hold international competitions for contracts related to “non-sensitive” defense shipbuilding.

"Sensitive" ships such as submarines and some classes of warships are excluded.

A new defense review under Prime Minister Boris Johnson (pictured) is set to consider amending EU-derived rules preventing the UK from giving British companies priority when it comes to procurement

But the Telegraph reported last night that Mr Johnson's review is considering reforms to the regulations, including the possibility of new laws to relax those rules as early as 2023.

Last month, both Prime Minister and Defense Secretary Ben Wallace hinted that a new £ 1.5 billion contract to build Royal Navy supply vessels would remain in the UK.

Three auxiliary ships should be advertised as they were not previously classified as warships.

Both Prime Minister and Defense Secretary Ben Wallace have hinted that a new £ 1.5 billion contract for the construction of Royal Navy supply ships would remain in the UK (Photo: File photo of the Royal Navy Type 45 destroyer, & # 39; HMS Duncan & # 39; which will be launched in the Scottish Govan shipyard)

Both Prime Minister and Defense Secretary Ben Wallace have hinted that a new £ 1.5 billion contract for the construction of Royal Navy supply ships would remain in the UK (Photo: File photo of the Royal Navy Type 45 destroyer, & # 39; HMS Duncan & # 39; which will be launched in the Scottish Govan shipyard)

However, a few weeks ago Mr Wallace informed the Commons that the ships were warships and highlighted the possibility that they would be built in Britain.

In a statement, the Department of Defense said: “The defense is committed to supporting the government's ambitions to revive UK shipbuilding.

"Towards the end of the transition period, the Department of Defense is looking at ways to better tailor the regulations to our needs, even though no decisions have been made yet."

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