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Boris Johnson offers a fully funded college course to every adult in England without a high school diploma


Boris Johnson will use a speech to promise guaranteed lifelong learning opportunities to help post pandemic job recovery.

Chancellor Rishi Sunak admitted last week when he unveiled his job support plan after the vacation program ends next month that not every job can be saved after Covid-19 weighs on the economy. viable employment.

However, the prime minister will use a speech on Tuesday to outline his intention to create conditions under which people can hone their skills at any stage of their lives in order to help those laid off retrain for new positions.

Boris Johnson, pictured on the construction site of the new vaccine manufacturing and innovation center near Didcot, is expected to announce £ 2.5 billion to help those affected by the Covid Lockdown train or retraining in key occupations like construction and plumbing to help

He is also expected to announce that workers who lose their jobs due to Covid's lockdown will be offered training in building contractors, plumbers and other "essential professions," according to the Telegraph.

Mr Johnson plans to say, “As the Chancellor said, unfortunately we cannot save every job.

“We can give people the skills to find and create new and better jobs.

"So my message today is that this government will help you acquire the skills you need at every stage of your life."

According to Downing Street, adults with no A-level or equivalent qualifications are offered a free, fully funded college course to teach them "skills valued by employers".

They also get the opportunity to study at a time and place that suits them.

This offer will be available in England from April and will be paid for through the National Skills Fund, which will be topped up with an additional £ 2.5 billion.

A full list of available courses will be posted next month, number 10 confirmed.

The government is also allocating £ 8 million for digital skills boot camps. Starting next year, bootcamps will expand to sectors like construction and engineering, which she hopes will help the country rebuild better.

Earlier this year, the government launched their free online skills toolkit, which can be used to train people in digital and numerical skills.

This is being expanded today to include 62 additional courses.

The Prime Minister is expected to add, "We are changing the fundamentals of the qualification system so that everyone can train and retrain."

As part of the measures, the government plans to make loans for higher education more flexible so that adults and young people can spread their studies over their entire lifetime, rather than doing everything in three- to four-year intensive blocks.

Ministers believe the restructuring will allow prospective students to take higher quality professional courses in secondary schools and universities while people can train for the 'jobs of the future'.

The government is also expected to announce an increase in training opportunities with more funding for small business training and more flexible training to be structured

The government is also expected to announce an increase in training opportunities with more funding for small business training and more flexible training to be structured

These reforms will be backed by continued investment in college buildings and facilities, with more than £ 1.5 billion earmarked for capital funding, said No. 10.

Training opportunities will also be increased under the Prime Minister's plan and more resources will be made available for small and medium-sized enterprises that are hiring apprentices.

The government will allow greater flexibility in structuring their training, especially in sectors such as construction and creative industries.

In 2000, over 100,000 people took higher national certificates and diplomas, but that has now dropped to less than 35,000. Those who graduate from elementary school have dropped from 81,000 to 30,000.

As a result, only 10% of adults have a higher technical qualification than the highest qualification, compared with 20% in Germany and 34% in Canada.

This is despite the fact that five years after graduation, the average senior technical apprentice earns more than the average graduate, the government says.

Because of this, Boris Johnson is expected to announce plans to make higher education more flexible to facilitate lifelong learning.

The unemployment rate rose from 3.9 percent to 4.1 percent in the quarter ended July - the highest in two years, according to the latest official data

The unemployment rate rose from 3.9 percent to 4.1 percent in the quarter through July – the highest in two years, according to the latest official data

According to the Office for National Statistics (ONS), the number of employees had fallen by 36,000 in August compared with July. It's now 695,000 lower than it was in March

According to the Office for National Statistics (ONS), the number of employees had fallen by 36,000 in August compared with July. It's now 695,000 lower than it was in March

The program aims to make it easier for adults and young people to divide their studies into segments, transfer credits between colleges and universities, and enable more part-time study.

This new regulation will allow funding for short-term studies instead of having to study in blocks of three or four years.

The unemployment rate rose from 3.9 percent to 4.1 percent in the quarter through July – the first time since the pandemic and the highest in two years. A total of 1.4 million were unemployed, an increase of 62,000.

The estimated increase in the rate for July alone was even higher at 0.5 percent, according to the latest official data.

According to the Office for National Statistics (ONS), the number of employees had fallen by 36,000 in August compared with July. It's now 695,000 lower than it was in March.

The Budgetary Responsibility Office has announced that the unemployment rate could peak between 9.7% and 13.2% in the next few years.

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