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Boris Johnson faces growing rebellion as up to 50 Tory MPs and a minister oppose the lockdown


More than 40 Tory lockdown rebels tonight backed a plan to force Boris Johnson to give parliament the final say on new coronavirus laws.

Ex-ministers, hardcore Brexiters, party moderators and new Red Wall MPs are among those who support Sir Graham Brady's push to hold ministers accountable to the Commons.

MPs will vote next week on extending the emergency powers so that Mr Johnson's administration can take action to shut down part or all of England.

But he faces the struggle to get the biannual update of the emergency powers behind the Commons.

Former Brexit Secretary David Davis, ex-Tory leader Ian Duncan Smith, and Labor MPs including Harriet Harman support the amendment by Sir Graham, chairman of the powerful 1922 committee.

They are joined by former ministers Steve Baker, Julian Lewis and Damian Green as well as newcomer Dehenna Davison from the Red Wall.

In addition to the Tories, the signatories include the DUP MP, Sammy Wilson, and John Spellar from Labor.

The roughly 40 Tories, together with opposition parties, would wipe out Mr Johnson's 80-strong majority in the House of Commons.

Huw Merriman, chairman of the Transportation Committee, tweeted, “I added my name because decisions that affect life chances and livelihoods are better made when they are screened and stress tested.

"Good for cohesion when the MPs directly approve and have the measures that the government must take."

Sir Graham Brady

Concern is growing on the Tory benches over the evidence heralding a return of Mr Johnson (left) Tuesday, which is measured like a curfew for pubs and restaurants at 10 p.m. A change (below) proposed by Tory backbench leader Sir Graham Brady (right) would give MPs a say in blocking legislation

A small number of commuters at Waterloo Station in London in the middle of rush hour Thursday after the Prime Minister announced a series of new restrictions to combat the surge in coronavirus cases in England

A small number of commuters at Waterloo Station in London in the middle of rush hour Thursday after the Prime Minister announced a series of new restrictions to combat the surge in coronavirus cases in England

Concern is growing on the Tory benches over the evidence that announced Mr Johnson's return Tuesday, which is measured like a curfew for pubs and restaurants at 10 p.m.

They fear for the effects on an economy that is already below the waterline.

Today's reports suggest that Sir Graham's amendment may have been brought up by spokesman Lindsay Hoyle because it was legally binding.

However, bipartisan support will make it difficult for the speaker not to allow him to be put to the vote.

Sir Graham told MailOnline today that he hoped the substantial support for his amendment would be "persuasive" to put before MEPs.

He added that he had "encouraging talks" with the government about the concerns it addressed, adding, "I am very confident that they will and that it will not need to be put to the vote."

MPs will debate lockdown powers for a full day on Monday, but Sir Graham said the way the hybrid House of Commons works under social distancing and shielding measures is limiting Tory MPs' ability to raise concerns about the legislation.

"One of the problems is the way the House of Commons is still not allowed to function properly," he said.

“You have a very limited number of Conservative MPs in the Chamber, no more than 25 or 26 I believe. They are all people who happened to show up on a poll to ask a question.

“It really limits people's ability to raise concerns. You have a colleague who is very concerned about what these things will mean for local businesses who doesn't come to a vote on all sorts of statements and questions for two weeks.

"I think that's one of the reasons I think colleagues are frustrated."

Experts have warned that the UK will face "massive tax hikes" by the middle of the decade to help fund the coronavirus crisis as Rishi Sunak prepares to unveil plans today to replace vacation and stave off massive winter job losses.

The Federal Chancellor will announce his new winter management plan at lunchtime. A wage subsidy system that the government will use to top up the wages of people who can only work part-time is expected to be at the core.

Mr. Sunak's multi-billion dollar support package is also likely to include further VAT cuts and the expansion of emergency loan programs for businesses in difficulty.

The shutdown of the government's vacation program in late October has led to dire warnings of waves of layoffs at the Treasury Department in the coming months as firepower is aimed more at saving viable jobs than at zombie jobs with no future.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock told BBC Radio 4's Today program that the government would "use the absolute maximum economic support," but acknowledged that it could not save every job or business.

When asked why Prime Minister Boris Johnson had suggested that there might be a six month deadline for restrictions, Hancock said, “I think it's really important to equate with the people. I think it is really important for us in government to lead people through this very difficult time and be clear with people what we see as the problems and schedule ahead.

“We want to give hope with what is coming – you know what, we can get through it – of course we do. But we also need this hope to be based on realism, because if it is not based on realism, then it is they don't you. & # 39;

Mr Hancock said he wouldn't rule anything out if asked if students at universities suffering from outbreaks were instructed not to go home for Christmas.

"I don't want to have a situation like this and I really hope we can avoid it," he said.

When asked if this would be considered, he said, “I've learned not to rule things out. And one of the challenges we have is making sure people are as safe as possible, and that includes making sure they don't spread between generations, but … that's not our goal. & # 39;

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