ENTERTAINMENT

Boris Johnson faces a collision course with defiant unions as he starts the commute to work


Boris Johnson was on a collision course with the unions last night when he prepared a new push next week to get all officials back to their desks to "set an example".

Downing Street sources said the prime minister is determined to get "any" official back to demonstrate a safe return to work is possible.

However, the unions have warned that any attempt to force officials to return could lead to "industrial unrest".

The UK human rights ombudsman also signaled its opposition, saying the country has shown it can "work flexibly" and "we cannot go back now".

The prime minister ordered departments to work out plans for a gradual return to work in July after at least 95 percent of respondents were home after months of lockdown. However, a Downing Street source admitted that progress was "slow".

They said, “You will see a firmer direction to Whitehall to get back to the office next week. The Prime Minister is very keen to get more people back to work.

Downing Street sources said the prime minister is determined to get "any" official back to demonstrate a safe return to work is possible

Nine out of ten employees who worked from home during the lockdown say they want to continue in some way, according to research

According to a study, nine in ten employees who worked from home during the lockdown want to continue in some form.

Forty percent said they did as much as they did in their office. And more than a quarter expect that they actually did more work at home.

However, three in ten believe their productivity has fallen, researchers from Cardiff University and the University of Southampton found.

The report – Homework in the UK: Before and During the 2020 Lockdown – interviewed a sample of 6,000 to 7,000 workers. It is believed to be the first to analyze the data.

It found that working from home had increased from 6 percent of the workforce before the pandemic started to 43 percent in April.

Cardiff University Professor Alan Felstead said, "Employee flexibility in relation to their workplace could be extremely beneficial for companies."

He said the results indicated that there could be a "big shift" from the traditional workplace.

“The main focus must be that every officer comes back to his desk. It gives the rest of the country an example and shows that it can be safely done.

& # 39; The process has started but it has been slow. It is speeding up now as this is a priority for the Prime Minister. "

The move is seen as an exchange of blows for Health Secretary Matt Hancock, who broke with the government's position this week by saying he was glad his officials could continue to work from home as long as they could work effectively.

Official numbers are unavailable for officials who have so far returned to work, but insiders believe it could be as low as 10 percent.

Transportation Secretary Grant Shapps asked questions to his officials yesterday but hoped the number would climb to 20 percent next week.

Ministers face an argument with unions over kickback to work.

FDA's Dave Penman, who represents senior officials, said, “Ministers are increasingly sounding like dinosaurs.

“Millions of workers are very successful at working from home while employers are realizing that the world of work has changed and embracing it.

"The genie doesn't fit back in the bottle – best not try."

The Union for Public and Commercial Services, the largest in the public service, previously warned that any offer to get civil servants back to work could lead to "industrial unrest".

Secretary General Mark Serwotka has written to the government stating that it may be illegal to move employees from one job to another that is less safe.

A union official predicted that despite the No. 10 tough line, departments would not get most of the workers back this year, adding, “We know there is pressure.

Secretary General Mark Serwotka has written to the government stating that it may be illegal to move employees from one job to another that is less safe

Secretary General Mark Serwotka has written to the government stating that it may be illegal to move employees from one job to another that is less safe

Taxi bosses are warning the industry of an economic disaster

Taxi bosses said yesterday the industry is facing economic disaster as drivers only hit 10 percent of the levels before the lockdown.

And industry leaders warned thousands of drivers about losing their jobs.

Demand for taxis to airports, one of the biggest earners from drivers, has plummeted after the vacation was canceled.

Bosses said abandoned offices also fueled the crisis. Insiders said the tariffs had dropped by up to 90 percent. Steve McNamara of the Licensed Taxi Drivers' Association said, "There are still few tariffs for taxi drivers who are back to work – about 10 to 20 percent of what they had before Covid-19."

Some bosses accused the government of neglecting the industry by not helping drivers customize their cars to limit the spread of the virus. However, the Ministry of Transport has made a commitment to ensure the safety of drivers and passengers, which is why it encouraged passengers to wear face covers while driving.

"We saw a change in tone. But a lot of departments were pretty sure – regardless of politics, they won't see people returning to offices that aren't Covid-safe. They definitely won't be coming back this year."

Ministers yesterday had a backlash over reports that a government advertising campaign was warning workers that if they did not return to the office, they could lose their jobs.

No10 distanced itself from the suggestion that the campaign would suggest that people who work from home are risking the sack, saying it was "deeply irresponsible".

Sources said the campaign will include ads in local newspapers next week urging employers to make sure workplaces are Covid-safe and encourage people to consider returning.

However, a minister told The Daily Telegraph that those who work from home could be "more vulnerable" to any business restructuring.

The Gender Equality and Human Rights Commission said there should be "no question of putting people's jobs at risk if they don't return to the office".

Interim Chair Caroline Waters said: "Having seen how it is possible to be flexible and maintain productivity, we cannot go back now."

Scottish Prime Minister Nicola Sturgeon said she would not "intimidate" people again.

The Labor-led Welsh government said yesterday it would continue to advise people to work from home "where possible".

"Play your part in saving the city centers," the council presidents are asked to say that up to eight in ten workers are not expected to return until next year

By David Churchill

City halls were urged to play their part last night by bringing more workers back to the offices in an attempt to save downtown shops.

A daily mail check of the councils shows that only a fraction of the employees have returned.

Many said up to eight in ten workers won't return until next year or by the end of the pandemic.

Few said they were planning a trip to get them back in the coming weeks.

We sent the survey to more than 80 councils. Of the 25 respondents, 21 said either only a fraction or less than 20 percent of office workers had returned.

Cambridgeshire County Council in Cambridge said about 3,000 of its 4,300 employees work in the office. Around 80 percent of them continue to work from home

Cambridgeshire County Council in Cambridge said about 3,000 of its 4,300 employees work in the office. Around 80 percent of them continue to work from home

Nottinghamshire County Council in Nottingham has 8,000 to 10,000 workers. It said, "The majority of our office workers will stay at home."

Nottinghamshire County Council in Nottingham has 8,000 to 10,000 workers. It said, "The majority of our office workers will stay at home."

Some claimed no more than a fifth will return until the pandemic is over due to distance restrictions.

Critics disapproved, however, accusing the unions of making public sector leaders overly cautious.

In some areas, local authorities are among the largest employers.

CBI chief Dame Carolyn Fairbairn has warned Mr Johnson that he must do more to get workers back to their desks

CBI chief Dame Carolyn Fairbairn has warned Mr Johnson that he must do more to get workers back to their desks

Your people are vital to businesses that rely on busy offices.

Last night's results prompted renewed calls to Downing Street to tighten the “back to work” message.

Former Tory leader Sir Iain Duncan Smith said: “Officials must lead the way and play their part.

Then the government can tell all companies that have said no one will return until the new year that they have an obligation and obligation to help the economy.

"If people don't return to their offices, smaller businesses will crash and burn." Some of these people have likely been to pubs and restaurants as part of the Eat Out to Help Out program. Why can't you repeat that in your office environment? "

He also accused the unions of scaring public sector leaders. He said, “The 20 percent thing is just b *******. They are just trying to harm the government. "

It's been almost a month since Boris Johnson announced August 3rd, when the day ends when work will be done from home.

He said the British could return to their offices at the "discretion" of their employers.

But the response from town halls is another hammer blow for commercial centers suffering from customer shortages.

London City Hall normally has 800 employees at its Thames headquarters, but sources say only a "limited number" are back.

A spokesman for Mayor Sadiq Khan said: "According to the guidelines, only around 200 employees can work safely from the building."

Kent County Council at Maidstone said it had "around 6,500 employees accessing remote technology, which is the vast majority of our employees in the office".

Kent County Council at Maidstone said it had "around 6,500 employees accessing remote technology, which is the vast majority of our employees in the office".

Kent County Council at Maidstone said it had "around 6,500 employees accessing remote technology, which is the vast majority of our employees in the office".

A spokesperson added, "We don't expect employees who normally work in the office to return permanently until next year unless they have to do business."

Cambridgeshire County Council in Cambridge said about 3,000 of its 4,300 employees work in the office. Around 80 percent of them continue to work from home.

It is said they would only let about 20 percent return if distancing guidelines are to be followed.

Suffolk County Council in Ipswich has around 2,800 office workers but said only a fraction are back.

Suffolk County Council in Ipswich has around 2,800 office workers but said only a fraction are back

Suffolk County Council in Ipswich has around 2,800 office workers but said only a fraction are back

A spokesman said: "Our policy is if it works at home, keep doing it."

Nottinghamshire County Council in Nottingham has 8,000 to 10,000 workers. It says: "The majority of our office workers will stay at home."

Exeter-based Devon County Council said office workers "are not expected to return unless they have to".

Similarly, the Cumbria County Council in Carlisle, the Somerset County Council in Taunton, the Hertfordshire County Council in Hertford and councilors such as Peterborough, Coventry and Barnsley.

This week's numbers show that only around 17 percent of employees in the 63 largest cities are back to work.

CBI chief Dame Carolyn Fairbairn has warned Mr Johnson that he must do more to get workers back to their desks. On Thursday, she wrote in the Mail: "The cost of closing offices is becoming clearer day by day."

There are more than 340 councils in England that employ hundreds of thousands of people.

Only 5% of workers have returned to Business Secretary Alok Sharma's office despite calling for companies to get workers back to their desks

From Jim Norton

Economic Secretary Alok Sharma led calls this week urging companies to get workers back to their desks.

But he was charged with hypocrisy last night after only 5 percent of 1,800 employees in his own department arrived at London headquarters.

Only 95 were seen entering the Whitehall building Thursday morning despite the government urging the country – and its own 430,000 workers – to return to their desks.

Earlier this week, Mr. Sharma said, “If you have to come in, you should. I hope we will see people return to work and yes, personally I would like to see London come alive again. "

Economic Secretary Alok Sharma led calls this week urging companies to get workers back to their desks. But he was charged with hypocrisy last night after only 5 percent of 1,800 employees in his own department arrived at London headquarters

Economic Secretary Alok Sharma led calls this week urging companies to get workers back to their desks. But he was charged with hypocrisy last night after only 5 percent of 1,800 employees in his own department arrived at London headquarters

Last night, former Tory leader Sir Iain Duncan Smith said Mr. Sharma should heed the saying “Doctor, cure yourself”, adding, “The government is in control of the departments. There is one very strong case that you should tell officials, "You have to come back". It's safe and there is no excuse. "

The Mail has been monitoring the number of employees who will be working in multiple Whitehall departments between 7:15 a.m. and 11:00 a.m. over the past month.

Only 39 joined the Department of Labor and Pensions on Wednesday, 18 less than two weeks ago, making up just over 2 percent of the 1,700 who worked there before the lockdown.

There were still few changes in the Ministry of Education. Only 3 percent of the employees showed up on Wednesday.

His boss Gavin Williamson was among 64 people who entered – an increase of only two in a fortnight.

A recent email poll found that 51 percent of Britons believed civil servants should set an example for the country.

There were still few changes in the Ministry of Education. Only 3 percent of the employees showed up on Wednesday. His boss Gavin Williamson (pictured) was among 64 people who entered - an increase from just two in a fortnight.

There were still few changes in the Ministry of Education. Only 3 percent of the employees showed up on Wednesday. His boss Gavin Williamson (pictured) was among 64 people who entered – an increase from just two in a fortnight.

Visitor numbers in other Whitehall departments remain low, but the number of returnees is slowly increasing. The biggest increase was in the office, which employed more than 2,200 people from the Treasury and Digital, Culture, Media and Sports departments, where 227 out of 178 had signed up two weeks ago.

Meanwhile, 238 employees arrived at the main entrance to the home office headquarters – up from 198.

Former Trade Secretary Sir Vince Cable urged the Department of Mr. Sharma to "lead by example".

A government spokesman said, "It is safe to return to a Covid-safe workplace and government departments have ensured that appropriate measures are in place to allow as many officials as possible to return safely."

Transport Secretary Grant Shapps was also accused of hypocrisy yesterday after urging the British to get back to work.

When an interviewer pointed out that he was still at his Hertfordshire home, Mr Shapps said he was "ad hoc" commuting to the Department of Transportation.

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