ENTERTAINMENT

Boris Johnson announces the ban on the sale of gasoline and diesel cars in 2030


Boris Johnson will announce today that sales of new gasoline and diesel cars will be banned in 2030.

He paves the way for a revolution in electric vehicles and will unveil a ten-point plan for the environment worth £ 12 billion.

It includes further investments in nuclear energy, wind energy, household heating and cutting edge technology such as carbon capture and storage.

The petrol and diesel ban is due to begin in nine years – a decade earlier than originally planned.

The prime minister will usher in a "green industrial revolution" that could create 250,000 jobs and cut the country's carbon emissions.

However, since electric vehicles cost far more than traditional models, the plan could hit the poor.

Boris Johnson will announce today that sales of new gasoline and diesel cars will be banned in 2030

A leading economist warned the move would put £ 40 billion road taxes at risk as electric vehicles are exempt from the tax.

"Some form of toll will be required," said Paul Johnson of the Institute for Fiscal Studies.

"The government has to start now – it will be very difficult to put it in place after people get used to no taxes."

RAC's Nicholas Lyes warned that given their limited range and charging issues, many motorists would be nervous about switching to electric cars.

He urged ministers to revive the discount schemes for buyers, saying the biggest obstacle by far was the high upfront costs.

The EV push will come with a £ 1.3 billion investment in charging points in homes, streets and highways.

He paves the way for a revolution in electric vehicles and will unveil a ten-point plan for the environment worth £ 12 billion.

He paves the way for a revolution in electric vehicles and will unveil a ten-point plan for the environment worth £ 12 billion.

The Prime Minister will today:

  • Unveiled ambitious proposals to increase hydrogen production in hopes of heating an entire city with low-carbon fuel by the end of the decade;
  • Promise to invest in small nuclear reactors but postpone decision on Sizewell in Suffolk;

10-point plan at a glance

ELECTRIC VEHICLES

Prohibition of new sales of gasoline and diesel cars by 2030. Investment in battery technology and introduction of charging stations for electric cars.

OFFSHORE WIND

Install thousands of offshore turbines to produce enough energy to power every home by 2030.

HYDROGEN

Working with industry to produce five gigawatts of the low-carbon fuel by 2030.

core

Investment in new technologies to develop mini-reactors. The decision on large new power plants like Sizewell in Suffolk is pending.

PUBLIC TRANSPORT

Cycling and walking: £ 5 billion investment in low carbon transport, with cycle paths expected to benefit from £ 2 billion.

JET ZERO

Supported the development of the world's first commercial zero carbon aircraft.

HOUSES AND BUILDINGS

Homes, schools and hospitals are becoming greener and warmer, with improved insulation and heat pumps to replace traditional boilers.

CARBON CAPTURE

World market leader in technology for capturing and storing harmful emissions.

NATURE

Protecting and restoring the natural environment, including planting 75,000 acres of trees per year.

INNOVATION & FINANCE

Develop new green technologies and make the city the global center for green finance.

  • Plans to install 600,000 household heat pump systems per year by 2028;
  • Vow to make the UK a world leader in carbon capture and storage technology;
  • Approval of plans to invest £ 5 billion in buses, cycling and walking – with new cycle paths to be shared from £ 2 billion fund;
  • Promise to improve the natural environment with 75,000 acres of tree plantings annually;
  • Confirm plans to build thousands of wind turbines.

The UK has a legal goal of reducing greenhouse gases to zero by 2050. This requires huge emissions reductions, and the remaining pollution from sectors such as aviation must be “offset” by measures such as tree planting.

There is also pressure to take ambitious action to tackle the climate crisis as the UK is set to host a United Nations Environment Summit, delayed by the pandemic and now taking place in Glasgow in November 2021.

The prime minister has a longstanding passion for green issues and has been encouraged by his environmental activist fiancée Carrie Symonds to continue pushing the government in that direction.

Mr Johnson, who drove a 15-year-old diesel car before entering government, will say, “Although this year has taken a very different path than we expected, I haven't lost sight of our ambitious plans to improve the country .

“My ten-point plan will create, support and protect hundreds of thousands of green jobs and make progress towards net zero by 2050.

& # 39; Our green industrial revolution is powered by the wind turbines of Scotland and the North East, powered by the electric vehicles made in the Midlands and powered by the latest technologies developed in Wales, so we can look to a more prosperous and greener future. & # 39;

The plan is to push the ban on new conventional cars and vans by a decade from the planned date of 2040.

Some hybrid vehicles are allowed to sell until 2035.

Government sources stressed last night that motorists could still drive older conventional cars after that point, although the auto industry has raised concerns about the potential impact on the used car market.

Nearly £ 500 million will be spent developing and mass producing batteries for electric vehicles over the next four years to bolster the manufacturing base, including in the Midlands and Northeast.

The government will also launch a consultation on phasing out new diesel trucks to rehabilitate freight traffic, although a date has not yet been set.

AA President Edmund King said the 2030 date was "incredibly ambitious".

The petrol and diesel ban is due to begin in nine years - a decade earlier than originally planned

The petrol and diesel ban is due to begin in nine years – a decade earlier than originally planned

The plan calls for the ban on new conventional cars and delivery vans to be brought forward by a decade from the planned 2040 date

He added that the electric revolution could flourish if steps were taken to address concerns about electric vehicles such as cost, range fears and the charging system.

"One of the biggest challenges for automakers will be transforming more than 100 years of internal combustion engine production to create an electric future within a decade," he said.

Rebecca Newsom of Greenpeace UK said this was a landmark announcement and "a turning point for climate action".

She warned that switching to electric vehicles was not a panacea, but admitted it could get the government back on track to meet its climate change commitments.

Only one percent of the world's population is responsible for up to HALF the harmful carbon emissions caused by air travel, according to the study

By Victoria Allen, science correspondent for the Daily Mail

According to one study, just one percent of the world's population is responsible for up to half of the harmful carbon emissions caused by traveling by air.

Researchers estimated that only 11 percent of the world's people got on a plane in 2018, based on passenger data.

Travel surveys show that up to a quarter of flyers only do this once a year for their annual vacation.

However, about one in ten flies very frequently, while the worst culprits get on a plane almost every day of the year.

According to one study, just one percent of the world's population is responsible for up to half of the harmful carbon emissions caused by traveling by air

According to one study, just one percent of the world's population is responsible for up to half of the harmful carbon emissions caused by traveling by air

Researchers said that these "super emitters" make up only one percent of the world's population, but cause 30 to 50 percent of carbon emissions from aviation.

Professor Stefan Goessling from Linnaeus University in Sweden, who led the study, said: “Some people will cause more carbon emissions in one year than entire African villages or cities.

“It may seem to them that jumping on a plane is not a big deal, but they are doing far more than anyone else so far.

"The fight against climate change must start with these super-emitters."

More than 2.5 billion people – mostly in the US, China and India – flew in their own country in 2018.

The study found that only two to four percent flew abroad.

According to surveys, the most frequent passengers fly up to 300 flights a year.

Professor Goessling said these people travel around 35,000 miles a year – the equivalent of several long-haul flights a year or regular short-haul flights a month.

The study may come as a surprise as it suggests that very few people around the world have the opportunity to fly to more affluent regions like Europe and the US, despite the growth in package tours and low-cost airlines.

Researchers said 59 percent of the UK population does not fly based on 2009 figures. The study was published in the journal Global Environmental Change.

Professor Stefan Goessling from Linnaeus University in Sweden, who led the study, said: “Some people will cause more carbon emissions in one year than entire African villages or cities.

“It may seem to them that jumping on a plane is not a big deal, but they are doing far more than anyone else so far.

"The fight against climate change must start with these super-emitters."

More than 2.5 billion people – mostly in the US, China and India – flew in their own country in 2018.

The study found that only two to four percent flew abroad.

According to surveys, the most frequent passengers fly up to 300 flights a year.

Professor Goessling said these people travel around 35,000 miles a year – the equivalent of several long-haul flights a year or regular short-haul flights a month.

The study may come as a surprise as it suggests that very few people around the world have the opportunity to fly to more affluent regions like Europe and the US, despite the growth in package tours and low-cost airlines.

Researchers said 59 percent of the UK population doesn't fly based on 2009 figures.

The study was published in the journal Global Environmental Change.