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Boris is using the national address to warn of fluctuating fines and more police officers will enforce the loss of liberties


"Six months" curbs at a glance

  • All pubs, bars and restaurants in England are subject to a curfew at 10:00 p.m. on Thursday. The Prime Minister insists that the premises must kick all customers out by the deadline.
  • The hospitality sector will also be limited to table service only, as the government has banned drinkers taking a trip to the bar.
  • All indoor retail workers and customers are required to wear masks – unless they are seated to eat or drink.
  • All employees who can work from home will be asked to do so from tomorrow.
  • The fines for violating the Rule of Six and missing face covering are increased to £ 200 for a first offense.
  • Police will now have the option to call on the military for assistance, with soldiers possibly being drafted to perform official duties and guarding protected locations so that officers have more time to take action against rule violations.
  • The number of people allowed to attend weddings in England will be reduced to 15 from Monday, but the number of people allowed to attend a funeral will remain at 30.
  • Plans for the partial return of sports fans to the stadiums on October 1 have been suspended.
  • The six rule exemption is tightened to ban team sports such as five-on-five football games.

Boris Johnson warned the British tonight of a long, hard winter with police-enforced restrictions on their freedom to fight off the coronavirus, saying the alternative is "many more families lose loved ones before their due dates".

In a dramatic televised address to the nation, the prime minister, flanked by a Union Jack, said he was "deeply mentally reticent" to make new "impositions" or violate a person's freedom after presenting new measures in parliament today.

But he said it was necessary to reintroduce work from home and a range of social measures to avoid a dramatic increase in deaths, overwhelm the NHS and trigger a second, economically devastating total lockdown.

The beleaguered prime minister was shot at from all sides when he turned his urge to reopen the workplaces after just a few weeks.

He also faced barbs for introducing other new measures, including a 10 p.m. curfew in the pub and fines of £ 200 for violating mask rules in England. The army may have been drafted to help police amid a spate of coronavirus infections that swept the country.

But speaking from Downing Street tonight, he warned that "iron laws of geometric progress are yelling at us from the graphics that we risk a lot more deaths, a lot more families lose loved ones before their time".

And tackling his critics – including Tory MPs and business leaders, who warned of the economic ramifications of his activities, he added, "For those who say we don't need this stuff and we should leave people to take risks, I say these risks are not our own.

“The tragic reality with Covid is that your mild cough can be someone else's death knell.

“And as for the suggestion that we should just imprison the elderly and vulnerable – with all the suffering that would come with it – I have to tell you that this is simply not realistic.

"Because if you let the virus get through the rest of the population, it would inevitably get to the elderly, and in much larger numbers."

The prime minister has already warned that the new curbs could last well into 2021, and tonight he warned it could be before mass tests are fully up and a new vaccine is widely available.

He said: "While our doctors and medical advisors are rightly concerned about the dates and the risks in winter, they agree that things will be far better by spring if we don't just have the hope of a vaccine, but also one day – and I have to stress that we are not there yet – mass testing will be done so efficiently that people can be tested in minutes so they can do more of the things they love.

& # 39; That is the hope; This is the dream. It's hard, but it's achievable and we're working as hard as possible to get there. & # 39;

Another dramatic day:

  • Pubs, restaurants and takeaways will be subject to a curfew of 10 p.m. from tomorrow.
  • Shop staff, waiters and bar staff were told that they must wear masks when working. Drinkers and diners are also required to wear face covers when leaving the table.
  • Fines for violating face mask rules and gathering more than six people have been doubled to £ 200. Troops have been put on standby to release the police and step up enforcement.
  • In an extraordinary U-turn, Mr. Johnson dropped a "back to work" push, telling millions of office workers to work from home now through spring.
  • A government move to get Whitehall officials back to their desks was also scrapped less than three weeks after it started.
  • The Prime Minister's hopes for a unified British approach were dashed after Nicola Sturgeon announced an even harsher crackdown in Scotland.
  • It emerged that the Chancellor was working on measures to support the economy when Bank of England Governor Andrew Bailey led calls for "rethinking" about the end of the vacation.
  • Daily cases of Covid rose again to 4,926 – the highest level in four months – with hospital admissions also increasing.
  • The limit for wedding guests will be reduced from 30 to 15 on Monday.
  • Culture Secretary Oliver Dowden held crisis talks with sports associations after plans to test fans' return to the stadiums next month were postponed.
  • The prime minister tried to counter a growing Tory revolt over the measures by promising MPs a greater say in the government's management of the crisis.
  • Andrew Lloyd Webber warned that theaters could not survive without a rescue operation;
  • The Prime Minister suggested that Britain had more problems with Covid than Germany and Italy because it was difficult to convince "freedom-loving" Britons to adhere to restrictions.

In a televised address to the nation, the prime minister said he was "deeply mentally reluctant" to make the changes he unveiled in parliament today

The prime minister said there was a need to reintroduce work from home and a range of social impacts to avoid a dramatic increase in deaths and a second, economically devastating total lockdown

The prime minister said there was a need to reintroduce work from home and a range of social impacts to avoid a dramatic increase in deaths and a second, economically devastating total lockdown

Data from Public Health England shows that of the 729 outbreaks in the week ended September 13, only five percent occurred in grocery stores such as restaurants and pubs

Data from Public Health England shows that of the 729 outbreaks in the week ended September 13, only five percent occurred in grocery stores such as restaurants and pubs

The police blow up the & # 39; absurd & # 39; new rules of the prime minister

Police have ruled Boris Johnson's new coronavirus rules "absurd" and "nonsensical" tonight when small business owners warned that if workers stayed home they would go broke.

The beleaguered prime minister found himself exposed to fire on all sides as he turned his urge to reopen workplaces after just a few weeks to instruct office workers to work from home when they can.

He also faced barbs for introducing new measures, including a 10 p.m. pubs curfew and £ 200 fines for breaching mask rules related to new social restrictions in England.

Mr Johnson warned that the curbs may have to stay in place for six months, which could potentially ruin Christmas and New Years Eve and the total time spent under coronavirus restrictions of some sort could be up to a calendar year.

The Chairman of the Metropolitan Police Federation, Ken Marsh, criticized the move as "nonsense".

He told MailOnline, “If someone sneaks and says that Mr. Big 20 has people in his house, what do we do? Sitting in front of his house all evening waiting for people to come out and count or something?

& # 39; That's an address. We are talking about millions of addresses. It's just nonsense. It is absolutely absurd.

The National Police Federation of England and Wales President John Apter added: “Further funding to monitor this pandemic is urgently needed. The service needs all the help it can get as financial pressures on the armed forces increase day by day – but today's announcement didn't give any details. We'll wait for that before partying too much. & # 39;

He continued, “Never in our history have our collective fate and health depended so completely on our individual behavior.

“If we follow these simple rules together, we will survive this winter together. There are no doubt difficult months ahead. And the fight against Covid is far from over.

“However, I have no doubt that big days are ahead. But now is the time for all of us to invoke the discipline, determination, and togetherness that will get us through. & # 39;

But Mr. Johnson was immediately criticized from his own banks.

Telford MP Lucy Allan asked on Twitter if Britain's “collective health” was at risk.

"Measures to combat #covid must be proportionate to the risk," she wrote.

& # 39; The virus poses a serious threat to certain vulnerable groups. We have to protect these groups with targeted measures. The closure of society is massively damaging the health, life and livelihood of the entire population. "

Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage has blown Mr Johnson's "authoritarian" response to the coronavirus crisis when he lamented, "We didn't vote in favor."

He tweeted angrily, "The Prime Minister says we are a 'freedom loving country' but he will fine you £ 10,000 and send the army in if he wants. That's authoritarian – I don't believe his promises regarding tests or the competence of the government. We did not vote for it. & # 39;

Liberal Democrat leader Ed Davey said: “We all want nothing more than to defeat this terrible virus and get back to normal.

“Unfortunately, today's declaration by the Prime Minister confirms that this is still a long way off and that difficult times are ahead.

"The Prime Minister must take responsibility for what went wrong and apologize for the chaotic failure of his" Weltschlag "test and tracing system. It is inexcusable that this important test and trace operation has been overwhelmed in recent weeks was.

Ministers must provide details of the practical steps they are taking to fix the testing and traceability system as soon as possible. This is the only way to avoid further restrictions.

"With millions of people worried about their jobs, business and livelihoods, the prime minister urgently needs to put in place a new economic plan that includes extending vacation and providing more help to the self-employed and small businesses."

Labor MP Chris Bryant took the Prime Minister's tone and tweeted, “The problem with Johnson is that he can't deliver a tough message. By saying that he hates it, he is effectively undermining what he is doing. And while he was talking about breaking the rules, I was just thinking about (Chief Advisor Dominic) Cummings. & # 39;

The government rushed to defend Mr Cummings after the Prime Minister's chief assistant broke lockdown rules by driving from London to Country Durham and back in April.

Meanwhile, London Mayor Sadiq Khan, who yesterday threatened to force Londoners to wear face masks in all public spaces in the capital, supported the Prime Minister's "early" actions.

He tweeted: "We are now in a critical phase to stop the spread of the coronavirus. Cases are on the rise in the capital and the government has failed to put in place an adequate testing or contact tracing system.

“Londoners must redouble their efforts and follow all the measures laid down. I firmly believe that acting early, rather than taking more stringent action later, is the right thing to do, both for public health and for the economy. & # 39;

And Conservative MP Ben Bradley praised Mr Johnson, saying, “The tone of @BorisJohnson speaks just right tonight. We all need to take responsibility for keeping ourselves and others safe in the weeks ahead.

"It's good to see that the boss looks good again."

The UK recorded another 4,926 cases of coronavirus today, bringing the country's total to over 400,000 confirmed infections as the outbreak continues to grow.

Figures from the Ministry of Health show that an average of 4,189 new Covid-19 infections are registered daily – an increase of 35 percent compared to 3,096 last Tuesday.

In response to the Prime Minister's address, Telford MP Lucy Allan asked on Twitter if Britain's “collective health” was really at risk

In response to the Prime Minister's address, Telford MP Lucy Allan asked on Twitter if Britain's “collective health” was really at risk

In response to the Prime Minister's address, Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage has blown Mr Johnson's "authoritarian" response to the coronavirus crisis

In response to the Prime Minister's address, Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage has blown Mr Johnson's "authoritarian" response to the coronavirus crisis

Labor MP Chris Bryant took the Prime Minister's tone and tweeted, "The problem with Johnson is that he can't deliver a tough message."

Labor MP Chris Bryant took the Prime Minister's tone and tweeted, "The problem with Johnson is that he can't deliver a tough message."

Meanwhile, London Mayor Sadiq Khan, who yesterday threatened to force Londoners to wear face masks in all public spaces in the capital, supported the Prime Minister's "early" actions

Meanwhile, London Mayor Sadiq Khan, who yesterday threatened to force Londoners to wear face masks in all public spaces in the capital, supported the Prime Minister's "early" actions

Conservative MP Ben Bradley praised Mr Johnson's speech, saying, "We all need to take responsibility for ensuring that we and others are safe in the weeks ahead."

Conservative MP Ben Bradley praised Mr Johnson's speech, saying, "We all need to take responsibility for ensuring that we and others are safe in the weeks ahead."

New mask rules in pubs "impossible" for the police

Pub bosses and punters grappling with new coronavirus rules that make masks mandatory have warned Boris Johnson that enforcement will be difficult.

The Prime Minister today tightened restrictions on the hospitality sector for six months by imposing a 10pm curfew across England starting Thursday and restricting business to table service only.

In the House of Commons, he also said that face covering will be mandatory for all employees and customers unless they are seated.

The series of measures was met with an immediate backlash from the pub trade, which said the "devastating" curbs would torpedo sales and sink some companies.

Greg Mulholland, Campaign Manager for Pubs, said: “It seems questionable asking people to wear face masks who are not already at the table and there is a concern that the need for a mask will deter people from going to pubs to go who this might see the trade level drop even further. & # 39;

He called on the government to support pubs financially, adding: “The confirmation of a 10pm curfew and other restrictions for up to six months is devastating for many pubs and customs officers.

"As it is, most of the pubs have only just gotten back on their feet and many have not yet acted profitably. This latest news will make it impossible for some customs officers to continue."

However, it is impossible to compare the cases now recorded with the values ​​of the first wave, as the extent of the crisis at the time was a mystery due to the weak government policies. Top experts believe that more than 100,000 cases occurred every day in March and April.

Another 37 people have died across the UK, officials said today, more than any other day in two months. The 44 announced on July 14th was the last highest number.

Mr Johnson had warned the Commons this afternoon that the curbs may have to stay in place for six months, which may ruin the family Christmas and New Year celebrations and the total time spent under coronavirus restrictions of any kind, up to a calendar year takes.

The 10pm curfew in the hospitality industry sparked an immediate backlash in the industry when the UKHospitality group said it was "another major blow".

Managing Director Kate Nicholls said, "It's hard to understand how these measures are the solution to the disease when government data shows that only five percent of infections outside the home are hospitality-related."

Mr Johnson also told the Commons that all eateries must close at 10 p.m., including takeaway – but confirmed that restaurants and takeaways can deliver groceries to customers outside the curfew.

He said: “As of Thursday, all pubs, bars and restaurants must have a table service that is only expected to be taken away – along with all restaurants they must close at 10 p.m. I'm sorry this will affect many companies that are just getting back on their feet, but we need to act. & # 39;

At the same time, Tory MPs warned that there could be no further "major lockdown". They said the decision to turn off their backs to work will create widespread "dismay" among workers living in "cramped, overcrowded shelters".

They also warned that their constituents would be angry with the new policy after following the government's rules only to see "people protested, at street parties, with no action taken against them".

Meanwhile, Scottish Prime Minister Nicola Sturgeon warned Mr Johnson that his actions did not go far enough as she banned her compatriots from visiting their own homes in an attempt to lower the Covid-19 R rate in Scotland.

Mr Johnson explained to the public the measures that were presented to MPs this afternoon.

“And of course, I am deeply mentally reluctant to make any of these impositions or violate someone's freedom, but if we fail to take action, there is a risk that we will have to take tougher action later when deaths have already increased and we did have a huge amount of infections like we had in the spring, ”he added.

“If we let this virus get out of hand now, it would mean our NHS – once again – had no place to deal with cancer patients and millions of other non-covid medical needs.

“And if we were to be forced into a new national lockdown, it would not only threaten jobs and livelihoods, but also the loving human contact on which we all depend.

“It would mean renewed loneliness and imprisonment for the elderly and vulnerable and ultimately endanger the education of our children again. We must do everything we can to avoid going down this path again.

“But if people don't obey the rules we set, we must reserve the right to go further. We must take action now because one trick in time saves nine; This way we can keep people in work, keep our shops and schools open, and keep our country moving as we work together to quell the virus. & # 39;

Mr Johnson imposed a 10 p.m. curfew on all restaurants, bars and pubs across England from Thursday, with the hospitality sector also limited to table service only.

The requirement to wear face coverings is expanded to include retail workers and customers in indoor hospitality establishments, except when they are at a table to eat or drink.

He also announced the end of the government's return to work when he said he was now urging "office workers who can work from home".

The government has actively encouraged workers to work from home and today's U-turn marks a humiliating rise for the prime minister, who told his cabinet this earlier this month "People in our country are returning to the office in large numbers, and quite rightly."

The decision to push workers to work from home sparked dire warnings about the future of the city and downtown when corporate groups immediately asked the government to extend their vacation program, which is due to be completed in late October.

Mel Stride, Tory chairman of the Commons Treasury Committee, told the Prime Minister that lockdowns "destroy jobs and also personal well-being" when he urged the government to heed business concerns.

Mr Johnson did not announce a ban on mixing households indoors in England, but Nicola Sturgeon followed Northern Ireland this afternoon when she said Scots will no longer be able to meet in other people's homes starting tomorrow, raising questions about which of the home states which has adopted correct approach.

Some experts have already warned that the Prime Minister's curfew is not going far enough after senior scientific adviser Sir Patrick Vallance said yesterday that Britain could suffer 50,000 cases a day through mid-October and more than 200 deaths a day through November, provided Britain does not change course.

Calum Semple, professor of child health and outbreak medicine at the University of Liverpool and member of the government's scientific advisory group on emergencies (Sage), said there were "several areas of society that unfortunately need to tighten their restrictions".

It was alleged overnight that Mr Johnson initially advocated a full shutdown of the hospitality and leisure sectors before Chancellor Rishi Sunak persuaded him to take a less stringent course after warning of economic slaughter.

The revelation of the new restrictions immediately sparked business concerns, fears that they would inevitably lead to more job losses.

CBI Director General Dame Carolyn Fairbairn told the BBC: “There is now an urgent need to have a successor to the vacation program.

& # 39; It was a great success. It has saved thousands and thousands of jobs, but it faces a cliff. And now, with today's announcement, it is more urgent than ever.

& # 39; We call on the Ministry of Finance to announce a successor system very quickly. It should be more targeted. It doesn't have to be that generous. But if we want to protect jobs, this must be done in the medium term within days or weeks. This is urgent now. & # 39;

Ms. Fairbairn also said: "Avoiding the devastating blow cannot be avoided." The new proposals for working from home will bring businesses, especially those in city centers.

Boris Johnson's television address complete

Good evening,

The fight against Covid is the biggest crisis the world has faced in my life.

In less than a year, this disease has killed nearly a million people and devastated economies everywhere.

Here in the UK we mourn everyone we have lost and we mourn with their families.

And yet I am more certain than ever that this is a fight that humanity will win and we in this country will win – and in order to achieve what we have to do, I want to talk to you directly tonight about the decisions talk that we face – none of them simply – and why we need to act now.

I know we can be successful because we did it before.

When the disease hit this country in March, we came together in the spirit of national sacrifice and community. We followed the instructions on the letter. We stayed home protecting the NHS and saving thousands of lives.

And for months now, these social distancing disciplines have kept this virus in check.

But we have to recognize that this is a large and freedom loving country. and while the vast majority obeyed the rules, there have been too many violations – too many opportunities for our invisible enemy to get through undetected.

The virus has started to re-spread exponentially. Infections have increased, hospital admissions are increasing.

We can see what is happening in France and Spain and we unfortunately know that this virus is no less deadly than it was in the spring and that the vast majority of our population is no less vulnerable and the iron laws of geometry advances are screaming us out of the Graphics indicate that we risk many more deaths, many more families losing loved ones before their time; and I know that in the face of this risk, the British people want their government to keep fighting to protect them, you, and we do that day and night. Yet the greatest weapon we bring to this struggle is the common sense of the people themselves – this country's shared determination to work together to quell lust now.

So today I put a package of tougher measures in England – early closings for pubs, bars; table service only; Closure of businesses that are not Covid-safe; Expanded use of face coverings and new fines for those who fail to comply; and re-urging office workers to work from home when possible, while enforcing the six indoor and outdoor rule – a tighter package of national measures coupled with the potential for tighter local restrictions on areas that are already closed are.

I know that this approach – robust but proportionate – is already supported by all major parties in Parliament.

After talking to colleagues in the decentralized administrations, I believe that this broad approach is shared across the UK. And for those of you who say we don't need this stuff and we should let people take their own risks, I say those risks are not our own.

The tragic reality with Covid is that your mild cough can be someone else's death knell.

And as for the suggestion that we should just imprison the elderly and vulnerable – with all the suffering that would entail – I have to tell you that this is just not realistic because if you let the virus penetrate the rest of the population would inevitably find their way to older people, and in much larger numbers.

So now we need to quell the virus, and as for the minority who may continue to break the rules, we will enforce those rules with tougher penalties and fines of up to £ 10,000. We're going to get more cops out on the streets and use the army to replenish if necessary.

And of course, I am deeply mentally reluctant to make any of these impositions or violate anyone's freedom, but if we don't take action, we run the risk of having to take tougher action later when deaths have already risen and we have a huge one Lots of infections like we had in spring.

If we let this virus get out of hand now, it would mean our NHS – once again – had no place to deal with cancer patients and millions of other non-covidial medical needs.

And if we were to be forced into a new national lockdown, it would not only threaten jobs and livelihoods, but also the loving human contact on which we all depend.

This would mean renewed loneliness and imprisonment for the elderly and vulnerable, and ultimately endanger the education of our children again. We must do everything we can to avoid going down this path again.

But if people don't follow the rules we set, we must reserve the right to go further. We must take action now because one trick in time saves nine; This way we can keep people in work, keep our shops and schools open, and keep our country moving as we work together to quell the virus.

That is our strategy and if we can pursue this package together then we will know that we can succeed because we are better prepared than before in many ways.

We have the PPE, we have the beds, we have the nightingales, we have new medicines – pioneers in this country – that can help save lives.

And while our doctors and medical advisors are right now concerned about the dates and the risks over the winter, they agree that things will be far better by spring if we have hope not just of a vaccine, but one One day soon – and I have to stress that we are not there yet – of mass tests that are so efficient that people can be tested in minutes so they can do more of the things they love. That is the hope; This is the dream. It's hard, but it's achievable and we're working as hard as we can to get there.

But until we do that, we have to rely on our willingness to take care of one another and protect one another. Never in our history has our collective fate and health been so completely dependent on our individual behavior.

If we follow these simple rules together, we will survive this winter together. There are no doubt difficult months ahead.

And the fight against Covid is far from over. However, I have no doubt that great days are ahead.

But now is the time for all of us to invoke the discipline, determination, and togetherness that will get us through.

These new rules to the fullest wiping out Christmas and New Years: work from home is back, face masks in pubs and restaurants – and will hairdressers and gyms be included in the rule of six?

Boris Johnson apologetically took a hammer into British social life today as he reinstated lockdown measures in England that should possibly take six months to fend off a second wave of coronavirus.

Pubs and other leisure and hospitality businesses such as restaurants have to expect a curfew from 10 p.m. on Thursday.

People who work in retail stores, travel in taxis, and indoor employees and customers must also wear face-covers – except when they are sitting at a table to eat or drink.

And in a dramatic reversal of recent government efforts to get people back to work, all office workers are advised to work from home as soon as possible, wherever they can.

In a grave Commons statement, the Prime Minister warned that the new curbs could take six months – well beyond Christmas – "unless we make tangible progress".

Here we take a look at the new rules revealed today:

PUBS AND RESTAURANTS

ENGLAND –

From this Thursday pubs and restaurants have to close at 10 p.m. This means that the last orders have to be made some time after 9 p.m.

Customers are not allowed to order drinks at the bar. All pubs and bars are only allowed to be table service, like restaurants.

This is a change from the current rules that allowed people to stand at the bar for a beer as long as there was social distance.

This also applies to takeaway services, many of which businesses have backed through the worst of the original lockdown.

However, deliveries of food (and beverages) are allowed to resume after 10 a.m. as it is easier to limit human contact.

In a grave Commons statement, the Prime Minister warned that the new curbs could take six months - well beyond Christmas - "unless we make tangible progress".

In a grave Commons statement, the Prime Minister warned that the new curbs could take six months – well beyond Christmas – "unless we make tangible progress".

WALES, SCOTLAND AND NORTHERN IRELAND –

The same rules for England are expected to apply in Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. The decentralized administrations will announce their plans this week.

DOES THE 10PM CURFEW DAMAGE ECONOMICALLY?

The prime minister told the Commons that "the disease tends to spread later in the night after more alcohol is consumed".

In response to Meg Hillier, Labor Chair of the Commons Public Accounts Committee, he said, “These are not easy decisions, no one wants to restrict the right of restaurants and other businesses to do their legitimate business.

“What we saw from the evidence is that unfortunately the disease spread later in the night after more alcohol was consumed.

"This is a way to shut down the R without causing undue economic damage, and that's the balance we need to find."

Ministers have been warned that a 10 p.m. curfew in pubs and restaurants will be the final nail in the coffin for many businesses still on the water after the first wave of Covid-19.

Disgruntled hospitality bosses fear that they will bear the brunt of Boris Johnson's crackdown on coronavirus when government figures show comparatively low spread of the disease in food and beverage stores.

Data from Public Health England shows that of the 729 outbreaks in the week leading up to September 13, only five percent occurred in grocery stores such as restaurants and pubs – 45 percent in nursing homes, 21 percent in schools and 18 percent in places of work.

People are sitting in a restaurant in Covent Garden, London today when the Prime Minister curtailed civil liberties

People are sitting in a restaurant in Covent Garden, London today when the Prime Minister curtailed civil liberties

Pubs like the French House in Soho in central London have to close at 10pm. These are not the last orders at 10 p.m., this is at 10 p.m.

Pubs like the French House in Soho in central London have to close at 10pm. These are not the last orders at 10 p.m., this is at 10 p.m.

Tim Martin, founder of Wetherspoons, said: "The curfew won't last a smart person for even five minutes because if you look at the statistics … there are relatively few transmissions of infections in pubs."

The government faced renewed calls for more corporate support and the hospitality industry warned that the new restrictions would be a "major blow".

Kate Nicholls, chief executive of trade organization UKHospitality, said, "It's hard to understand how these measures are the solution to the disease when government data shows that only 5 percent of infections outside the home are hospitality-related."

Michael Kill, executive director of the Night Time Industries Association, warned that the measures could spark a surge in unregulated events and house parties, which are the real sources of infection attended by frustrated young people who have been denied access to safe and legitimate nighttime hospitality locations & # 39 ;.

Up to 6,000 jobs will be cut at Premier Inn owner Whitbread, who also runs the Beefeater pubs and the Brewers Fayre chains.

The pub chain Wetherspoon also said it wrote to its 1,000 airport employees to warn them that between 400 and 450 jobs are at risk of layoffs.

Officer employees have been instructed to work from home "when possible", although those in "major public services and all professions" where they cannot, such as construction and retail should continue to work

Officer employees have been instructed to work from home "when possible", although those in "major public services and all professions" where they cannot, such as construction and retail should continue to work

TO WORK FROM HOME

Officer employees have been instructed to work from home "when possible", although those in "major public services and all professions" where they cannot, such as construction and retail should continue to work.

Cabinet Minister Michael Gove: "We stress that you should be there when it is safe to work in your workplace, when you are in a Covid-safe workplace, when your job requires it.

"But if you can work from home, you should."

There is also confusion about who decides what is “possible”, which is likely to be a focal point between employers and employees in the future.

The new embassy brings England in line with Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, who have advised all people to work from home wherever possible during the pandemic.

If companies are not Covid Safe, violate mask regulations, or violate the rule of six, they will be fined £ 10,000 or shut down.

If people prevent others from self-isolating – such as bosses threatening redundancy – they can also be fined.

FACE MASKS

Face masks must be worn by indoor and restaurant customers except when they are seated at a table to eat or drink.

Starting tomorrow, covers will also have to be worn in taxis and private rental vehicles, as well as by retail employees at work – although most had already introduced this requirement.

There are fines of £ 200 in England or £ 60 in Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales in statutory locations for those who do not wear face coverings and are not exempt.

The prime minister has also announced tougher enforcement measures, which will face fines or closures for companies for failing to comply with coronavirus rules. This has consequences for pubs trying to serve you at the bar.

Commuters cross London Bridge during the morning rush hour in September

Commuters cross London Bridge during the morning rush hour in September

A man is enjoying a drink at The Kings Ford Pub in Chingford, East London, as the Prime Minister made his announcement in the House of Commons this afternoon

A man is enjoying a drink at The Kings Ford Pub in Chingford, East London, as the Prime Minister made his announcement in the House of Commons this afternoon

Martin Hewitt, chairman of the National Board of Police Chiefs, said: "Individuals, businesses and households are all responsible for keeping the virus suppressed, and the police force will do their part to help the public guide the measures that apply to our security."

& # 39; Our approach of connecting with people and explaining the rules that apply will remain. The vast majority of situations are resolved after these two phases with no further encouragement or enforcement, ”he said.

The police will continue to work with their communities and only impose fines as a last resort.

& # 39; The Chiefs will step up their patrols in risk areas and proactively work with businesses, licensing and local authorities to ensure rules are followed.

"If members of the public are concerned that the law is being violated or they experience unsocial behavior, they can report it to the police, who will consider the most appropriate response and target the most problematic behavior."

SIX RULE AND SELF-ISOLATION

In England, a maximum of six people from multiple households can meet indoors and outdoors – in private houses, pubs, restaurants and parks.

All age groups are included in the number of employees. There are some exceptions – for example, when a single household has more than six residents.

The rule of six has been expanded to include the areas of "leisure", "entertainment", "tourism" and "close contact". The latter includes hairdressers and other beauty treatments.

More details are expected on what this will specifically mean for places like gyms, although today Mr Johnson banned indoor group sports like five-on-five soccer.

That means hairdressers, nail bars, and beauty salons can still work right now, but they need to further reduce the number of people who can serve them at the same time.

Anyone who breaks the UK social gathering rules will be fined £ 200, with the penalty doubling up to £ 3,200 for each subsequent repetition.

Businesses that break the rule of six will be fined £ 10,000 or shut down.

Further guidance on these details is awaited but has yet to be released by the government.

Those with coronavirus symptoms who do not self-isolate will face fines of £ 1,000, rising to £ 10,000 for repeat offenses from September 28th.

SCHOOLS

The schools remain unaffected by the new restrictions. In addition to protecting the economy, one of the main focuses of today's announcements is the government's desire to prioritize keeping schools open.

Mr Johnson said, “I want to stress that this is by no means a return to a full March lockdown. We do not issue general instructions to stay home.

“We will ensure that schools, colleges and universities remain open – because nothing is more important than the education, health and well-being of our young people. We will ensure that companies can stay open in a Covid-compliant manner. & # 39;

WEDDINGS AND REASONS

Starting next Monday, wedding ceremonies and receptions in England must be limited to 15 people – from 30 people.

Funeral homes are exempt from the new restrictions, however, with the maximum number of mourners remaining at 30.

Celebrations this weekend will barely bypass the new restrictions.

Outlining the action in the House of Commons, Mr Johnson said, “Fifth, now is the time to tighten the rule of six.

"I'm afraid that from Monday a maximum of 15 people will be able to attend wedding ceremonies and receptions, although up to now 30 can still attend a funeral."

Starting next Monday, wedding ceremonies and receptions in England must be limited to 15 people - from 30 people. Funeral directors are exempt from the new restrictions, however, with the maximum number of mourners remaining at 30

Starting next Monday, wedding ceremonies and receptions in England must be limited to 15 people – from 30 people. Funeral homes are exempt from the new restrictions, however, with the maximum number of mourners remaining at 30

Current guidelines state that up to 30 participants are allowed in Wales, while in Scotland ceremonies and receptions are limited to 20 and the number depends on the venue in Northern Ireland.

A bride who was due to get married on December 12 after a five-year engagement and originally planned a 100-person wedding in Norfolk said she felt “gutted” after the announcement.

"We then see people online saying that it doesn't matter, it doesn't matter and at least we don't have Covid and then we feel that our feelings are not valid," 40-year-old Laura Brown told the PA news agency .

"It's a day, but it's so much more than a day because of all the emotions that go into it."

In the meantime, the self-employed wedding receptionist Chris Gray from Glasgow described the restrictions on weddings as "nonsensical", for example that couples have to wear blankets during the ceremony.

The 29-year-old added, "This has resulted in so many people having to cancel or rearrange weddings and in the short term it was an absolute hammer blow to cash flow for me."

OTHER PUBLIC SPACES

SPORT FITS

In England a maximum of six people can participate in indoor team sports. However, major sporting events and conferences will not take place from October 1st as planned.

Mr Johnson announced that the planned return of spectators to sports venues in England could be suspended for six months, adding to the prospect of more months of games behind closed doors.

A number of pilots took place with capacity limited to 1,000, and it was hoped that venues could welcome more spectators from early October.

In England, a maximum of six people can participate in indoor team sports. However, major sporting events and conferences will not take place from October 1st as planned

In England, a maximum of six people can participate in indoor team sports. However, major sporting events and conferences will not take place from October 1st as planned

In England a maximum of six people can participate in indoor team sports. However, major sporting events and conferences will not take place from October 1st as planned

In England, a maximum of six people can participate in indoor team sports. However, major sporting events and conferences will not take place from October 1st as planned

However, the Prime Minister put a number of tough new restrictions on England to limit the spread of Covid-19.

"We must acknowledge that the spread of the virus is now affecting our ability to reopen business conferences, exhibitions and major sporting events," he told the House of Commons.

“So we won't be able to do this from October 1st and I recognize the impact on our sports clubs, which are the life and soul of our communities, and … the Chancellor and Secretary of Culture are urgently working on what we do can do now to support them. & # 39;

He said the measures announced Tuesday would stay in place for "maybe six months".

It is a devastating blow to sports organizations, many of which rely heavily on matchday income to survive, and calls have been made by government agencies for the government to provide emergency funding.

The professional sport, including the Premier League and test cricket, has largely been played behind closed doors since returning after the coronavirus shutdown earlier this year.

The Ministry of Digital, Culture, Media and Sport confirmed that all pilot events planned for September have now been canceled. They will now take place without fans.

In a statement this afternoon, the Premier League said fans were "as safe or even safer than any other public activity currently allowed".

"The Premier League takes note of today's government announcement and while the nation's health must remain a priority we are disappointed that the safe return of fans to the Games has been postponed," it said.

& # 39; The Premier League is confident that fans in stadiums will be just as safe or even safer than any other through league-wide guidelines and a code of conduct developed with scientific experts and agreed by the Government's Sports Field Safety Agency currently permitted public activity. This is already evident in other European leagues. & # 39;

How long do the new restrictions apply?

The new restrictions put in place today could last six months – but Mr Johnson has insisted they don't represent a return to the March national lockdown.

He said, “This virus is a fact in our lives for now and I have to tell the House and the country that our fight against it will continue.

"We will not listen to those who say they are ripping the virus apart, nor those who are calling for a permanent lockdown. We are taking decisive and appropriate steps to balance saving human life with protecting jobs and livelihoods. & # 39;

Many families will look forward to Christmas after hearing the new rules – but ministers have insisted they don't want to ruin the holiday season.

The five days of panic that paved the way for Boris Johnson to curfew on pubs

Thursday: The latest official data presented to ministers showed that coronavirus cases were increasing in all age groups, while hospital admissions increased across the board. The numbers are said to have prompted Michael Gove to call for decisive action.

By the end of the day, a "consensus" had reportedly emerged on a plan for a complete shutdown of the hospitality and leisure sectors, with Mr Gove and Health Secretary Matt Hancock being the leading supporters.

Advisors to the Emergency Scientific Advisory Group also backed the plans, arguing that it would not be possible to predict the effects of a less stringent curfew on pubs, bars and restaurants.

Mr Johnson was reportedly initially in favor of a full shutdown.

Friday: The prospect of a complete shutdown terrified ministers and officials from the Treasury and the Ministry of Economy, Energy and Industrial Strategy, who feared the damage such a move would do to the economy.

Chancellor Rishi Sunak is said to have asked the Prime Minister and the couple to meet on Friday afternoon. Mr Sunak has set out his fears personally and Mr Johnson appears to have agreed with the Chancellor’s message and asked officials to consider other options.

Saturdays and Sundays: Mr Johnson held further discussions with senior ministers, as well as Chief Scientific Adviser Sir Patrick Vallance and Chief Medical Officer Professor Chris Whitty, as the Prime Minister tried to find an agreed path forward. Mr Johnson eventually decided to implement a curfew rather than a full shutdown as the "hawks" in the cabinet seemed to be winning the battle with the "pigeons".

Monday: The Prime Minister's latest lockdown plans were formally adopted by senior ministers ahead of an official announcement today.

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