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Black Lives Matter protesters wave placards outside Tottenham Police Station


Crowds came to a London police station to support rapper Wretch 32 – whose father was verbally abused by the police – and to protest against "police racism, police violence and police impunity".

The crowd gathered peacefully in the scorching temperature to hear speeches and demonstrate outside Tottenham Police Station.

Activists spoke to crowds near signs reading "Police Dismissed, Invest in Our Lives" and "1,750 deaths in police custody or after contact with police in England and Wales since 1990".

Musician Wretch 32, real name Jermaine Scott, posted a video on Twitter of his father Millard Scott, 62, who fell down after being tasering by officials in north London in April.

Wretch 32 was seen in the crowd on Saturday as protesters spoke of their own treatment by police.

He told the crowd, “I'm sad that we have to stand here today. I have the feeling that we as a community, as a people, are over-police and under-protected.

“We don't feel protected. My father didn't feel protected. The police are supposed to protect and serve. What exactly did they serve with that taser when they got into the house? & # 39;

Crowds came to a London police station to support the rapper Wretch 32 (picture) – whose father was verbally abused by the police – and to protest against "police racism, police violence and impunity by the police".

Wretch 32 (left) was seen next to his father Millard Scott, 62, on Saturday as protesters spoke of their own treatment by the police

Wretch 32 (left) was seen next to his father Millard Scott, 62, on Saturday as protesters spoke of their own treatment by the police

He said people "did not trust the system" and it was a battle with the police that the community had faced since childhood.

Then he put an arm around his father and said, “My father is here today. In my eyes he is lucky enough to be alive. & # 39;

The crowd urged officials to stop so-called over-policing of the black communities along with the use of excessive force, tasers, stop-and-search and the disproportionate use of handcuffs during the arrest.

A list was pinned to a barrier in front of the police station with the names – both black and white – of people who died after contact with the police from the 1980s.

Crowds came to a London police station nine years after Mark Duggan's death to protest "police racism, police violence and impunity"

Crowds came to a London police station nine years after Mark Duggan's death to protest "police racism, police violence and impunity"

Wretch 32, real name Jermaine Scott, posted a video on Twitter of his father Millard Scott, 62, (pictured together today) falling down the stairs after being verbally abused by officials in north London in April

Wretch 32, real name Jermaine Scott, posted a video on Twitter of his father Millard Scott, 62, (pictured together today) falling down the stairs after being verbally abused by officials in north London in April

The crowd (some attendees pictured) urged officials to stop so-called over-policing of the black communities, along with the excessive use of force, tasers, stop-and-search and the disproportionate use of handcuffs during the arrest

The crowd (some attendees pictured) urged officials to stop so-called over-policing of the black communities, along with the excessive use of force, tasers, stop-and-search and the disproportionate use of handcuffs during the arrest

Crowds came to Tottenham Police Station for a demonstration in north London today

Crowds came to Tottenham Police Station for a demonstration in north London today

Banners called for "justice" for Cynthia Jarrett, Joy Gardner, Mark Duggan, Smiley Culture, Roger Sylvester, Ian Tomlinson and Jean Charles de Menezes.

The protest came nine years after 29-year-old Duggan was shot dead in Tottenham after armed officials intercepted a minicab he was traveling in based on news that he was carrying a gun.

A pistol was later found about seven meters from the minicab.

The August 2011 gunfight of Mr Duggan by an officer known only as the V53 sparked riot for almost a week in London, Birmingham, Bristol, Manchester and other English cities.

Messages reading "The Met Police Have To Stop And Stop" and "Fire The Police, Invest In Our Lives" read on a door of the police station today.

Mark Duggan, 29, (pictured) was shot dead in Tottenham after armed officers intercepted a minicab he was traveling in on the basis of news that he was carrying a gun

Mark Duggan, 29, (pictured) was shot dead in Tottenham after armed officers intercepted a minicab he was traveling in on the basis of news that he was carrying a gun

Mina Agyepong, 42, told the crowd that her 12-year-old son Kai "is traumatized and angry" after armed police raided her home in north London late that night in July to arrest him.

He had played with a toy gun. A passer-by had aroused the suspicion that he had seen a black man holding a gun on the sofa.

She said, “I am now concerned about what his relationship with the police will be – this feeling of suspicion. Stop criminalizing our children. & # 39;

The riots in Tottenham began in 1985 when Broadwater Farm woman Jarrett died of heart failure after four police officers broke into her home during a robbery on October 5.

Her son fought back tears as he told the crowd, “I get emotional when I think of my mother because I love her.

“We all have to stick together and march on. We must keep protesting because this is for all of our children and for our future. You can tear your family down from top to bottom. & # 39;

Winston Silcott was one of the three Tottenham Three, alongside Engin Raghip and Mark Braithwaite, convicted of the 1987 rioting of PC Keith Blakelock.

Her convictions were overturned by the Appeals Court in 1991 after questions were asked about the way police interviews were conducted.

Mr. Silcott helped with the demonstration on Saturday.

According to Scotland Yard, officers went to the address of the father of Wretch 32 in Tottenham on April 21 as part of an operation to combat drug supplies related to serious violence in Haringey.

The police guard, the Independent Office for Police Conduct (IOPC), has announced not to investigate the incident and the matter should be dealt with within the Met Police.

Winston Silcott (pictured) was one of the Tottenham Three, along with Engin Raghip and Mark Braithwaite, convicted of the 1987 riots for the murder of PC Keith Blakelock

Winston Silcott (pictured) was one of the Tottenham Three, along with Engin Raghip and Mark Braithwaite, convicted of the 1987 riots for the murder of PC Keith Blakelock

Protesters gathered outside Tottenham Police Station today to oppose

Protesters gathered outside Tottenham Police Station today to protest “police racism, police violence and police impunity”.

A protester held a sign that read "No justice, no peace, defuse the police".

A protester held a sign that read "No justice, no peace, defuse the police".

Activists spoke to crowds while standing in front of signs reading "The police are disappointing, investing in our lives" and "1,750 deaths in police custody or after contact with the police in England and Wales since 1990".

Activists spoke to crowds while standing in front of signs reading "The police are disappointing, investing in our lives" and "1,750 deaths in police custody or after contact with the police in England and Wales since 1990".

Tottenham Rights, The Monitoring Group, Black Lives Matter UK and Stopwatch also jointly organized the demonstration (participant pictured), and all participants were urged to adhere to social distancing rules

Tottenham Rights, The Monitoring Group, Black Lives Matter UK and Stopwatch also jointly organized the demonstration (participant pictured), and all participants were urged to adhere to social distancing rules

An activist spoke to crowds outside Tottenham Police Station. Signs were stuck to a door

An activist spoke to crowds outside Tottenham Police Station. Signs were stuck to a door

A woman wears a mask with her fist, a symbol of the Black Lives Matter movement

A woman wears a mask with her fist, a symbol of the Black Lives Matter movement

Deputy Police Commissioner Sir Stephen House told a Police and Crime Committee of the London Assembly in July that the IOPC had decided "this matter should be returned to you, the City Police, for a fair and fair deal".

City police at the time had reviewed the incident and said they had found no wrongdoing, but the IOPC called the matter for its own assessment.

Police said no further action will be taken as there is no public complaint and no evidence of wrongdoing.

Should a public complaint be filed or information about violations provided, the matter would be referred to the IOPC again.

Treena Fleming, the North Area Command Unit's Metropolitan Police commander, said, “I can understand why any use of taser can look alarming, and why it looked alarming in this instance.

"We never underestimate the impact such an incident can have on a family and the entire community."

She said the officers are "highly skilled at grabbing, explaining and resolving situations, using only force when absolutely necessary".

Temi Mwale – the director of the London-based 4Front project – wrote on Instagram ahead of today's event: “It's been nine years since the Metropolitan Police killed Mark Duggan in Tottenham and sparked riots across the country.

Police continue to injure, brutalize and kill black people with impunity. On the 9th anniversary of the uprising, we will demand justice.

“We empower young blacks, who are hardest hit by police violence, to fight for their rights and hear their voices. No justice. No peace. & # 39;

The group supports people with experiences of violence and the criminal justice system and empowers them to “fight for justice, peace and freedom”.

Tottenham Rights, The Monitoring Group, Black Lives Matter UK and Stopwatch also jointly organized the demonstration and all participants were urged to adhere to the social distancing rules.

A protester holds a sign that reads “Black Lives Matter. The British police also murdered at today's demonstration

A protester holds a sign that reads “Black Lives Matter. The British police also murdered at today's demonstration

A woman stands in Tottenham next to a painted sign that reads “No Justice, No Peace” and “Black Lives Matter”

A woman stands in Tottenham next to a painted sign that reads “No Justice, No Peace” and “Black Lives Matter”

Protesters take part in a protest against Black Lives Matter outside the Tottenham Police Station

Protesters take part in a protest against Black Lives Matter outside the Tottenham Police Station

A flag soaked in fake blood was hoisted. It read: “Britain is not innocent. Our blood your hands & # 39;

A flag soaked in fake blood was hoisted. It read: “Britain is not innocent. Our blood your hands & # 39;

Signs were posted at the entrance to Tottenham Police Station as protesters spoke to the crowd today

Signs were posted at the entrance to Tottenham Police Station as protesters spoke to the crowd today

Temi Mwale - the director of the London-based 4Front project - shared a poster (pictured) and wrote on Instagram: "It's been nine years since Tottenham City Police killed Mark Duggan and sparked riots across the country."

Temi Mwale – the director of the London-based 4Front project – shared a poster (pictured) and wrote on Instagram: "It's been nine years since Tottenham City Police killed Mark Duggan and sparked riots across the country."

The protests this weekend were in stark contrast to the protesters who took to the streets in paramilitary clothing last Saturday to take part in a march through London on African Emancipation Day.

The event was classified as "divisive" by Nigel Farage.

Hundreds of demonstrators halted Brixton as they marched through London.

Farage said: & # 39; Terrifying scenes in Brixton today. A paramilitary force is marching on the streets.

"The BLM movement wanted this from the start and it will split our society like never before."

A group of protesters in black military uniforms marches in close formation through the streets of London. They are led by men who give orders like "Atten hut!" and & # 39; Right Face! & # 39; and look like a well-trained group of soldiers on parade

The protests this weekend follow the march of the African Emancipation Day last Saturday through London (picture)

Family Forever members resembled the revolutionary Black Panther activists of the 1960s in America

Family Forever members resembled the revolutionary Black Panther activists of the 1960s in America

A promotional video by the group (pictured on the march) said they were "united in the fight against racism, inequality and injustice".

A promotional video by the group (pictured on the march) said they were "united in the fight against racism, inequality and injustice".

The Greens' co-chair, Jonathan Bartley, responded to Mr. Farage's intervention.

He tweeted: "You're just trying to create a split. But these people in Brixton know today that love and justice will overcome the fear and hate you sell. Hope is what people need right now and they show the way there. & # 39;

City police said three people were arrested during the demonstration last weekend.

The new face of racial hatred: As they marched through London they claimed to be fighting bigotry – but as this exposé by GUY ADAMS reveals, its leader wallows in anti-Semitic abuse … with terrifying echoes of 1930s fascism

By Guy Adams for the Daily Mail

A group of protesters in black military uniforms marches in close formation through the streets of London.

They are led by men who give orders like "Atten hut!" and & # 39; Right Face! & # 39; and look like a well-trained group of soldiers on parade.

Some have dark berets, gloves, and knee-high leather boots. Some wear walkie talkies. At least one is wearing an IRA-style balaclava.

In a way, the scene seems to repeat the 1930s, when Oswald Mosley's "Blackshirts" brought their ugly fascism to the working-class neighborhoods of our capital. But that was Brixton last Saturday.

A group of protesters in black military uniforms marches in close formation through the streets of London. They are led by men who give orders like "Atten hut!" and & # 39; Right Face! & # 39; and look like a well-trained group of soldiers on parade

A group of protesters in black military uniforms marches in close formation through the streets of London. They are led by men who give orders like "Atten hut!" and & # 39; Right Face! & # 39; and look like a well-trained group of soldiers on parade

The occasion was a march for African Emancipation Day, held each year on the first day of August, both to mark the anniversary of the entry into force of the law on the abolition of slavery in 1834 and to promote Britain to pay reparations for its role in the transatlantic Slave trade.

The protesters in their stab vests and paramilitary suits belonged to a strange new organization called the Forever Family Force.

It was founded last month to track what has been described on its social media as the "fight against racism, inequality and injustice". It appears to have been conceived as a kind of British version of the Black Panthers, the radical protest group on the far left that wore robes similar to those used to fight police brutality in America in the 1960s.

In keeping with this tradition, Forever Family has already sparked controversy.

To critics, the group appears to be importing a flammable brand of American identity politics, oxygenated by the Black Lives Matter movement, encouraging people of color to believe that society is so intrinsically racist that their only hope is in it exists to grow an organized resistance against the ruling class.

Among those who see them as divisive and intimidating is Nigel Farage, who shared pictures of last Saturday's protest on Twitter and said, “Terrifying scenes in Brixton today. A paramilitary force is marching on the streets. This is what the BLM movement wanted from the start and it will divide our society like never before. & # 39;

For their part, supporters point out that the Brixton event was largely peaceful, with only three arrests, arguing that Forever Family is a harmless, if somewhat eccentric, group of well-meaning activists who love to dress up.

In a way, the scene seems to repeat the 1930s, when Oswald Mosley's "Blackshirts" brought their ugly fascism to the working-class neighborhoods of our capital. But that was Brixton last Saturday

In a way, the scene seems to repeat the 1930s, when Oswald Mosley's "Blackshirts" brought their ugly fascism to the working-class neighborhoods of our capital. But that was Brixton last Saturday

One of those camps is Jonathan Bartley, co-chair of the Greens, who responded to Farage by saying, “You are just trying to create a split. But these people of Brixton know today that love and justice will overcome fear and hate you if you peddle. Hope is what people need right now and they show the way there. & # 39;

So what's the truth? Well, this is where it starts to get interesting.

Despite Mr. Bartley's comment on "love and justice," I can show that Forever Family is run by a highly controversial musician who recently used social media to offer hideous insults against other minority groups.

Among other things, he has shared profound anti-transgender memes, spread bizarre anti-vaccination conspiracy theories, and suggested that Bill Gates killed tens of thousands of children in third world countries and is somehow responsible for the coronavirus pandemic.

The leader of the Forever Family has also made a number of anti-Semitic statements that hold Jews responsible for slavery.

In a series of Instagram posts earlier this month, he described the alleged role of the Jewish community in the slave trade as "the original Holocaust," criticized "devils" fighting left anti-Semitism on social media, and put forward another selection Conspiracy theories that claim that Jews "own" the banking system through what is known as the Rothschild bloodline.

It's an utterly repugnant worldview that anyone can take, especially the leader of a group that pretends to fight against racism.

Indeed, some might argue that the real agenda of this militarist protest group is not that far removed from that of the Black Panthers, whose leaders have unofficial successors denied the Holocaust and labeled Jews as "hook-nosed" scammers and "bloodsuckers" by the poor benefit black community.

Perhaps this explains why the founder of Forever Family appears to have taken extensive steps to keep his identity a secret, despite the high profile protests.

The organization is opaque on paper. The website consists of a picture of a clenched fist and links to Twitter and Instagram accounts that have been set to "private" so that only approved users can read them.

On a Facebook page, also accessible through the website, viewers can watch two short videos claiming the organization exists to mobilize, organize and centralize community initiatives to organizations with similar ones To strengthen and support goals and to say that they agree to build a self-sufficient and stable community ”.

What these vague guiding principles mean and how the group proposes to actually achieve their goals is unclear.

Neither his social media accounts nor his website contain any information about who is behind it.

The only backer who has made his identity public is a musician named Mega – not the leader of the aforementioned group – who performs with hip-hop collective So Solid Crew. He used Twitter to explain that he had attended last Saturday's protest and boasted, "We banned Brixton today."

Ironically, given this clandestine practice, the films distributed by Forever Family also claim that their values ​​are "integrity, transparency and accountability".

One thing that Forever Family is dying to get their hands on is money. And that's exactly what enables us to track down its founder: some of its social media pages contain links to a PayPal site where backers can donate to the cause.

The posts will then be forwarded to a company called Forever Family Limited, which was founded on June 20 and operates from a service address in Hoxton, East London, according to PayPal.

Companies House records show that the company's secretary is a 27-year-old woman from Wandsworth, south London named Rachelle Emanuel. The sole director – and the leader and founder of the group – is a 28-year-old resident of Ilford, east London named Khari McKenzie.

No one responded to a request for comment.

Little is known about Ms. Emanuel. McKenzie, listed as "significant control" of Forever Family, is a rap artist who goes by the stage name Raspect.

He appears to have become politically active in 2011 after police shot and killed Mark Duggan, a 29-year-old gang member whose death that year sparked riots in London and elsewhere.

In the past few years, McKenzie has been active in a community group called "GANG", whose supporters wear stab vests to gang violence incidents and use loudspeakers to encourage locals to take to the streets to "reclaim the space."

In early 2018, McKenzie made a series of appearances on the Victoria Derbyshire BBC chat show to talk about racial relations following the death of Edson Da Costa, a 25-year-old from East London who died after using plastic bags Heroin had been swallowed and cocaine had cracked. Car was stopped by police.

In a bizarre interview with Derbyshire earlier this year, he urged viewers not to call the police about criminal incidents, saying, "Don't call 999, call the G-Line," an obvious reference to GANG's contact number . Around the same time, he was photographed shaking hands with London Mayor Sadiq Khan in City Hall.

The group's sole director and leader and founder is a 28 year old resident of Ilford, East London named Khari McKenzie

The sole director – and the leader and founder of the group – is a 28-year-old resident of Ilford, east London named Khari McKenzie

More recently, McKenzie has been filming, as he put it, "rudely interrupted, harassed and threatened" by police officers who asked why he was apparently breaking the lockdown rules to catch up with a group of acquaintances in a park of the Covid epidemic.

And in early June, shortly after the assassination of George Floyd in the United States, he began to photograph himself in military clothing during protests against Black Lives Matter in London.

More recently, McKenzie's public statements – especially since the Forever Family was founded – have become more volatile, not to mention the offensive.

For example, last year he used Instagram to share a transphobic joke suggesting that people who identify as female but are born male are likely to be sex offenders.

"A man followed a young girl into the Asda toilets in London and said he identified himself as a woman," it said. "The man's teeth were knocked out by the girl's father, who said he identified himself as a tooth fairy."

In the spring of this year, he uploaded several posts to Instagram making various claims about Bill Gates, suggesting that the Microsoft founder is somehow exploiting the Covid crisis to try to force mandatory vaccinations on the world.

This strange conspiracy theory, which is making the rounds of the corners of the internet popular with the anti-vaccination movement, reflects the pointless belief that Mr Gates found that vaccines will kill people who take them, and so advocates it as part of it a conspiracy to reduce the world's population.

"The same guy who says we have to suddenly depopulate wants to save everyone with his vaccines," read one such post from McKenzie.

Another wrongly claimed that 48,000 children in India were "paralyzed by Bill Gates' polio vaccine." A third post named him a "documented thief" who "owns vaccine businesses" and "visited (Jeffrey) Epstein's pedo (sic) island countless times".

In fact, there is no evidence that Mr Gates is a criminal or that he has ever visited Mr Epstein's private island (despite meeting him and once traveling on his private jet).

McKenzie doesn't just post paranoid content on Instagram, though. He also uploads apparently anti-Semitic content.

In June, he began using the network to attack the Jewish community, sharing a false conspiracy theory that the kneeling restraint technique used by the policeman who killed George Floyd in Minneapolis in May was learned in secret seminars had been with Israeli security forces.

"Research that funded the greatest holocaust and crimes against humanity in the transatlantic slave trade without making amends," he said in an Instagram post that was illustrated with images of the Israeli armed forces. "Look who is behind police training in the US and UK to put our feet on our necks."

Corbynite actress Maxine Peake expressed similar feelings around the same time, leading to the dismissal of Shadow Cabinet Secretary Rebecca Long-Bailey, whom she referred to as the "diamond". Peake later apologized.

Last week, McKenzie continued on that questionable vibe by using Instagram to share a video of himself giving a lengthy speech on Zionism.

"Every Zionist is an Islamophobe," he said. “It doesn't make me anti-Semitic if I don't consent to the oppression in Palestine. This is stupidity, yes.

So if we talk about Zionists, and even if I disagree with the people who run the banks, yes, and if they run the banks the rich get richer and the poor get poorer, if I don't agree with that to, that doesn't turn me against anyone. I'm only against oppression.

"When I look in my history book and see that there were people with Zionist blood who were heavily involved in the transatlantic slave trade, the reference to it does not make me anti-Semitic …"

The next day, McKenzie attacked the "devils" who had successfully persuaded Instagram, YouTube and Twitter to close the accounts of a rap artist named Wiley who had carried out a series of highly anti-Semitic attacks on the Jewish community.

In addition to circulating a petition calling for Wiley's reinstatement, his posts attacking the move included a number of anti-Semitic hashtags, including #Rothschildbloodline and #whoownsthebanks, which advanced the arc of the Nazi era for Jews to be in control of all international ones Have finances.

In response to these posts, a spokesperson for the Anti-Semitism Campaign told me: “There is no justification for using anti-Semitic tropes to commemorate the horrors of slavery or to protest the ongoing racism in society today.

"Forever Family should appreciate that it is frightening for ordinary decent people, and the Jewish community in particular, to see a paramilitary (group) in black shirts marching the streets of London, led by a man who is against "Zionist bloodlines" scolds the darkest hour of mankind and does nothing to advance the noble cause of the fight against racism. Prejudice cannot be defeated by more prejudice. & # 39;

To put it more clearly, the group that dressed in uniform a week ago to retake the streets of Brixton – and so publicly endorsed by the Green co-leader – has too much in common with these fascist black shirts that the one before more when 80 years marched through London in similar clothes.

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