ENTERTAINMENT

Black and white images from the civil rights movement of 1963 were shown in color for the first time


A collection of some of the most significant moments and figures of the civil rights movement has been brought to life in recolored images.

British author and visual historian Jordan J. Lloyd has given color to more than a dozen black and white images depicting pivotal moments in the pivotal movement.

The powerful images show the struggle of blacks during segregation and the many attempts they had to make to achieve equal rights for things like pay, work and housing.

Some examples in the online gallery are the March on Washington for Work and Freedom on August 28, 1963, a boy drinking from a separate water fountain, and a black man having to use a different entrance to the whites in a movie theater.

The collection also includes headshots of some of the movement's most influential figures, including Malcolm X Angela Davis and Martin Luther King Jr., who delivered his iconic and powerful “I Have a Dream” speech at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington in March.

Jordan published the high-resolution color in full color for free to the public on the Unsplash picture page and was shared on BoredPanda.

Men and women of all generations took to the streets of Washington DC holding posters demanding equality – including integrated schools and decent housing

A snapshot of the Seattle Police Department shows a Racial Equality-sponsored demonstration outside a brokerage office on May 4, 1964. Protesters called for an end to racial discrimination and the need for open housing

A snapshot of the Seattle Police Department shows a Racial Equality-sponsored demonstration outside a brokerage office on May 4, 1964. Protesters called for an end to racial discrimination and the need for open housing

On a Saturday afternoon in Belzoni, Mississippi Delta, a black man enters the separate entrance to the cinema. Photo taken in October 1939

On a Saturday afternoon in Belzoni, Mississippi Delta, a black man enters the separate entrance to the cinema. Photo taken in October 1939

A young boy drinks from a fountain designed for "colored people" on the lawn of the Halifax, North Carolina District Court in 1938

A young boy drinks from a fountain designed for "colored people" on the lawn of the Halifax, North Carolina District Court in 1938

Martin Luther King, one of the greatest figureheads of the civil rights movement, pictured himself speaking at a press conference on August 26, 1963, two days before thousands of demonstrators came to Washington DC for the March on Washington

Nation of Islam spokesman Malcolm X, a human rights activist, waited at Martin Luther King's press conference on March 26, 1964 before the two met for the first and only time on Capitol Hill

Martin Luther King, one of the greatest figureheads of the civil rights movement, pictured himself speaking at a press conference on August 26, 1963, two days before thousands of demonstrators came to Washington DC for the March on Washington (left). Right, Nation of Islam spokesman Malcolm X, a human rights activist, who waited at the Martin Luther King press conference on March 26, 1964 before the two met for the first and only time on Capitol Hill

The leaders of the March 28, 1963 in Washington smiled, waved and cheered as the enormous crowd took to the streets demanding equal rights for everyone

The leaders of the March 28, 1963 in Washington smiled, waved and cheered as the enormous crowd took to the streets demanding equal rights for everyone

Political activist Angela Davis was pictured in 1974. Davis was a longtime member of the United States Communist Party. During her studies in Frankfurt, the US-bored activist returned to her home country and got involved in numerous causes, including the feminist movement of the second wave and the Black Panther party

A woman gives speeches at the March of the Poor at the Washington Monument and Lincoln Memorial on June 19, 1968. The year-long campaign organized by Martin Luther King Jr. and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference calls for an end to economic injustice

Political activist Angela Davis was pictured in 1974 (left). Davis was a longtime member of the United States Communist Party. During her studies in Frankfurt, the US-bored activist returned to her home country and got involved in numerous causes, including the feminist movement of the second wave and the Black Panther party. That's right, a woman gives speeches on June 19, 1968 at the March of the Poor at the Washington Monument and the Lincoln Memorial. The year-long campaign organized by Martin Luther King Jr. and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference calls for an end to economic injustice

Protesters of all races and ages who participated in the Washington March for Work and Freedom held thousands of signs demanding equal voting rights and jobs for all with fair pay

Protesters of all races and ages who participated in the Washington March for Work and Freedom held thousands of signs demanding equal voting rights and jobs for all with fair pay

During the protests, hundreds of protesters gathered around the reflective pool and dipped their feet in the water in front of the Lincoln Memorial, where Martin Luther King Jr. made his iconic speech

During the protests, hundreds of protesters gathered around the reflective pool and dipped their feet in the water in front of the Lincoln Memorial, where Martin Luther King Jr. made his iconic speech

Civil rights activist John Lewis, who served in the United States House of Representatives until his death in July of this year, spoke on April 16, 1964 at a meeting of the editors of the American Society of Newspaper at the Statler Hilton Hotel in Washington, DC

Civil rights activist John Lewis, who served in the United States House of Representatives until his death in July of this year, spoke on April 16, 1964 at a meeting of the editors of the American Society of Newspaper at the Statler Hilton Hotel in Washington, DC

Thousands of protesters, including priests and people of different backgrounds and ages, lined the streets calling on the government to "end prejudice now".

Thousands of protesters, including priests and people of different backgrounds and ages, lined the streets calling on the government to "end prejudice now".

American attorney and civil rights activist Thurgood Marshall, who became the first African American to serve as the United States Attorney General, was pictured on September 17, 1957. The attorney founded the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund

American attorney and civil rights activist Thurgood Marshall, who became the first African American to serve as the United States Attorney General, was pictured on September 17, 1957. The attorney founded the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund

African American protesters gather outside the White House in Washington DC with signs reading "We Demand Suffrage Everywhere" and "Stop the Brutality in Alabama" in response to police brutality against activists in Selma on March 12, 1965

African American protesters gather outside the White House in Washington DC with signs reading "We Demand Suffrage Everywhere" and "Stop the Brutality in Alabama" in response to police brutality against activists in Selma on March 12, 1965

Even young women took part in the protests, carrying signs with thousands of people in the crowd as they marched on Washington

Even young women took part in the protests, carrying signs with thousands of people in the crowd as they marched in Washington

A special bus service that took protesters to the capital for a day of campaign and protest for March on Washington, August 28, 1963

A special bus service that took protesters to the capital for a day of campaign and protest for March on Washington, August 28, 1963

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