ENTERTAINMENT

BBC under fire from all sides for gagging Britannia


The BBC came under fire from across the political spectrum today when it decided to drop the vocals of Rule Britannia and Land of Hope and Glory on the last night of the Proms after critics claimed the patriotic anthems were "racist".

Tory MPs accused the company of "erasing history" and "waking idiots" while the Labor Party criticized the censorship of patriotic songs.

Others mocked the company for suggesting that singing the songs was too risky due to the Covid pandemic, noting that the national anthem is still sung by a lonely voice on the evening of September 12.

The national broadcaster initially considered dropping the patriotic songs after criticizing their alleged links to slavery and colonialism, but after a large number of bosses backed out and announced that they would be played but not sung instead.

Boris Johnson said today, "I wanted to tweet about it but I just want to say … if it's right, which I can't believe it really is, but if it's right the BBC says they will Do not sing the words of the Land of Hope and Glory or the Rule of Britannia! as they traditionally do at the end of the last night of the Proms.

“I think it is time we stopped being ashamed of our history, our traditions and our culture, and that we stopped this general struggle of self-blame and wetness. I wanted to get this off my chest. & # 39;

Economic Secretary Alok Sharma told Times Radio, “I think last night of the Proms was a great joy for millions of people. Personally, I think it's a very joyful opportunity, I think it's going to be pretty weird if there isn't a live audience there. We heard the position of the BBC that they will keep the traditions.

"Personally, I would love to see the lyrics sung and of course it's always possible to have lyrics displayed as subtitles on the screen so people at home can join in if they want."

In the meantime, Labor leader Sir Keir Starmer also weighed in line. A Labor spokesman said the proms are a staple of the UK summer and enjoying patriotic songs is no barrier to examining and learning about our past.

Nigel Farage and ex-Labor MP Kate Hoey and ex-MEP Richard Tice backed calls to disappoint the BBC on the series, while Tories beat the BBC for despising British patriotism. Actor Laurence Fox also added his voice to phone calls to disappoint the company he called "navel gazing and vigil".

Scroll down for video.

The BBC sparked a new dispute today after announcing that traditional favorites like Land Of Hope And Glory will be listed without text at the Proms (pictured 2012).

Lord Digby Jones criticized the BBC today,

BBC TV presenter Simon McCoy also appeared to mock the decision, writing, "There are no words."

Lord Digby Jones criticized the BBC today, while BBC TV presenter Simon McCoy also appeared to mock the decision, writing, "There are no words."

Nigel Farage suggested that the BBC "must be canceled" when responding to the ongoing series "Last Night of the Proms" this morning

Nigel Farage suggested that the BBC "must be canceled" when responding to the ongoing series "Last Night of the Proms" this morning

Kate Hoey, former Vauxhall MP, said the Proms were "not worth seeing" without the lyrics to the anthems

Kate Hoey, former Vauxhall MP, said the Proms were "not worth seeing" without the lyrics to the anthems

Actor Laurence Fox today urged people to cancel their royalties

He called on Boris Johnson today to act

Actor Laurence Fox urged people to cancel their royalties (left) and urged Boris Johnson to act. The Prime Minister has weighed himself in line and opposed the previous decision by the BBC not to play the anthems at all

The BBC stood by their decision this morning, suggesting that it came from the company and not from others involved in the event, like conductor Dalia Stasevska. A spokesman said: "Decisions about the Proms are made by the BBC."

Lord Adonis said it was "ridiculous" for the BBC to censor the songs, adding, "I have no idea what they owned to believe there was a problem with them."

James Max, a trustee of the Royal Albert Hall, accused the BBC of being afraid of anti-British zealots, adding, "I don't want a bright agenda imposed on the nation."

The decision was apparently also mocked by BBC presenter Simon McCoy, who tweeted, "There are no words."

Meanwhile, Lawrence Fox told Talk Radio, “The BBC is run by the activists. It is a naval-looking, British-hating institution that needs to be massively defused and have full root and branch reform because it is not representative of the country and is extremely patronizing. & # 39;

“The BBC is run by the activists we watch all the time. It is a naval-looking, British-hating institution that needs to be massively defused and have full root and branch reform because it is not representative of the country and is extremely patronizing. & # 39;

Fox also urged the British to put Vera Lynn's version of Land and Hope and Glory at number one, saying, "Wouldn't it be great?"

What is the story of Rule, Britannia, and Land of Hope and Glory?

Britannia comes from the poem of the same name by the Scottish poet and playwright James Thomson and was set to music by the English composer Thomas Arne in 1740.

It gained popularity in the UK after it was first played in London in 1745 and became the symbol of the British Empire, most closely linked to the British Navy.

The song was used as part of a number of compositions including Wagner's 1837 Concerto Overture in D major and Beethoven's orchestral work Wellington & # 39; s Victory.

The song has been an integral part of the annual Remembrance Day celebration since 1930 when it was the first song played on The Traditional Music program.

It became popular again at the end of World War II in 1945 after it was played at the ceremonial surrender of the Japanese Imperial Army in Singapore.

As a rule, Britannia is usually played annually during the BBC's Last Night of the Proms.

Left-wing critics claimed their inclusion had sparked controversy in recent years as it was deemed too patriotic.

The song & # 39; Land of Hope and Glory & # 39; based on the trio theme from Elgar's Pomp And Circumstance March No. 1, which originally premiered in 1901.

It caught the attention of King Edward VII after being the only piece in the history of the Proms to receive a double encore.

King Edward suggested that this trio make a good song, so Elgar worked it into the final section of his Coronation Ode to be performed at King Edward's Coronation.

Claiming the BBC was a victim of a "woke-ist takeover", the actor added, "It doesn't matter what color, creed or religion you are, you can get behind a great song." The melody is fabulous, I think the words are pretty mundane themselves, but as you say it's a highlight and stop erasing our story.

"I sincerely hope so, I think the BBC is right now – with notable exceptions – in a disastrous London bubble of ridicule. That is absolutely divisive.

“It's a wonderful thing to be British, whether you're black, white or Asian. So if you don't like being British, don't be British. The BBC hates the nation and they hate everything about it and that's why I feel like I hate them because I'm so proud of this country. & # 39;

Previously, he tweeted, “Defeat this shameful organization that Britain hates and start over. The madmen are responsible for the asylum. #DefundTheBBC. & # 39;

Hundreds of other Twitter users also joined the line today, urging royalty payers to cancel their payments until the BBC gave in and the lyrics could be sung.

Lord Digby Jones said: “So the BBC is considering removing Rule Britannia & Land of Hope & Glory from the last night of the Proms. Is there no end to their vigilance? How about the pleasure of the millions of Britons paying the license fee? You cannot choose the history on your terms. It's not yours & # 39;

Nigel Farage and former Vauxhall MP Kate Hoey also supported the defunding calls.

Meanwhile, Rother Valley MP Alexander Stafford wrote: “Very disappointed that the BBC is not using the words on some of our best British songs. Are you ashamed to be British? I am sure not. Anyone who feels like singing a song instead to show that "Brits will never, ever be slaves".

Andrew Griffith, MP for Arundel and South Downs, added, “Interesting to see the BBC – led by the Baron Hall of Birkenhead (Commander of the British Empire!) And funded by a mandatory tithe under a Royal Charter – are taking a stand against Anachronisms. & # 39;

Former MEP Richard Tice said: “If the BBC wants to break our patriotism and history by not singing Rule Britannia & Land of Hope & Glory, I want to cancel my royalty. They are breaking their contract with the British people #DefundTheBBC. & # 39;

Sir Keir Starmer also backed the anthems defenders, with a Labor spokesman saying: "The pomp and splendor of last night's Proms are a staple of the British summer.

"The running order is up to the organizers and the BBC, but enjoying patriotic songs is no barrier to examining our past and learning from it."

It came when a BBC insider told The Times that the BBC handling the program sometimes felt like "white men in a panic" trying to appease the Black Lives Matter movement because the songs were obviously along with it Colonialism and slavery were linked.

A BBC spokesman said last night that "new orchestral versions" of the hugely popular hymns would appear in the rousing finale of his concert next month.

The lyrics to Rule Britannia

Rule, Britannia! Britannia, rule the waves!

British will never, never, never be slaves.

As Britain first on the orders of Heaven

Arose from the azure main line,

This was the charter of the land

And guardian angels sang this sort:

The nations are not as blessed as you are

Tyrants must fall again

While you are to flourish big and free:

The fear and envy of everyone.

You should rise even more majestically,

More terrible of every stranger's stroke,

Like the loud explosion that tears the sky apart

Only serves to root your native oak.

You haughty tyrants will never tame;

All of their attempts to bend you down

Just wanna awaken your generous flame

But work their suffering and your reputation.

You own the country rulership;

Your cities will shine with commerce;

All yours should be the main theme

And each bank circles it, yours.

The muses, still found with freedom,

Shall mend to your happy shores.

Blest island! crowned with incomparable beauty,

And male hearts to watch over the mass.

Rule, Britannia! Britannia, rule the waves!

British will never, never, never be slaves

Neither is sung, although a soprano will perform the national anthem Jerusalem and you will never go alone. There will be no live audience due to coronavirus restrictions.

A company source claimed Land of Hope and Glory and Rule Britannia were not sung because "we can't do it justice without a full choir and audience to sing along to."

The insider insisted that the singing would return next year. But the BBC's move was condemned as an "outright excuse".

"There is no reason why no one should sing," said art commentator Norman Lebrecht. & # 39; None of the government policies prohibit it.

& # 39; The BBC has shown no ingenuity or imagination. There's no reason the Albert Hall should be empty – 500 meters down the street, Cadogan Hall plays concerts with the audience. It was really a time of the BBC's decline, a failure of the imagination.

& # 39; It's a complete excuse. I'm afraid it's another of those really weak BBC moments, and for the Proms, it's an act of self-harm. & # 39;

Father Marcus Walker, the rector of Great St. Bartholomew in London, also condemned the move.

He tweeted: "Funny that people dress up the BBC as a retreat with promising" orchestral versions "of Land of Hope and Glory and Rule Britannia; it's nothing like that, it cores the songs of their words – of their meaning."

Tory MP Michael Fabricant told BBC Radio 4's Today program this morning: “I find all of this very sad, there are some fine words in Rule Britannia, it's not just about Britain being no slaves. You have "other nations that are not so blessed as you must again fall from tyrants while you are to flourish great and freely". Isn't that nice?

& # 39; It was written in 1740. What happened next? There was the War of Austrian Succession that Britain was a part of, but it was also a time when the British allowed Jews and Huguenots overseas citizenship, making Britain a great liberal trading nation.

& # 39; The national anthem is sung and Jerusalem is sung, so it seems like they are trying to pick just these two songs. Self-confident, future-oriented nations do not erase their history, but complement it.

"And Britain's history isn't all bad. We abolished slavery in 1807, more than 50 years before America got there. We could be proud of that." I can live with it (songs sung by a person).

“When you hear some of these opera singers getting it out, I don't think you would say it's a thin voice. Let's just have one voice sing these songs out loud, why not? It's a tradition and a beautiful melody. & # 39;

The songs are part of last night's finale, when traditionally thousands of flag-wingers fill the Royal Albert Hall.

Left-wing critics, however, claim that the lyrics to Rule Britannia, including the line "Britons will never, never, never be slaves", given Britain's prominent role in the slave trade – and also the implication some people might have – are insultingly racist slaves .

The 1902 lyrics of Land of Hope and Glory were supposedly inspired by Cecil Rhodes, an imperialist and mining magnate whose statue is being removed from an Oxford college after protests.

Andrew Griffith criticizes the BBC today

A tweet from Alexander Stafford

Tory MPs Andrew Griffith and Alexander Stafford called on the BBC to reverse their decision not to sing the lyrics of the anthems

Rule Britannia and Land of Hope and Glory are part of last night's finale, which traditionally sees thousands of flag throwers fill the Royal Albert Hall

Rule Britannia and Land of Hope and Glory are part of last night's finale, which traditionally sees thousands of flag throwers fill the Royal Albert Hall

The dispute over this year's Proms schedule began on Sunday when it was reported that Rule Britannia and Land of Hope and Glory would both be dropped.

This year's Last Night conductor, Dalia Stasevska from Finland, was among those who reportedly wanted to reduce the patriotic elements of the event.

She is said to have believed that the lack of an audience was the "perfect moment to bring about change".

But the news sparked a major backlash, and Culture Secretary Oliver Dowden urged the BBC "not to erase our history".

Meanwhile, Laurence Fox tweeted, “I am so honored to be British and part of the incredible and diverse modern nation that we have become.

“Without the past, we would not be where we are today. I wish the BBC would stop hating the UK so much. #DefundTheBBC & # 39 ;.

The lyrics to Land of Hope and Glory

Land of hope and glory

Mother of the free

How shall we praise you?

Who is born of you

Even wider and wider

Do you want to set your limits?

God who made you mighty

Make yourself even more powerful!

Dear land of hope, your hope is crowned

God make you even more powerful!

On Sov & # 39; ran brows, loved, known

Once more your crown is set

Your same laws won through freedom

I have ruled you well and for a long time;

By gaining freedom, by maintaining truth

Your kingdom should be strong

Your fame is as old as the days

As an ocean big and wide:

A pride that dares and does not praise

A strict and silent pride

Not this false joy that dreams contentedly

With what our fathers won;

The blood given out by a hero father

A hero’s son is still annoying

To defuse the series, the BBC bosses announced last night that the last night of September 12th would still contain "familiar, patriotic elements".

It said, "With greatly reduced musical powers and no live audience, the Proms will curate a concert that includes familiar, patriotic elements such as Jerusalem and the national anthem, and bring in new moments that capture the mood of this unique time, including you." ll Never Walk Alone presents a poignant and comprehensive event for 2020.

& # 39; The program will feature a new arrangement by Errollyn Wallen from Hubert Parry's Jerusalem as well as new orchestral versions of Pomp and Circumstance March No. 1 & # 39; Land of Hope and Glory & # 39; (arr. Anne Dudley) and Rule Britannia as part of the Sea Songs included Henry Wood did it in 1905. & # 39;

During a debate on ITV's Good Morning Britain yesterday, freedom of speech campaigner Inaya Folarin Iman insisted that the criticism of the two songs was "absurd" and added that they "bring joy and happiness to many people".

However, Kehinde Andrews, professor of black studies at Birmingham City University, claimed the "Brits must never, never, never be slaves" line of Rule Britannia was "racist propaganda" from the days of the British Empire.

His comments were confirmed by musicians Chi-chi Nwanoku, who formed the first BAME majority orchestra in Europe, and Wasfi Kani, founder of the Grange Park Opera in Surrey, who are also uncomfortable with the line.

Speaking to GMB, Mr Andrews, who said he hadn't seen the Proms, said, “I don't think it's about banning the songs, it's about saying which songs are appropriate.

"The British will never, never, never be slaves" – that is racist propaganda at a time when Britain was the leading slave-trading nation in the world. The idea that we're having this conversation now is a shame. & # 39;

He added, “The fact that the majority of people think this is okay doesn't mean it is okay. This is due to a deficit in our school system that does not teach the horrors of the British Empire. There is nothing to celebrate.

& # 39; Land of Hope and Glory, a much more reasonable name for the song would have been Land of Racism and Servitude. I understand this isn't a catchy song, but that's the nature of the country we're talking about. & # 39;

But Ms. Iman accused Mr Andrews of having a “one-dimensional view of Britain”, adding, “He sees it as a land of racism and hatred and all of these things that are totally and fundamentally separate from what most people are believe in Britain.

“We recognize that there is a complex story of horror and terror, but also triumphs and things uplifting. I think we need to teach history holistically and not try to teach a narrative about cultural self-loathing which I find very divisive.

“I don't think this will help a single ethnic minority life. I find it very hypocritical that a lot of people have no problem with music that talks about stinging and violence and the N-word this and the N-word that, but a song that brings a lot of joy to the British people is kind of a question the censorship. & # 39;

She also argued, “A lot of things are done on behalf of ethnic minorities to protect them and prevent them from being offended when they just don't feel like that and I am spoken for when his song actually brings joy and happiness to many people .

"The majority of people don't listen to the song and say, 'Oh, we want to reintroduce colonialism and slavery. "Songs can take on a new meaning. They are part of a new story that represents pride."

Campaign group Defund The BBC tweeted a video this morning of Dame Vera Lynn singing Land of Hope and Glory

Campaign group Defund The BBC tweeted a video this morning of Dame Vera Lynn singing Land of Hope and Glory

The BLM-sponsored Finnish conductor who "wants to reduce patriotic elements" in Britain's beloved "Last Night of the Proms"

Dalia Stasevska, who conducted last night

Dalia Stasevska, who conducted last night

Dalia Stasevska prepares for the biggest night of her career on September 12th when she conducts the BBC Symphony Orchestra on the final night of the Proms.

But apart from music, the 35-year-old, who moved to Finland from her birthplace in Ukraine at the age of five, is known as a supporter of the Black Lives Matter movement.

In June, when protests against the death of the Black George Floyd were taking place in Minneapolis, Ms. Stasevska tweeted a picture reading: “I stand for equality. I stand against racism. I stand for love and compassion. & # 39;

In June, when protests against the death of George Floyd were taking place in Minneapolis, Ms. Stasevska tweeted the above picture

In June, when protests against the death of George Floyd were taking place in Minneapolis, Ms. Stasevska tweeted the above picture

She uses social media to advocate for race and gender equality, and last month encouraged followers to listen to a BBC Radio 3 debate on classical music and race.

Mrs. Stasevska is pictured with Mr. Lordi, the singer of the heavy metal band Lordi

Mrs. Stasevska is pictured with Mr. Lordi, the singer of the heavy metal band Lordi

Ms. Stasevska is married to the Finnish musician Lauri Porra, who is the bassist of the power metal band Stratovarius and great-grandson of the composer Jean Sibelius.

Speaking to the Guardian in January 2019, she said, “He's the famous one, not me. There is no city or country where it is not recognized! & # 39;

Ms. Stasevska was originally trained as a violinist before developing a love for opera at the age of 13 and switching to conducting in her 20s.

She told the Guardian, “Opera was kind of my punk. My friends listened to the Spice Girls and Backstreet Boys, but I just wanted opera. & # 39;

Dalia Stasevska is married to the Finnish musician Lauri Porra, who is the bass player in the power metal band Stratovarius

Dalia Stasevska is married to the Finnish musician Lauri Porra, who is the bass player in the power metal band Stratovarius

The argument continued today, with TV personality Vanessa Feltz and the argument with Nick Ferrari over This Morning.

Feltz said, “You're not doing it to annoy anyone. You're not doing it to piss off Nick Ferrari Rule Britannia. I am sure people will sing along at home. I think this was an attempt not to cause offense. Is that a bad thing? & # 39;

Ferrari replied: & # 39; I just can't agree.

& # 39; It was the British Royal Navy that put an end to slavery.

“As for the land of hope and fame, or the BBC's awakening and fame, there is no case for it.

& # 39; The BBC has no contact with this country. The BBC basically went into a silo for a campaign. It's there to inform and entertain, and it's been doing music for 90 years. I would argue that the BBC has lost its direction. & # 39;

Feltz then noted the song's connections to the British Empire and added, “One of the lyrics is wider and wider, if you want to set your limits.

In other words, expand your empire.

"You're taking over more and more countries, that's the lyrics." I love this song, I adore it. But if it is deeply hurtful, should it be replaced with an orchestral melody? & # 39;

In the past few days, several prominent leftists have spoken out against the traditional hymns.

Nwanoku, founder of the Chineke! The foundation, which supports aspiring BAME musicians, told The Guardian: "The lyrics are just so offensive. They speak of the 'haughty tyrants' – people we invade their country and call them haughty tyrants – and Britons are never supposed to To be slaves, which implies that it is okay for others to be slaves, but not for us.

“It's so irrelevant to society today. It's been irrelevant for generations and we seem to keep it going. With the BBC talking about Black Lives Matter and their support for the movement, how could you have Rule Britannia as the last concert – in every concert? & # 39;

Ms. Kani also raised concerns about slavery and told BBC Radio 4, “I'm Indian, my parents were from India, I got a wonderful education in the UK, but I don't feel very British when I hear things like That.

"I don't feel very British when people say to me, go home, damn it."

Instead, the musician suggested replacing the songs with I Vow to Thee My Country or The Beatles & # 39; All You Need Is Love.

Ms. Kani, whose parents sought refuge in Great Britain after the partition of India in 1947, also told the Sunday Times, “I don't stop at Land of Hope and Glory and say, 'Thank God I'm British' – that actually makes me feel alienated me.

"Britain raped India and that's what this song celebrates."

Rule Britannia, a poem by the Scottish playwright James Thomson, was set to music by the English composer Thomas Arne in 1740.

But the line "British will never, never, never be slaves" has caused anger among the left over Britain's own role in the slave trade.

Land of Hope and Glory was composed by Edward Elgar and Arthur Benson later added the lyrics in 1902.

The words were reportedly inspired by the colonialist Cecil Rhodes, whose statue was among the statues to be removed by the protests against the Black Lives Matter.

The national anthem will be sung at this year's Proms, which will air on BBC Radio 3 and BBC One, and which will feature soprano Golda Schultz and the BBC Symphony Orchestra.

The BBC said: “The Proms will reinvent the final night of this extraordinary year so that they respect the traditions and spirit of the event and adapt to very different circumstances at this point.

& # 39; With severely reduced musical powers and with no live audience, the Proms will curate a concert that incorporates familiar, patriotic elements such as Jerusalem and the national anthem, and bring in new moments that capture the vibe of this unique time, including "You Will." Never go "Present a poignant and inclusive event for 2020 alone. & # 39;

The last night of the Proms traditionally leads to a celebration of British patriotism that has at times led to criticism from left-wing critics

The last night of the Proms traditionally leads to a celebration of British patriotism that has at times led to criticism from left-wing critics

During the debate on ITV's Good Morning Britain, free speech activist Inaya Folarin Iman said criticisms of Rule Britannia and Land of Hope and Glory were "absurd" and added that they "brought joy and happiness to many people".

During the debate on ITV's Good Morning Britain, free speech activist Inaya Folarin Iman said criticisms of Rule Britannia and Land of Hope and Glory were "absurd" and added that they "brought joy and happiness to many people".

Dalia Stasevska (picture with her violin in September 2012 in Peenemünde) conducts the last night

Dalia Stasevska (picture with her violin in September 2012 in Peenemünde) conducts the last night

So what songs are sung at the proms? The words to Jerusalem and you will never go alone

And did these feet in ancient times

Go for a walk in England's green mountains?

And was the holy Lamb of God

Seen in England's pleasant pastures?

And was the face divine?

Shine on our cloudy hills

And was Jerusalem built here?

Under these dark satanic mills?

Bring me my bow of burning gold!

Bring me my arrows of desire!

Bring me my spear, oh clouds unfold!

Bring me my fire truck!

I won't stop in the mental battle

I don't want my sword to sleep in my hand either

Until we built Jerusalem

In England's green and pleasant country

When you go through a storm

heads up

And don't be afraid of the dark

At the end of a storm

There is a golden sky

And the sweet silver song of a lark

Keep going through the wind

Keep walking through the rain

Though your dreams are thrown and blown

Go on, go on

With hope in your heart

And you will never go alone

You'll never Walk Alone

Go on, go on

With hope in your heart

And you will never go alone, you will never go alone

RICHARD LITTLEJOHN: Welcome to the last night of the Proms, before the age of stupidity redefines them forever

The Notting Hill Carnival is a glorious celebration of the Caribbean heritage of generations of Londoners.

Along with Wimbledon, Royal Ascot and the British Bog Snorkelling Championships, it is one of the highlights of our cultural calendar.

So imagine if someone decided it was "terribly black" and had to be sheared off by their steel bands, dub DJs, jerk chicken stalls and colorful costumes because not only is it the majority of the white population, but all of them Excludes newcomers from Eastern Europe and elsewhere.

There would be an outcry, and rightly so.

The same goes for the Highland Games. What if Wee Burney and her Toytown Tartanistas decreed that throwing a caber and wearing a kilt was against their exciting new hate crime laws?

Over the past few years the Union's flag has been outnumbered last night by those awful blue and yellow EU numbers handed out by unruly remains on the door

Over the past few years the Union's flag has been outnumbered last night by those awful blue and yellow EU numbers handed out by unruly remains on the door

After all, the Scots were the Empire's avid foot soldiers and played a leading role in colonization and the slave trade, as anyone who has seen Carry On Up The Khyber will testify.

I don't want to be the unfortunate Holyrood bureaucrat who had to inform a giant Archie Duncan with a telegraph pole under his arm and six bottles of Stoori Midori liquor on board that his Caledonian persecution is now a criminal offense.

Of course, none of this will happen. The Notting Hill Carnival and Highland Games are not on the Woke Brigade's hit list.

Unfortunately, that can't be said of the Last Night of the Proms, the newest innocuous British institution in the crosshairs.

The BBC has come under pressure to exclude Rule, Britannia and Land Of Hope And Glory from the 2020 Promenade Concerts finale.

Dalia Stasevska, who has the honor of being this year's conductor of Last Night, will "modernize" the repertoire.

Ms. Stasevska from Finland is supposed to believe that the absence of an audience is the ideal time to pull the proms screaming and kicking into the summer of stupidity

Ms. Stasevska from Finland is supposed to believe that the absence of an audience is the ideal time to pull the proms screaming and kicking into the summer of stupidity

Ms. Stasevska from Finland is supposed to believe that the absence of an audience is the ideal time to pull the proms screaming and kicking into the summer of stupidity.

"Dalia is a huge supporter of Black Lives Matter and thinks this is the perfect time to make change happen," said a BBC source.

She apparently has the support of the South African soprano Golda Schultz, who was invited as a soloist on September 12th.

If you're not interested in the traditional Last Night cast, you don't have to go ahead.

There are many other musicians who would be grateful for the work.

Certainly their selection is a testament to the inclusiveness of the Proms, who have bent back, forward, and to the side to showcase music from around the world.

The concerts are not a jingoistic celebration of Little Englander nationalism, but have become a model for modern diversity.

Over the past few years, the Union's flag has been outnumbered last night by those awful blue and yellow EU numbers handed out by unruly remains on the door.

We had to put up with "Refugees Welcome Here" banners gaudily hung from hospitality boxes by self-obsessed show-offs, determined to signal their virtue without the intention of inviting an asylum seeker into their own beautiful homes.

Now we are giving a talk about our evil racist story from a 35 year old from Finland, one of the whitest countries on earth.

Usually their objections are characterized by ignorance of Rule, and Britannia "celebrates" Britain's role in the slave trade.

The Notting Hill Carnival and Highland Games are not on the Woke Brigade's hit list

The Notting Hill Carnival and Highland Games are not on the Woke Brigade's hit list

Someone should explain to her in monosyllabic terms that it was the Royal Navy that ended the slave trade on the high seas.

Sadly, the BBC lacked the backbone to withstand this madness, and they have relegated Rule, Britannia, to part of the Sea Shanty Medley.

Land of Hope and Glory has been pushed back from its usual leading role. And both will only be orchestral versions – no "offensive" lyrics.

Those charged with defending our heritage have proven particularly spineless in the face of the Black Lives Matter onslaught.

Revisionism is the order of the day as the year zero crowd roams through our institutions on the far left, demolishing statues, renaming elementary schools with even the weakest links to slavery, and "decolonizing" university curricula.

The National Trust, which exists to protect and promote our history, now prefers to airbrush the past, replacing real castles with bouncy castles and old tapestries with bold touchscreen experiences tailored for the snowflake generation.

Should this Covid madness ever pass, the promenade concerts will almost inevitably be "realigned" for the age of stupidity next year. You could call it the last night of the proms!

There will be a ban on Union flags, and the Promenaders will fight for leeway with BLM activists in piercing vests and balaclavas, waving clenched fist banners and singing along to rap versions of old favorites.

Overall now:

Land of racists and fascists

Home of the BNP

How we all despise you

It's time to take your knee. . .

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