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BBC proposes warning of "discriminatory language" in Dad's army film


Papa's BARMY: BBC proposes warning of "discriminatory language" on film version of the classic sitcom the French refer to as "frogs".

  • The BBC said some viewers might find the 1971 film "Dad's Army" "offensive"
  • It contains references to the Nazis as well as a line in which the French are called "frogs".
  • The BBC warned of the film that parts of the classic could offend
  • Outraged fans urged the BBC to "stop creating problems if there aren't any".

The BBC has issued a "discriminatory language" warning on the 1971 film "Dad & # 39; s Army".

The BBC aired the film with a warning that some viewers might find it "offensive", leading indignant fans to urge the company to "stop causing problems if there aren't any".

The 1971 film shows the popular Heimgarde train during a training exercise and contains references to the Nazis and a line in which the French are called "frogs".

Lance Corporal Jones – played by Clive Dunn – speaks the legendary saying "You don't like it" in the film.

The BBC issued a warning before it aired that parts of the classic could offend.

The BBC has issued a warning in "discriminatory language" on the 1971 film "Dad & # 39; s Army" (picture).

The BBC aired the film with a warning that some viewers would see it as

The BBC aired the film with a warning that some viewers might find it "offensive", leading indignant fans to urge the company to "stop causing problems if there aren't any".

Viewers who watched the film on the BBC's iPlayer saw the message: "Contains discriminatory language that some find offensive."

Angry fans took to Twitter to express their frustration.

Gavin Moffitt said: "A warning in" discriminatory language "in the original Dad & # 39; s Army film on BBC2? What happened to the world? & # 39;

The BBC issued a warning before the film (a scene, pictured) played, advising that parts of the classic could offend

The BBC issued a warning before the film (a scene, pictured) played, advising that parts of the classic could offend

Abigail Cobley added, "BBC 2 introduces the Dad's Army movie from 1971 as" discriminatory language ". Woah!

“As a big fan of Dad & # 39; s Army, I would like to know which lines exactly! Stop creating problems when there aren't any! & # 39;

Another viewer said: “Before Dad's army, the BBC warned that we might be offended by some of the languages ​​and discriminatory terms used!

"Papa's army is a national treasure while the BBC is a national disgrace."

John Sands wrote: “The BBC warned about the Dad & # 39; s Army film that it contained discriminatory language that could offend some viewers. I despair!

Another fan added: & # 39; The BBC continuity announcer introduces Dad & # 39; s Army the film the BBC way it ever was.

"May contain discriminatory language that some find offensive."

"You mean like you beat up the Nazis?"

Lee Hodgson added, “So Dad's army is discriminatory now? Do we pay our license fee for this? & # 39;

A BBC spokesman told The Sun: "Attitudes have changed significantly and guidelines have been issued based on a certain discriminatory comment."

Viewers who watched the film on the BBC's iPlayer were met with a warning (pictured): "Contains discriminatory language that some find offensive."

Viewers who watched the film on the BBC's iPlayer were met with a warning (pictured): "Contains discriminatory language that some find offensive."

Angry viewers took to Twitter to express their frustration at the inclusion of a warning ahead of the movie "Dad & # 39; s Army"

Angry viewers took to Twitter to express their frustration at the inclusion of a warning ahead of the movie "Dad & # 39; s Army"

The BBC has warned a number of classic programs from a bygone era in the wake of the Black Lives Matters movement – including High Hopes, The League Of Gentlemen, and The Mighty Boosh.

Last year the BBC was accused of "taking political correctness too far" by removing shows like Little Britain and Fawlty Towers from iPlayer for fear of offending modern viewers.

Media Secretary John Whittingdale said that while some 1960s programs were "totally unacceptable" it was the wrong decision to drop comedy classics that were "still widely available".

Last year the BBC was accused of "taking political correctness too far" by removing shows like Little Britain and Fawlty Towers (pictured) from iPlayer for fear of offending modern viewers

Last year the BBC was accused of "taking political correctness too far" by removing shows like Little Britain and Fawlty Towers (pictured) from iPlayer for fear of offending modern viewers

As part of the BLM movement, the BBC removed episodes of the comedy Little Britain (pictured) from their servers

As part of the BLM movement, the BBC removed episodes of the comedy Little Britain (pictured) from their servers

As part of the BLM movement, the BBC removed episodes of the comedy Little Britain from their servers.

Little Britain, starring David Walliams and Matt Lucas, has long been criticized for its portrayal of black and Asian characters by the white comedians, as well as by gay and disabled characters.

A BBC spokesman said he made the decision to remove the show because times have changed since the comedy first aired in 2003.

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