ENTERTAINMENT

BBC journalist "uses anonymous Twitter account to troll Jewish Radio 5 live host Emma Barnett"


The BBC has opened an urgent investigation into one of its senior world news journalists who allegedly used an anonymous social media account to troll Jewish presenter Emma Barnett after she reported on the effects of anti-Semitism on her family.

Nimesh Thaker is accused of using a Twitter account under the pseudonym Not That Bothered to support attacks against the BBC Radio 5 Live presenter.

Ms. Barnett, whose grandmother fled Austria to escape the Nazis, used her program to condemn anti-Semitism following the rapper Wiley's outbreak in July.

She alleged his incendiary comments, which included demanding that Jewish people "crawl out" and defend their "privilege", fueled anti-Semitic abuse online, criticizing Twitter for not removing the musician's shocking posts quickly enough.

Now, screenshots from the Jewish Chronicle show that Mr. Thaker's alleged Twitter account trolled Ms. Barnett after her speech and retweeted a post accusing her of "using the same old" anti-Semitism "excuse when people criticize Israel".

The report also suggested that Israel was a "racist" and "white supremacist state", calling Tony Hall, the BBC's outgoing director general, a "white male Tory".

Mr Thaker, who has worked for the BBC for over 10 years, then used Not That Bothered to contact sources for reports he made for the BBC – apparently disclosing his involvement in the account, the Jewish Chronicle reported.

The BBC World News journalist is currently under investigation by the BBC after a spokesman told MailOnline that it was necessary "Allegations of this kind are extremely serious".

MailOnline asked Mr. Thaker for a comment.

The investigation into Mr Thaker's alleged antics comes ahead of the BBC's shake up by Director General Tim Davie following her role in the Proms fiasco this week.

The BBC has opened an urgent investigation into one of its senior world news journalists who allegedly used an anonymous social media account to attack Jewish presenter Emma Barnett after reporting on the effects anti-Semitism had on her family

Nimesh Thaker is alleged to have used a Twitter account, using the pseudonym Not That Bothered, to support attacks against BBC Radio 5's live host Emma Barnett (pictured) after she followed rapper Wiley's anti-Semitic outbreak in July talked about the Holocaust

Nimesh Thaker is accused of using a Twitter account, using the pseudonym Not That Bothered, to support attacks against BBC Radio 5's live host Emma Barnett (pictured) after she followed rapper Wiley's anti-Semitic outbreak talked about the Holocaust in July

Davie is expected to tell staff this week that journalists must not allow personal politics to affect their work while an in-depth review of social media activities by BBC staff members of the social media activities of To restrict reporters.

In a statement, the BBC told MailOnline: "The BBC takes allegations of this nature very seriously and while we are unable to comment on individual personnel issues, we have strong processes in place to investigate such matters as a matter of urgency."

BBC World is an international broadcaster with an estimated 121 million viewers. It broadcasts news, documentaries and interview shows.

The announcement was praised by Culture Secretary Oliver Dowden, who warned the BBC that it must do more to "maintain its unique selling point of impartiality".

"We are an open and tolerant society and there is no place for anti-Semitism online or offline," Dowden told the Jewish Chronicle today.

& # 39; These allegations are very worrying and we expect BBC journalists, as broadcasters in the country, to adhere to the highest standards of impartiality.

Ms. Barnett had convicted rapper Wiley after saying in an Instagram video, "Crawl out from under your little stones and defend your Jewish privilege."

Twitter was then accused of "ignoring anti-Semitism" as Wiley's tweets were still visible 12 hours after they were first posted.

On her BBC radio show, Ms. Barnett read his tweets aloud and said, “These words burn, I'm sure I don't have to tell most of you, but just in case I do, they burn deep and they are it is deeply disheartening and they play with a very well hidden fear that many Jews have that anti-Semitism will one day reappear because anti-Semitism is fresh and so raw to us. & # 39;

Jewish Chronicle screenshots show that Mr Thaker's alleged Twitter account supported attacks against Ms. Barnett, Israel, and Tony Hall, the outgoing director general of the BBC

Jewish Chronicle screenshots show that Mr. Thaker's alleged Twitter account supported attacks against Ms. Barnett, Israel, and Tony Hall, the outgoing director general of the BBC

Mr Thaker, who has worked for the BBC for over 10 years, used Not That Bothered to contact sources for reports he made for the BBC - apparently disclosing his involvement in the account, the Jewish Chronicle reported

Mr Thaker, who has worked for the BBC for over 10 years, used Not That Bothered to contact sources for reports he made for the BBC – apparently disclosing his involvement in the account, the Jewish Chronicle reported

The report also suggested that Israel was a "racist" and "white supremacist state", calling Tony Hall (pictured), the outgoing BBC director general, a "white male Tory".

The report also suggested that Israel was a "racist" and "white supremacist state", calling Tony Hall (pictured), the outgoing BBC director general, a "white male Tory".

The Jewish Chronicle reported how Mr. Thaker's alleged report, Not That Bothered, supported a series of attacks against Ms. Barnett when people called for a boycott of Twitter after it was delayed in removing Wiley's anti-Semitic posts.

"Has the level of hatred and political smear on Twitter just gone down or are racists on vacation right now?" posted the non-disturbed account.

A post was retweeted by left-wing activist Jackie Walker, who was expelled from Labor last year for "adverse" behavior during an anti-Semitism battle.

Ms. Walker's tweet accused people who wanted a boycott of Twitter after Wiley's anti-Semitic outbreak of being "notorious" for "anti-black / Muslim racism".

On another occasion, Mr Thaker appeared to support the claims made by Canarian editor Kerry-Anne Mendoza, who was also implicated in a series of anti-Semitism.

Not That Bothered retweeted a post from Ms. Mendoza indicating that the "anti-Semitism witch hunt" is heading for a "face-off" with the Black Lives Matters movement.

The fire guard also said, "These anti-black, anti-Palestinian racists are going to let their asses go all over town."

In a post posted on Not That Bothered on July 7th and tweeted on the MediaGuido website, it says, “Guido doesn't like it when black women have an opinion.

"But white men as DG of the BBC are fine."

The reveal comes as Tim Davie begins his expected rework of the BBC, which is accused of "waking up" after its original decision to censor the Land of Hope and Glory and Rule, Britannia lyrics! on the last night of the proms.

The BBC reversed that decision yesterday after more than 100,000 people signed MailOnline's petition to re-record the songs – with lyrics.

The station made a shock statement yesterday at lunchtime and announced that there would now be a "selected group of BBC singers" to perform the songs. It added, "We hope everyone will welcome this solution."

The shock investigation into Mr Thaker's alleged antics comes ahead of Director General Tim Davie's shaking the BBC following her role in the Proms fiasco this week

The shock investigation into Mr Thaker's alleged antics comes ahead of Director General Tim Davie's shaking the BBC following her role in the Proms fiasco this week

Pictured: The audience enjoys the BBC Last Night of the Proms at the Royal Albert Hall. Land of Hope and Glory and Dominion Britannia! will be performed in this year's Last Night Of The Proms

Pictured: The audience enjoys the BBC Last Night of the Proms at the Royal Albert Hall. Land of Hope and Glory and Dominion Britannia! will be performed in this year's Last Night Of The Proms

Downing Street said Boris Johnson – who accused the BBC of "getting wet" – "applauds the decision". Sir Keir Starmer added, "It is the right decision."

A poll for the Mail last week found that 59 percent of Brits believed the station was wrong in the series, rising to 80 percent for those over 65.

A senior BBC executive described the U-turn as "sensible and unsurprising" and said that if Davie, 53, had previously been responsible, "that would have been the original decision."

Mr Davie's swift action is seen as a letter of intent to dispel concerns that the BBC is being dominated by "lively" left politics. He told staff on his first day on Tuesday that the BBC had to represent "every part of this country".

In his surprise statement yesterday, a BBC Proms spokesperson said: "The pandemic means a different Proms this year and one of the consequences under the Covid-19 restrictions is that we are unable to get mass votes together.

For this reason we made the artistic decision not to sing Rule Britannia and Land of Hope and Glory in the (Royal Albert) Hall.

“We thought hard about what else could be possible and we have a solution. Both pieces will now feature a select group of BBC singers.

"This means that the words are sung in the hall and, as we have always made clear, the audience can sing along at home."

The statement added, “Although it can't be a full choir and we can't have an audience in the hall, we do everything we can to make it special and want one last night to really be remembered.

& # 39; We hope everyone will appreciate this solution. We believe that the night itself will be a very special moment for the country – and one that is urgently needed for everyone after a difficult time. It won't be an ordinary last night, but it will be a night not only to look forward to but also to remember. & # 39;

Pictured: Tim Davie, the new BBC General Manager, arrives in Glasgow for his first day in the role at BBC Scotland on September 1, 2020

Pictured: Tim Davie, the new BBC General Manager, arrives in Glasgow for his first day in the role at BBC Scotland on September 1, 2020

"Those words burn deeply": Emma Barnett's powerful response to Wiley's anti-Semitic comments

Good Morning.

I don't know what you're up to on Friday – me? I ate some chippy chips, bread and butter and scampi on my vacation in Norfolk.

Unknown to me, and perhaps to many of you, a guy named Wiley, often referred to as the godfather of filth, a successful musician from east London who was awarded an MBE, started a stream of bad anti-Semitism on social media. Especially Twitter.

Some of his now-removed tweets read like they were straight out of Hitler's playbook of 1930s Nazi Germany – the regime that so valiantly dragged and defeated this country into battle.

Let me give you a taste:

"Jewish people are cowards who do something to me that I am waiting for."

"Jewish people act rough, but they hide behind the police."

& # 39; Who writes the laws? Who changes the laws? Who implements new laws? Who? What are the 5% ers? Who are they all Who rules the world? Who runs the banks? WHO WRITES THE LEGAL BOOK? Who is hiding behind the police? Who does the police belong to? & # 39;

This was Wiley tweeting about Jews …

I caught this news 48 hours later last night when I was on the agenda for this week after my break.

These words burn. I'm sure I don't have to tell most of you, but if I do, they'll burn deeply. They are deeply discouraging and play on a very well hidden fear that many Jews have: that one day anti-Semitism will reappear. Because anti-Semitism is fresh and raw to us.

My grandmother escaped from the Nazis in Wiener Neustadt in Austria and found refuge in this country as a housemaid. My husband's grandmother survived the indescribable torture in Auschwitz. In Europe. A two hour flight from here. I was. He will not. He can't take it.

Our grandmothers, who are sure to read bedtime stories to us in our beds in this country, happened to them – people I met and loved.

Just two weeks ago I opened Twitter on my cell phone and found that “Jewish privilege” was trending. Do you know how that feels How terrifying is that for you? I've had my fair share of abuse online, much of it sexist or politically charged. But the one form of hatred that always stops me and makes me angry and sad and burned? Anti-Semitism.

Today, under the hashtag #NoSafeSpaceForJewHate, there is a Twitter strike by thousands of people around the world. It started at 9 a.m. and lasts 48 hours.

And while there is one very important point to be debated about the role of unregulated social media platforms in acting quickly and removing racist messages – something that Twitter wasn't quick to do in this case (Wiley was also voted for a Week blocked) – something else must not be missing.

Why does a 41-year-old man from enlightened Britain attack Jews?

And he's not alone.

Wiley, if you listen, just in case you need some clarification, Jews don't keep the law. Jews not the banks. Jews don't rule the world. I hate to disappoint you and everyone else who received your memo, but it is not true.

A man who is very successful and has legions of fans – where did he get the anti-Semitic memo from? I am interested in healing society from such racism. But can we? Or do we have to accept that certain people, even those with millions of followers and counselors who can educate, will always be deeply biased?

And to other celebrities who say they are concerned about Wiley and his "episode" I say this: Mental health problems – if there are any in this case – don't make people anti-Semitic.

But what does it do? And can Wiley be cured of it?

Tell me. The microphone is yours.

The BBC's new director general Tim Davie warns "opinion columnists" and "partisan fighters on social media" that they have no place in the company as he outlines his vision of making the broadcaster "completely impartial" in his speech to employees

By Dan Sales for MailOnline

The BBC's new director general has warned staff who want to be columnists or wake up online activists: "You shouldn't be working here."

Tim Davie, who took over this week, said the broadcaster “urgently needs to campaign for impartiality”.

He insisted that his drive was "free from political prejudice, guided by the pursuit of truth, not by any particular agenda".

But it came just days after he did a radical overhaul of the station's comedy production over the coming months for fear that it would be viewed as "too one-sided".

And his recent remarks – widely seen as a blow to the wake-up moderators voiced on Twitter – came after he ordered a U-turn on the last night of the Proms to ban Rule Britannia and Land of Hope and Glory.

The comments came in his first official speech in Cardiff on Thursday afternoon.

He said, “We urgently need to work for impartiality. It's available and it's important.

The BBC's new Director General Tim Davie made his first speech today in his new job

The BBC's new Director General Tim Davie made his first speech today in his new job

“When you work here, nothing should be more exciting than exploring different perspectives, curiously searching for evidence and giving creative testimony.

& # 39; Using our own experiences but not driven by our personal agendas. I wonder if some people worry that impartiality could be a little boring.

“To be clear, it's not about giving up democratic values, like advocating for fair debate or a disgust for racism. But it is about being free from political prejudice, guided by the pursuit of truth, not by any particular agenda.

"If you want to be an opinion columnist or a partisan fighter on social media, this is a valid choice, but you shouldn't be working for the BBC."

Tim Davie, the new BBC General Manager, is coming to Glasgow for his first day in the role at BBC Scotland

Tim Davie, the new BBC General Manager, is coming to Glasgow for his first day in the role at BBC Scotland

Previous TV highlight of the new BBC DG

"If you want to be an opinion columnist or a partisan fighter on social media, this is a valid choice, but you shouldn't be working for the BBC."

“I want a radical shift in our focus from internal to external to focus on those we serve: the public. From Cornwall to Shetland, from Suffolk to County Fermanagh & # 39;

"I want the staff to spend a lot more time outside of the BBC listening to those who pay for us."

"We have to choose our battles carefully and make sure we get the biggest bang for limited dollars."

“It's so easy to roll our eyes when we hear about bureaucracy and domestic politics as if it can't be changed. But we can and should be better. & # 39;

He warned there was "no room for complacency" about the station's future.

The new director general added that it was "still relevant to the lives of millions of people".

But he insisted that “when we look to the future, there is no room for complacency. The truth is that in all of our extraordinary endeavors, there is considerable risk.

& # 39; If current trends continue, we won't feel indispensable enough for our entire audience. We need to evolve to protect what we value.

"The evidence is clear – the future of a universal BBC can no longer be taken for granted."

Mr. Davie is also considering alternative funding options for the organization.

The BBC's current royalty model is guaranteed until 2027 under a royal charter.

However, there is growing speculation that Mr Davie may change the funding model for a new long-term option sooner, reports The Guardian.

The Swedish income tax model is an option, while Mr Davies predecessor Lord Tony Hall previously mentioned an option where the fee is added to the council's tax burden.

Lord Hall's exit after seven years in the role came at a turbulent time for the BBC.

Tim Davies Rise to the BBC's Top Job

Tim Davie was born in 1967 and trained at Whitgift School in Croydon, south London, before studying English at Cambridge University.

He has a background in the private sector and, prior to joining the BBC in 2005, was vice president of marketing and franchise for beverage giant PepsiCo Europe.

When he joined the broadcaster, he became director of marketing, communications and audience in 2005.

He then became director of the BBC's audio and music division in 2008, taking on responsibility for national radio stations, including Radio 1, 2, 3 and 4.

The same year he took the role, Davie faced controversy over a prank call from Russell Brand and Jonathan Ross to actor Andrew Sachs on Radio 2.

Brand left the station after the recorded prank aired, in which he left an obscene message on Sachs' voicemail.

Davie also decided to drop the 6 Music radio station in 2010, a decision that was later reversed.

In 2012 he became Managing Director of BBC Worldwide, a commercial arm of the station.

He then joined the company as general manager in November of that year after George Entwistle left the company following the Jimmy Savile sexual abuse scandal.

He was in office until Lord Tony Hall took office in April 2013.

After Lord Hall became General Manager, Davie returned to BBC Worldwide and oversaw a merger with BBC Studios in 2018. He later became CEO of the manufacturing branch.

The broadcaster is facing an examination of equal pay, diversity, free TV licenses for people over 75 and competition from streaming services such as Netflix and the ongoing coronavirus crisis.

Davie served as acting general manager for four months prior to Lord Hall's appointment following the resignation of George Entwistle in November 2012, and was previously Head of Audio for the company.

Before joining the BBC in 2005, he worked in marketing.

Davie started out when the BBC debated controversially about the decision to play orchestral versions of Rule, Britannia! and land of hope and glory on the last night of the Proms.

The BBC is also expecting Richard Sambrook to report on the use of social media by its staff, including the moderators.

It comes as The Mail revealed on Sunday how a former Downing Street aide is behind a secret new project to set up an "impartial" television news channel that can rival the troubled BBC.

Sir Robbie Gibb, who served as the BBC's senior manager before becoming Theresa May's communications director at # 10, is a pioneer in fundraising for GB News.

The 24-hour station, which is slated to start early next year, is said to benefit from growing dissatisfaction with the BBC. Sources describe it as an antidote to the Woke, Wet Corporation.

Sir Robbie's channel will use standard digital platforms such as Freeview and has already been licensed by the Ofcom broadcaster.

The pressure on the BBC will continue to increase with the development of a second competing news channel from Rupert Murdoch's company News UK, which will likely be streamed online in a manner similar to Netflix.

Sir Robbie's venture comes amid mounting tensions between No. 10 and the BBC. Downing Street says the company is only speaking to a "pro-remain metropolitan bubble" and Boris Johnson accuses the BBC of "being ashamed of our history".

The government regularly boycotts flagship news broadcasts like Radio 4's Today, while Downing Street is also considering accelerating its plans to decriminalize the non-payment of the £ 157.50 per year license fee.

A sure sign that Aunt has turned the dial to "listening": ROBERT HARDMAN is delighted that the BBC has reversed the decision on Rule Britannia and Land of Hope and Glory at the Proms

By Robert Hardman for the Daily Mail

Deep down, Tim Davie may be pretty grateful for anyone who got the idea to remove the words Rule Britannia and Land of Hope and Glory from this year's Last Night of the Proms.

In his first week as director general of the BBC, Mr. Davie was given a very simple, headline-grabbing, and completely free means of standing out in the company.

And it's a decision that has been welcomed by most level-headed people across the country, not least within the BBC.

Because Mr. Davie just heard a national choir run by this paper. He has told the managers of the Proms concerts to bring the traditional words back into the traditional finale.

You did it now. There has been some predictable bleating from predictable areas – a Guardian manager yesterday expressed immediate outrage over the missed opportunity to "end this annual supremacist indulgence once and for all" – but there is (still) no allegation that Mr Davie himself took one Is a racist or a fascist.

Pictured: Sakari Oramo conducts the BBC Symphony Orchestra at the Royal Albert Hall. Rule Britannia and Land of Hope and Glory will return for this year's event

Pictured: Sakari Oramo conducts the BBC Symphony Orchestra at the Royal Albert Hall. Rule Britannia and Land of Hope and Glory will return for this year's event

Rather, he has shown himself to be one who is in tune with what ordinary people think, as opposed to what an enlightened and virtuous minority think they should think.

That must be a good thing, even if it happened in a BBC-esque way.

For the statement heralding yesterday's U-turn, this was both condescending and nonsensical.

"The pandemic means a different proms this year and one of the consequences under the Covid-19 restrictions is that we are unable to get mass voices together," it said.

That's just not true. The original BBC announcement about the Proms said that there would be a soprano and the BBC singers performing last night. If the BBC singers aren't considered "mass voices," what the hell were they doing there anyway?

Pictured: Tim Davie, the new BBC General Manager, arrives in Glasgow for his first day in the role at BBC Scotland on September 1, 2020

It was also announced that the BBC singers would sing the show-tune-with-soccer anthem, "You will never go alone", among other things.

They just wouldn't sing anything that could in any way anger the infallible forces of awakening.

The U-turn from yesterday continued: "This means the words are sung in the hall, and as we have always made clear, the audience can sing along at home."

Well that's pretty decent of them. I am so glad that we can sing freely what we like in our own four walls. Thank you BBC. Spoken like a real aunt.

Lass uns nicht mürrisch sein. Lassen wir uns auch nicht mitreißen. Dies ist jedoch ein sicheres Zeichen dafür, dass die BBC das Einstellrad sehr vorsichtig vom Sendemodus in den Hörmodus umstellt. Und ich kenne viele Leute im Beeb, die sich darüber freuen.

Einige sind BBC-Lifter, entsetzt über diesen sinnlosen Sturm in einer Teetasse und erfreut über eine scheinbar neue Fahrtrichtung. Dies ist immer noch eine weltbeste Organisation, die so oft Maßstäbe in ihrer Radio- und Fernsehausgabe setzt – von den großen Versatzstücken bis zu so vielen Nachrichten, ihrem Drama und, ja, den Proms selbst.

Noch aufregender als die letzte Nacht ist ein weiteres jährliches Ereignis in der Royal Albert Hall, das zwei Monate später stattfindet – das Festival of Remembrance.

Im Bild: Das BBC Symphony Orchestra tritt am letzten Abend des BBC Proms Festivals für klassische Musik in der Royal Albert Hall in London am 12. September 2015 auf

Im Bild: Das BBC Symphony Orchestra tritt am letzten Abend des BBC Proms Festivals für klassische Musik in der Royal Albert Hall in London am 12. September 2015 auf

Jahr für Jahr gehört es zu den kraftvollsten und bewegendsten Produktionen in unserem nationalen Kalender, die nur mit dem konkurrieren können, was am nächsten Morgen im Kenotaph passiert. Was den Weltdienst betrifft, so kann ich mich nur den Worten des Landes der Hoffnung und des Ruhms widersetzen: "Noch weiter und weiter werden deine Grenzen gesetzt werden".

Als gelegentlicher BBC-Mitarbeiter möchte ich, dass es gedeiht. Ich würde es hassen, wenn es langsam durch den Aufstieg von Freilandplattformen wie Netflix korrodiert würde, die auf ihrem Weg von einem feigen Manager unterstützt wurden, der unerbittlich ein jugendliches Publikum verfolgt, das sowieso kein Fernsehen sieht.

Mit anderen Worten, hör auf, dich über den Mittelweg lustig zu machen und umarme sie ein bisschen mehr.

Einige BBC-Trends mögen sich über Mr. Davies früheres Leben in der Marketingabteilung von Pepsi lustig machen, aber es scheint ihm gute Dienste geleistet zu haben. Daher das Wort von innen – das niemand widerlegt hat -, dass er kein "bevorzugtes Pronomen" aus Rücksicht auf Transempfindlichkeiten annehmen wird und dass er die Comedy-Ausgabe der BBC als "zu links" ansieht.

Wenn Sie einige der Antworten in den sozialen Medien lesen möchten, denken Sie, er würde jeden letzten schreienden Komiker zugunsten von Ealing-Komödien und Wiederholungen von Terry und June rund um die Uhr zensieren.

Der Staatssekretär für Kultur, Medien und Sport, Oliver Dowden, der Abgeordnete Rob Butler und der Moderator von Talk Radio, Mike Graham, reagierten positiv auf die Nachricht von der Kehrtwende der BBC

Der Staatssekretär für Kultur, Medien und Sport Oliver Dowden, der Abgeordnete Rob Butler und der Moderator von Talk Radio, Mike Graham, reagierten positiv auf die Nachricht von der Kehrtwende der BBC

Aber jenseits der modischeren Londoner Bezirke, der Glastonbury VIP-Zonen und der After-Partys auf der Award-Rennstrecke herrscht seit langem ein Gefühl der Trennung.

Daher ist es lustig, Witze über den Tod von Margaret Thatcher zu machen, aber Wiederholungen von Little Britain sind nicht erlaubt.

Es ist zum Beispiel akzeptabel, dass Frankie Boyle – wie 2017 – eine BBC2-Show moderiert, in der er sagte, das Feuer im Grenfell Tower sei "schlimmer" als der Mord an den Tories, der Brexit sei "Weihnachten für Rassisten" und dass Jeremy Corbyn "mich hoffnungsvoll macht".

Als Jeremy Clarkson die Mexikaner auf demselben Kanal als "faul" bezeichnete, wurde er gerügt und zum Widerruf gezwungen, während die BBC dem mexikanischen Botschafter eine formelle Entschuldigung übermittelte. Ich möchte nicht, dass Frankie Boyle aus der Luft geht, und ich bin mir sicher, dass Mr. Davie dies auch nicht tut. Aber die Zuschauer müssen während der bevorstehenden Kulturkriege ein größeres Gleichgewicht spüren.

Nach Jahrzehnten dieser Art braucht die Öffentlichkeit keinen Tory-Backbencher – oder sogar einen weisen BBC-Insider wie Andrew Neil -, um sie vor einer voreingenommenen Londoner / liberalen Tendenz zu warnen. Sie haben es sowieso durch Osmose aufgenommen.

That same narrow mindset came close to removing Rule Britannia from the Proms – and who knows what thereafter.But based on the evidence so far – and it is, admittedly, early days – Mr Davie seems willing to stand his ground.

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