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BBC bosses are faced with the use of royalty cash to fund lewd and childish podcasts


The BBC bosses are faced with the use of royalty cash to fund lewd and childish podcasts that poke fun at the Prime Minister's covid illness, discuss sexual acts and even “poo-related mishaps”.

  • The BBC bosses were faced with offensive shows aimed at young audiences
  • The podcasts in the BBC Sounds app contain graphical and explicit discussions
  • Tory MP Peter Bone pointed out that those over 75 are now paying for these podcasts
  • Available ones include Wheel of Misfortune and Too Rude For Radio

The BBC bosses faced a backlash last night for using royalty payers' money to fund lewd and childish podcasts.

The company's new chairman was urged to address the issue after the offensive shows for young viewers became public on the BBC Sounds app.

This includes graphic discussions about self-wetting people, details of explicit social media messages, and blatant conversations about the prime minister's genitals.

Other podcasts, riddled with foul language and sexually explicit descriptions, cover shoddy public transport connections, lengthy discussions about specific sexual acts, and an entire episode devoted to defecation.

Much of the content is too objectionable to describe.

Wheel of Misfortune is available on BBC Sounds and includes a warning that says "You should listen anyway". It offers lengthy discussions about people self-wetting, including the use of graphical sexual language

The company's new chairman was urged to address the issue after the offensive shows for young audiences became known on the BBC Sounds app

The company's new chairman was urged to address the issue after the offensive shows for young viewers became public on the BBC Sounds app

Tory MP Peter Bone pointed out that those over 75 who lost their free TV license are now paying for the podcasts. He added, "I am sure the majority of young people would find what they are talking about quite offensive."

The conservative colleague Giles Watling, who sits on the committee for digital, culture, media and sport, described the BBC bosses as "morally irresponsible".

Information on the BBC website suggests that podcasting can cost anywhere from £ 1,000 to £ 8,000 per episode.

The BBC, unlike its radio shows, does not publish audience numbers for podcasts, so it is not known how many listeners they attract. Available on BBC Sounds include Wheel of Misfortune, in which comedians Alison Spittle and Fern Brady tell "their funniest and most embarrassing stories." One episode is dedicated to the topic of feces and another to the topic of "p ** s".

Ex-Radio 1Xtra presenter "Dotty", real name Ashley Charles, presents the podcast Too Rude For Radio

Ex-Radio 1Xtra presenter "Dotty", real name Ashley Charles, presents the podcast Too Rude For Radio

Too Rude For Radio included a six-minute discussion on how much money a guest on the show would have to pay to keep the prime minister's genitals and for how long

Too Rude For Radio included a six-minute discussion on how much money a guest on the show would have to pay to keep the prime minister's genitals and for how long

The program contains a warning, but then adds "You should listen anyway". It offers lengthy discussions about people self-wetting, including the use of graphical sexual language.

A separate episode is described on BBC Sounds as "Fern, Alison, and Phil Share Their Funniest Feces-Related Mishaps". Aptly named Too Rude For Radio – before ex-Radio 1Xtra host & # 39; Dotty & # 39 ;, real name Ashley Charles – included a six-minute discussion about how much money a guest on the show would have to pay to get the Prime Minister to hold genitals and how long. It also contained degrading references to the fact that Boris Johnson suffered from Covid-19.

In another episode, Theresa May was discussed in a sexual context and talked about sex in public transport.

Tory MP Peter Bone pointed out that those over 75 who lost their free TV license are now paying for the podcasts

Tory MP Peter Bone pointed out that those over 75 who lost their free TV license are now paying for the podcasts

One series called "Slide Into My Podcast" included sexually explicit conversations between presenters about the "DMs" or direct messages they received through social media. The Unexpected Fluids podcast series is devoted to embarrassing stories about sex.

Mr Bone said, “The vast majority of Britons will think this stuff is either rubbish or obscene. I hope the new chairman of the BBC will address this and review this totally inappropriate expenditure.

"Those over 75 now have to pay for this type of tosh."

Mr Watling said the BBC "tried everything" to target a younger audience, adding, "I think they lost the plot."

A BBC spokesman said: "Creating audio that is relevant to young listeners is part of our public service role. This includes, rightly, podcasts that discuss relationships and examine real-world problems."

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