ENTERTAINMENT

B & M Bargains in Wales is covering up merchandise amid "fire breaks" but Christmas decorations are fine


A bargain store in Swansea asks its customers to use their own discretion to determine which items are “not material” as their employees cannot challenge them.

The Parc Tawe B&M store has signs on display asking shoppers to assess which goods they think are not strictly necessary.

Many goods, including toasters, kettles, bedspreads, wrapping paper and children's toys, were classified as non-essential by the Welsh government during the 17-day fire lock that went into effect at 6 p.m. on Friday 23 October.

Customers in the Parc Tawe B&M store (picture) can buy wrapping paper without arguing with the Welsh "Trolley Police".

The majority of supermarkets have actively blocked portions of their stores with large plastic covers, but the Parc Tawe B&M store has taken responsibility for its customers and uses their common sense.

While some products are covered with large plastic sheeting, others such as wrapping paper are displayed in the store.

The signs on the shelves read, "Please only buy essential goods. Colleagues in B&M stores are not authorized to challenge the public. Therefore, we ask buyers to correctly judge what is important."

Signs in the B&M store in Swansea say it's up to the customer, too

Signs in the B&M store in Swansea say it is up to the customer to "judge" which items are not strictly necessary

B&M asks customers for "non-essential" points that employees cannot challenge them

B&M asks customers for "non-essential" points that employees cannot challenge them

Customers can currently purchase Halloween costumes, Christmas decorations, stationery, greeting cards, and children's toys.

All of these items fall under the Welsh Government's “non-essential” list of goods.

B&M stores carry a wide range of products, including groceries and toiletries, which are considered essential and therefore allowed to be sold while the breaker is shut down.

In a tweet posted over the weekend, First Secretary Mark Drakeford said the Welsh government would be reviewing how the weekend went to ensure that common sense is being applied to the ban on the sale of "non-essential" items.

But since the lockdown four days ago, backlash has picked up pace and thousands of people are angry about what they can and can't buy under the "non-essential" umbrella.

Customers have reacted with confusion that alcohol is considered "essential" but school uniforms, vacuum cleaners and hair dryers are not.

To add fuel to the fire, Welsh "trolley police" sparked further outrage after women in Tesco were told they could not buy sanitary napkins – because they were "non-essential" items.

Details of the exceptional restriction were tweeted online by the supermarket following a complaint from a shopper known only as Katie from the Cardiff store.

It sparked a brief disagreement between Tesco and the Welsh government, who held each other responsible for the debacle.

Katie had written, & # 39; Can you explain why I was told today that I can't buy period pads as I'm sure they are important for women? !!! But I can buy alcohol, it doesn't make sense. & # 39;

In a now-deleted post, Tesco responded, “We understand how frustrating these changes will be for our Welsh customers.

"However, the Welsh government has instructed us not to sell these items for the duration of the fire lockdown."

Katie wasn't the only customer denied toiletries.

Customer Nichola-Louise Smith found the sanitary napkin department at the Tesco store in St. Mellons, Cardiff, closed.

Nichola-Louise Smith found the sanitary napkin department at the Tesco store in St. Mellons, Cardif, closed

Nichola-Louise Smith found the sanitary napkin department at the Tesco store in St. Mellons, Cardif, closed

It prompted the agency to step in and make a concise statement that the supermarket, whose location is not known, was wrong.

The Welsh Government insisted: “This is wrong – products from the time are essential.

“Supermarkets can still sell items that can be sold in pharmacies. Only the sale of essential items during the break is intended to prevent more time than necessary from being spent in stores. It shouldn't prevent you from accessing the items you need. & # 39;

Some products in the B&M store are covered with large plastic sheets to deter customers from buying

Some products in the B&M store are covered with large plastic sheets to deter customers from buying

Tesco apologized, saying pictures of barriers near the items were actually only present after a police incident that had nothing to do with the new rules.

A petition calling for an end to the restriction has attracted more than 50,000 signatures since the fire broke out last week.

Critics said the ban was "disproportionate and cruel," indicating that shoppers will be forced to buy products online, with the only person to benefit from it being Amazon owner Jeff Bezos.

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