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"Annoyed" public finds ways to break the rules as officials are accused of pursuing "simple goals".


Annoyed members of the public are getting sick and tired of the strict lockdown and finding ways to break the rules, a deputy police chief warned today – as officials in Whitby have banned sledding.

The resort's armed forces struck after people reportedly went to nearby areas to enjoy themselves in the snow.

It says: “We are receiving reports that people are traveling to Goathland and the surrounding areas to go sledding.

"This is in conflict with current lockdown and government policies on necessary travel, and the public should not attend and risk a fine."

In the south, officials discovered two families in which so many cars had driven 150 miles from Coventry to Dorset to go to the beach.

The sightseers had driven from the town of East Midlands to the picturesque Lulworth Estate in Dorset just to pass their day.

However, some police forces have come under fire for policy enforcement despite Home Secretary Priti Patel backing their actions.

Two 27-year-old friends Jessica Allen and Eliza Moore were fined £ 200 for walking five miles from their home with a cup of picnic tea officers.

But the hundreds of crowds lining the streets of Crosby to play the local team's FA Cup game against Tottenham Hotspur on Saturday saw no punishment.

It came as:

  • A visitor was fined after eating a kebab in his car Cheddar Gorge
  • A landlord was approached after giving a beer to a delivery man
  • Police stopped a woman who was driving from Staffordshire to Wales for a beach trip
  • A pretty village in Gateshead "raided" by non-locals walking
  • Rush hour traffic in Lockdown London reached its highest level ever
  • People have been reported after exercising at a Nuneaton gym

Police officers were stunned when they found two loads of cars from Coventry residents in Dorset

Crowds of football fans in Crosby before the Spurs-Marine clash were not penalized

Crowds of football fans in Crosby before the Spurs-Marine clash were not penalized

At Gateshead, hundreds of additional visitors flocked to the area for unhindered walking

At Gateshead, hundreds of additional visitors flocked to the area for unhindered walking

Jessica Allen and Eliza Moore, both 27, alleged officials were looking for a way to punish them

Jessica Allen and Eliza Moore, both 27, alleged officials were looking for a way to punish them

Members of the public wondered why officials appeared to hit individuals harder than some groups.

Gary Blackburn said, “If they want people to be banned completely, they should say so instead of hiding behind leaks and the police.

"It is pathetic to arrest or punish simple targets for walks with a coffee, etc."

Another added: “The problem is that we no longer feel that the police are on our side

& # 39; The different monitoring of the BLM marches and the anti-lockdown marches has shown that a two-stage monitoring is taking place

“The police seem to have easy targets. Like bullies. & # 39;

Hardyal Dhindsa, Police Commissioner and Crime Commissioner for the Derbyshire Police Department, admitted that officials "may be doing something wrong" in fining a violation of the rules and that a recent incident in the county could have been treated differently.

Speaking to BBC Breakfast, he said the officials had a "very difficult job in really difficult circumstances," with the "constantly changing" Covid-19 restrictions.

He said, "It is no wonder that under such circumstances, they are sometimes wrong in trying to do the best job possible."

When asked if it was wrong, he said, “After looking at it and hearing what I know, it looks like we might have handled it differently.

Hardyal Dhindsa, Police and Crime Commissioner for the Derbyshire Police Department

Paul Netherton, Deputy Chief of Police for Devon and Cornwall Police

Hardyal Dhindsa and Paul Netherton have both said the public is getting tired of the lockdown

Colin Robinson, the landlord of the Chestnut Tree Inn pub in Worcester, was visited by the police

Colin Robinson, the landlord of the Chestnut Tree Inn pub in Worcester, was visited by the police

Mr Robinson said he gave a delivery man a beer and then visited by officials

Mr Robinson said he gave a delivery man a beer and then visited by officials

What is a "reasonable excuse" to go outside? And can the police force their way into your house if they suspect that the rules are being broken?

According to the rules in England, you can only leave your home if you have a "reasonable excuse". This is regulated by law.

The police can take action against you if you leave the house without a “reasonable apology” and impose a fine (permanent complaint).

You can get a fixed penalty of £ 200 for the first offense, which doubles to a maximum of £ 6,400 for further offenses.

A "reasonable apology" includes:

  • Work – You can only leave home for work if it is inappropriate for you to do your work from home
  • Volunteering – You can also leave home to do volunteer or community service
  • Essential Activities – You can leave home to buy things in stores or get services. You can also leave home to do these things on behalf of a disabled or vulnerable person, or someone who is self-isolating
  • Education and Childcare – You can only leave home for education, registered childcare, and supervised activities for children that you are eligible to attend.
  • Meeting with Others and Care – You can leave home to visit people in your support bubble (if you are legally entitled to form one), to informally care for children under the age of 14 under a child care bubble (e.g. to To enable parents to work) to look after disabled or vulnerable people
  • Exercise – You can continue to exercise alone, with someone else, or with your household or support bladder and not outside of your area. The government advises you to exercise only once a day, but the law doesn't restrict it.
  • Medical Reasons – You can leave home for medical reasons, including a COVID-19 test for medical appointments and emergencies
  • Harm and Compassionate Visits – You can leave the house to be with someone who is giving birth, to avoid injury or illness, or to avoid the risk of harm (such as domestic violence).
  • You can also leave the house to visit someone who is dying, someone in a nursing home (if this is permitted under the guidance of the nursing home), a hospice or hospital, or to accompany them to a doctor's appointment
  • Animal welfare reasons – You can leave your home for animal welfare reasons, e.g. B. To contact a veterinary service for advice or treatment
  • Communal Worship and Life Events – You can leave your home to attend or attend a place of worship for communal worship, funeral or event related to a death, burial site or memorial garden, or to attend a wedding ceremony.

There are other reasonable excuses.

For example, you may leave your home to comply with legal obligations or to engage in activities related to buying, selling, renting or renting residential property, or when it is reasonable to vote in an election or referendum.

In Scotland, coronavirus legislation gives the police the power to force people into people's homes if these rules are violated.

In England, however, they can only enter under "exceptional circumstances" even if they believe someone inside is contagious.

Otherwise they need an arrest warrant.

"But it's an operational matter. I've asked the police chief to look into these cases. If the police have acted in error, the fines can be waived by them."

He said that if a mistake was found the police were "big enough" to apologize.

“When the police come into contact with the public, the public is essentially very compliant and following orders.

"When you think of the hundreds and thousands of calls to the police in Covid-19, the number of criminal charges identified is low.

“The problem is how the lockdown rules and regulations apply, and the review of those rules needs to be considered.

& # 39; This lockdown is not the same as the March lockdown.

“If you look at the traffic on our streets, it's still pretty high because people are still going to work.

"The activity on your streets and in our rooms is much more than the lockdown we had in March."

Paul Netherton, deputy chief of police for Devon and Cornwall Police, said people are fed up with lockdown restrictions and public compliance has fallen.

"What happens is that people start disobeying the rules, they're starting to think about how I can get away with the rules," he told BBC Breakfast.

When asked if it was more difficult to get people to comply with the rules of the current lockdown, he said, “Yeah, I think people are getting tired of it.

"I can understand that, but we have to be firm, we have to save lives, we have to make sure that people stay separate, isolate themselves and stay at home."

Ms. Allen and Ms. Moore said this morning that they had no idea they'd done anything wrong.

Their fine, which is being reviewed, has not yet been sent to them after the excitement.

Eliza said of the police when they approached them to ask questions, “I think their ultimate goal was to fine us. They were looking for information that could justify us breaking the rules. & # 39;

Jessica continued, “After interviewing them, they read us our rights. As two people who are law abiding citizens, you absolutely fear that I never meant to be on the wrong side of the law. They read our rights and said that whatever we say will be kept as evidence and later used in court. And I just remember looking at Eliza and thinking, "How did that happen?"

Home Secretary Priti Patel has helped police take tough action on the pandemic.

She said over the weekend: “The vast majority of the public supported this enormous national effort and followed the rules.

"However, the tragic number of new cases and deaths this week shows that when people are clearly breaking these rules, strong enforcement remains necessary to ensure our country recovers from this deadly virus."

“Enforcing these rules saves lives. It's that simple. Officials will continue to engage with the public across the country and will not hesitate to take action if necessary. & # 39;

Warwickshire Police also announced today how many Covid fines had been imposed and for what reasons.

These included two people who were reported after training at a Nuneaton gym on Friday afternoon.

After a report of a house party in Nuneaton on Friday night, people were reported for fines and a householder signed up for a party of 15 to 20 people in Polesworth on Saturday.

There were also three people who got into trouble after having visitors in their homes.

Meanwhile, a landlord who hands out free meals to the homeless was visited by authorities after handing out a free beer in the latest example of strong national lockdown enforcement.

Chopwell Wood in Gateshead was visited by numerous visitors over the weekend

Chopwell Wood in Gateshead was visited by numerous visitors over the weekend

Local resident Steph Davies Morely described the Flood online as "selfish and sad"

Local resident Steph Davies Morely described the Flood online as "selfish and sad"

Don't stop chatting with friends, says Minister

A minister today attacked people breaking the lockdown by stopping to chat with friends they met during training.

Nadhim Zahawi was alarmed this morning in a round of interviews about the pictures of people who had gathered in parks over the weekend.

The vaccines minister declined to offer any guarantee that the current “tough” lockdown restrictions are adequate and raised concerns from those who do not follow the rules in supermarkets or exercise outside.

When asked if the current restrictions are sufficient, he told BBC Radio 4's Today program: “We don't want to take tougher measures, the lockdown is tough, schools are closed, but it's important to remember that this virus loves social interactions.

“We are reviewing all the restrictions, but these are pretty difficult right now.

“I worry about supermarkets and people who actually wear masks and follow the one-way system and make sure they wait outside the supermarket when capacity is full.

"I'm worried about some of the pictures I've seen of social interactions in parks. If you need to exercise, all you can do is exercise."

Mr Zahawi said if people outside their homes should keep in mind that any interaction presents an opportunity for the virus to spread.

Colin Robinson, the landlord of the Chestnut Tree Inn pub on Lansdowne Road, said the police had been called into the pub and the officers took his name down before leaving.

He told Worcester News, “Yes, we had two people here. One person delivered a barrel of beer, one made music in the recording studio. I gave the guy a beer because he brought back a keg he owed me and the other was up with the music system. & # 39;

In Gateshead, a village was flooded with visitors walking in picturesque Chopwell Wood.

The streets were full of cars, even though the guidelines told people to stay where they were.

Local Steph Davies Morely said, “So selfish and sad! As someone who shields me, I am honestly broken to see that. & # 39;

In Wales, a woman was caught breaking coronavirus rules after traveling nearly 70 miles from Staffordshire to North Wales to “go to the beach”.

The police initially stopped the woman in Prestatyn after her "driving style" caught the officers' attention.

It was about 67 miles from Newcastle-under-Lyme in Staffordshire.

After talking to the driver, police officers said they found she did not have a full driver's license and was driving without insurance.

The vehicle was confiscated and officials reported the driver for three crimes including driving without a license, driving without insurance and violating Covid-19 regulations.

North Wales Police said: “We noticed this vehicle because of the way it was driving.

The vehicle had driven from Newcastle-under-Lyme to Prestatyn because the driver wanted to go to the beach.

It also turned out that she had no insurance and only a temporary license. Vehicle confiscated and reported for three crimes. & # 39;

A visitor was fined after eating a kebab in one of the most beautiful spots in the southwest.

Avon and Somerset police officers patrolled Cheddar Gorge over the weekend to enforce the national lockdown and look out for rule violations.

In a tweet on Saturday evening, the armed forces' Sedgemoor team said "multiple vehicles were distributed" and seven people were fined for violating COVID-19 legislation.

The tweet added, “Traveling from Bristol to Cheddar to eat kebabs in your vehicle is not a reasonable excuse! Stay safe & # 39;

The police did not state whether the driver traveled alone or whether there were passengers.

As part of the current national coronavirus lockdown, people are once again urged to stay home to protect the NHS and save lives.

While people travel from all over to visit Cheddar Village and walk the gorge, people should only go there if they are there.

The coronavirus rules state: "You are only allowed to leave your home if you have a reasonable excuse (e.g. for work or educational purposes).

Kebabs were attacked again in the Cheddar Gorge at the weekend

Kebabs were attacked again in the Cheddar Gorge at the weekend

Everyone in England is told to stay home and act like you have it in a major advertising campaign. including posters (pictured) encouraging the public to control the spread of the virus, protect the NHS and save lives

Everyone in England is told to stay home and act like you have it in a major advertising campaign. including posters (pictured) encouraging the public to control the spread of the virus, protect the NHS and save lives

"If you do need to travel, stay where you are – that is, do not travel outside of your village, town, or part of a town you live in – and try to reduce the total number of trips you make to reduce."

Exercising outdoors is one of the “reasonable excuses” the government uses as a reason for leaving the home.

However, the government advises: “This should be done locally if possible.

"You can travel a short distance in your area to do this if necessary (e.g. to gain access to an open space)."

Restaurants and cafes will have to close under national lockdown, but takeaway food and drinks and deliveries are still allowed.

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