ENTERTAINMENT

Anger and confusion over what counts as "essential" retail in New Lockdown, England


Anger and confusion has arisen today over new lockdown restrictions, which means garden centers and pet stores can stay open while other retail stores must close.

Thousands of chain and independent retailers have been ordered to close their stores across England for the third time.

The new lockdown ordinance, resulting from the national lockdowns in March and November, is taking place amid rising numbers of Covid infections and deaths across the country.

However, some shopkeepers have lamented the harsh new restrictions that all non-essential shops will be closed until at least mid-February.

While florists, clothing stores, and bookstores have been classified as non-essential and must now close, those deemed essential, such as garden centers and pet stores, are allowed to stay open.

On some major streets, such as Haslemere, Surrey, shoppers can purchase toys for their dogs and cats, but not their young children.

High street shoppers can also take their dog to a groomer – for urgent welfare needs – but they cannot get their hair cut or groom themselves.

It has led some shopkeepers to come across the "inconsistency" of the rules while others have labeled it "frustrating".

Thousands of chain and independent retailers have been ordered to close their stores across England for the third time as Covid infections and deaths rise. Pictured: An empty Haslemere in Surrey today with tabs showing which stores are open and which are closed

Ian Rowley had to adapt to a click-and-collect service at the Haslemere Bookshop seven years after his acquisition, even though WHSmith was only allowed to stay open a few doors

Ian Rowley had to adapt to a click-and-collect service at the Haslemere Bookshop seven years after his acquisition, even though WHSmith was only allowed to stay open a few doors

60-year-old Australian citizen Helen Dillon, who runs David's clothing store, said the rules were "bizarre".

60-year-old Australian citizen Helen Dillon, who runs David's clothing store, said the rules were "bizarre".

Shops in Haslemere, Surrey today had sales signs on their windows - for the usual January bonanza - but had to close due to Covid restrictions

Shops in Haslemere, Surrey today had sales signs on their windows – for the usual January bonanza – but had to close due to Covid restrictions

The shops, florists, pharmacies and dry cleaners that are open or closed in Haslemere today

The Georgian Hotel (OPEN)

Vision Express (OPEN)

Darnleys (CLOSED)

The Haslemere Bookshop (OPEN – but closed)

Pizza Express – (CLOSED)

Seymours (OPEN)

The shoebox (CLOSED)

SpaceNK (CLOSED)

Marley Flowers (CLOSED)

Heidi (CLOSED)

Brewer Decorators (OPEN)

The Swan Inn (CLOSED)

The Haslemere Pet Co (OPEN)

Mooeys (CLOSED)

Plum (CLOSED)

Davids (CLOSED)

ANYA (CLOSED)

Henry Adams (OPEN)

Scope (CLOSED)

Magic Scissors (CLOSED)

Luigi (CLOSED)

Hemingways (CLOSED)

D&A Hair Design (CLOSED)

Amazing Grace (CLOSED)

Costa (OPEN)

Collingwood Batchelor (CLOSED)

Boots (OPEN)

Oasis (CLOSED)

Liphook Valet Service (OPEN)

Warren Powell-Richards (OPEN)

Lloyd & # 39; s Pharmacy (OPEN)

Keats (OPEN)

The white horse (CLOSED)

Raymond Reid Photo (CLOSED)

Hamptons (OPEN)

A shopkeeper who runs a clothing store in Haslemere described the rules as "bizarre". 60-year-old Australian citizen Helen Dillon, who runs David's store, said, “Why are pet stores more important than my clothing store?

“Animals have to be fed, but they can get their food and toys in the supermarkets, that's bizarre.

“In a smaller company, you can be more careful with Covid, and that annoys me.

“We only opened the store in July 2019 and it's been a slippery slope ever since. We are expected to open again when I can hold on to my fingernails.

"I was planning to make a massive sale in late January, but that won't happen now because we are locked again."

However, one pet store owner said it saved taxpayers money by keeping his store open while in lockdown.

Ray Murphy, 50, who has owned Haslemere Pet Shop for 15 years, said: “We are consistently open to what concerns me, saves taxpayers money and provides essential service to those with pets and livestock who need to be fed.

"The main difficulty is that people come in with kids because they have to stick together to count as one, but kids run around touching things. That's how the virus spreads."

Meanwhile, seven years after his acquisition, Ian Rowley had to adapt to a click-and-collect service at The Haslemere Bookshop, even though WHSmith was only allowed to remain open a few doors.

He said: “We have had to adapt dramatically since Covid-19, we had to become a virtual bookstore that offers a click and pickup service. It has had a profound impact on the way we work and how we work.

& # 39; This lock is just Groundhog Day, it's not really any different from any other lock.

“It's a little strange that WHSmiths – who sell books – can stay open, but we can't. We don't compete with online services like Amazon for price, but for service and recommendations.

“On the positive side, it was much easier for independents to adapt than for chains because we can talk about something in the morning and then do it. While chain companies along this main drag can't make these decisions, they have to go through headquarters. & # 39;

Outside of Haslemere, other shopkeepers have also raised concerns.

A barber chain owner with locations in Hampshire, Dorset and Wiltshire said the rules were "frustrating".

Dan Champion, who runs Champion Barbers, told MailOnline, “There are things like pet shops and real estate agents that can stay open – and they can't even show people around, it's a little weird.

“I also tried to buy a card the other day and went to the independent card store, but it was closed so I had to go to a supermarket.

& # 39; It was way busier than the card shop would have been

"And one of my employees recently told me that they went shopping and saw a lot of elderly people in an open-air market. That must be a risk."

The 45-year-old father of two, who has run his business for eight years, said the third ban was "difficult" for him and his employees, many of whom are self-employed.

He said, “In some ways it's good because where we had different businesses in different counties, we had different rules, but it's difficult for our people.

Ray Murphy, 50, who has owned Haslemere Pet Shop for 15 years, said opening his store saved taxpayers money

Ray Murphy, 50, who has owned Haslemere Pet Shop for 15 years, said opening his store saved taxpayers money

He told MailOnline: “We have been consistently open about what concerns me, saves taxpayers money and provides an essential service for those with pets and livestock who need to be fed.

He told MailOnline: “We have been consistently open about what concerns me, saves taxpayers money and provides an essential service for those with pets and livestock who need to be fed.

Lockdown 3: Which Non-Essential Companies Need to Close?

Non-essential retail stores such as clothing and homeware stores, vehicle showrooms (excluding rentals), betting shops, tailors, tobacco and vape stores, electronic goods and cellphone stores, auction houses (except for auctions of livestock or farm equipment), and market stalls for non essential goods. (These venues can continue to operate click-and-collect off-premises and delivery services.)

Eating places such as cafes, restaurants, pubs, bars and clubs (they may remain open for takeout and delivery of food and soft drinks).

Accommodation such as hotels, hostels, guest houses and campsites,

Leisure and sports facilities such as leisure centers and fitness studios, swimming pools, sports fields, fitness and dance studios, riding arenas in riding centers, climbing walls and golf courses.

Entertainment venues such as theaters, concert halls, cinemas, museums and galleries, casinos, amusement arcades, bingo halls, bowling alleys, ice rinks, go-karting venues, indoor game and soft play centers and areas (including inflatable parks and trampoline centers), circuses, Exhibition centers, fairs, water parks and theme parks

Animal attractions (such as zoos, safari parks, aquariums and nature reserves)

Indoor attractions in places like botanical gardens, mansions, and landmarks – although the outdoor area may remain open for exercise.

Personal care facilities such as hair, beauty, tanning and nail salons. Tattoo studios, spas, massage parlors, body and skin piercing services must also be closed. Nor can they be done in private houses.

Community centers and halls.

“I had to let some go earlier this year because of social distancing. I had seven in one of my stores, but I had to cut that down to three to allow social distance between the chairs.

“My biggest concern is at the end of it all. I took out some of the bounce-back loans, but if I have to pay them back I'll be in debt, no savings, and potentially higher taxes. & # 39;

Faye Louise, who runs the Forest Pet Supplies Store in Ringwood, feels lucky to be able to stay open and does not agree to the division of essential and non-essential businesses

The mother of one child told MailOnline: “The rules are just so complicated.

“It is so wrong that you can buy a coat for your dog but not for your child. Of course, you can still buy online, but it's still wrong. They don't think about the special needs of children.

“I think it's unfair that some places are allowed to stay open and others aren't. If pet stores are essential, why not kids clothing stores?

However, the 27-year-old from Ringwood said she believed the suspension was "definitely necessary".

She added, "We are very lucky that we have been able to remain open and are considered essential as others are not so lucky."

Wendy Lowen, who visited the store to buy groceries for her Jack Russell, agreed that what is deemed essential varies from person to person.

Across the street from Forest Pet Supplies is Patricia & # 39; s Florist, who had to adjust their business model to only take orders by phone and Click & Collect, although garden centers could stay open.

Owner Patricia Taylor said, “We've mostly been clicking and collecting since the initial lockdown, but it's confusing when people are told to come to collect flowers but also to stay home.

“I don't think it's fair that garden centers can stay open.

“My customers still want to visit the store, and I had to take some employees off because we can't stay open.

Even before the lockdown was announced last night, our doors were closed, and doors were closed for the entire Christmas period.

“It's difficult because we're not considered essential, but the wine shop next door is still allowed to open for pickup and delivery.

“Does this mean that wine is considered essential? The rules are all very strange. & # 39;

Faye Louise (pictured), who runs the Forest Pet Supplies Store in Ringwood, says she feels lucky to be able to stay open and disagrees with the division of essential and non-essential businesses

Faye Louise (pictured), who runs the Forest Pet Supplies Store in Ringwood, says she feels lucky to be able to stay open and disagrees with the division of essential and non-essential businesses

Across the street from Forest Pet Supplies is Patricia & # 39; s Florist (Photo: Owner Patricia Taylor), who had to adapt her business model to accept orders only by phone and Click & Collect, even though garden centers could remain open.

Across the street from Forest Pet Supplies is Patricia & # 39; s Florist (Photo: Owner Patricia Taylor), who had to adapt her business model to accept orders only by phone and Click & Collect, even though garden centers could remain open.

Hundreds of thousands of non-essential retailers have been told to keep their doors closed under England's third nationwide lockdown.

The government's decision to keep garden centers open while other retailers are closing has angered some bosses and shopkeepers.

Hotels will also have to close during this lockdown and guests will have to leave the hotel unless they are permanently resident on the premises or cannot return home.

Boris Johnson told the British yesterday evening that they can only leave the house for legitimate reasons – including "to buy essentials".

And the government released guidelines last night explaining which businesses are "essential" after many stores were controversially open during the November Tier 3 lockdown.

The main retail trade includes grocery stores, supermarkets, pharmacies, garden centers, builders and suppliers of building products and off-licenses, the government's official website states.

Less obvious retailers allowed to trade in person include dry cleaners, outdoor botanical gardens, and auctions for cattle or farm implements – while any other type of auction must be closed.

Those who break the rules – including gyms that refuse to close – can be fined £ 200. That number can double up to £ 6,400 for repeat offenders.

Scroll down for the full government guide

Hundreds of thousands of non-essential retailers are forced to keep their doors closed under England's third nationwide lockdown

Hundreds of thousands of non-essential retailers are forced to keep their doors closed under England's third nationwide lockdown

The new rules are slightly different from Tier 4 in that archery and shooting ranges, as well as outdoor equestrian centers, could be opened below the highest tier – but must be closed under the new national lockdown.

All non-essential stores could be opened under Tier 3.

Other companies allowed to stay open in the new lock are repair providers, gas stations, automatic (but not manual) car washes, banks, post offices, short-term loan providers, and funeral directors.

Veterinarians will remain open, as will animal rescue centers, zookeepers – for the good and not for aesthetic reasons – and boarding schools.

Parking spaces, public toilets and motorway service stations are also open.

Cultural heritage sites that are outside remain open to the public – but only if they are used for “movement”.

The British took to Twitter to share their confusion over why businesses like garden centers were seen as essential.

Carole Bookless asked, “Can you explain why a garden center is considered essential during this lockdown?

"Nobody's life depends on a garden center being open."

Emma Powell warned the parents urgently: “My 14-year-old stepdaughter is now going to the garden center because it is the new hanging place. Not satire. & # 39;

Mel added, “You can even go to the garden center. Because this is definitely a must in the dead of winter.

Another angry Twitter user wrote: “So Covid loves a crowd? If that's true, why are garden centers still open, for example?

& # 39; How are they essential retail? The garden center population is Covid's most popular host. The mind confuses.

“Keep supermarkets open and close everything else. It really is that simple. & # 39;

Other companies to close due to the new lockdown are gyms causing anger online. Previously, they could operate in Tier 3 areas.

Tay said, “Gyms, safe exercise areas in dark and cold winters are closed when jumping through all the hoops to open safely.

In the meantime, I can step into Tesco and be attacked by hundreds of anti-maskers who, despite this pandemic, insist on touching any object. Please make it sense.

“We need fitness studios in winter to provide people like me with the much-needed physical and mental health benefits.

“I don't have a place to work out inside and you can't make me run in the dark, after Covid in the cold.

“I cough up a lung when I exercise indoors. I understand we're trying to ease the pressure on the NHS.

“But we also have to think about keeping people fit in winter in order to survive these viruses.

The British took to Twitter to share their confusion over why businesses like garden centers were seen as essential

The British took to Twitter to share their confusion over why businesses like garden centers were seen as essential

Especially since Covid seems to be destroying those who are overweight and unfit.

“Anyone who can afford to train in a gym should be allowed to do so.

"And there needs to be support for those who cannot currently afford gym membership, whether through government-subsidized programs or other such avenues that could also help keep gyms afloat."

Others claim their business won't survive the final lockdown.

Sara Bridgeman said: “I almost lost my business with the first ban. I followed the rules and claimed benefits.

“My husband died in May and since then I've focused on rebuilding my business. I'm not sure I have the will to do it again. & # 39;

According to real estate consultant Altus Group, more than 550,000 companies are going to close in England.

The company said this includes 401,690 non-essential stores, 64,537 pubs or restaurants, 20,703 personal care facilities and 7,051 gyms or leisure centers.

Other companies to close due to the new lockdown are gyms causing anger online. Previously, they could operate in Tier 3 areas

Other companies to close due to the new lockdown are gyms causing anger online. Previously, they could operate in Tier 3 areas

Others claim their business won't survive the final lockdown. Sara Bridgeman said: “I almost lost my business with the first ban. I followed the rules and claimed benefits. “My husband died in May and since then I've focused on rebuilding my business. I'm not sure I have the will to do it again. & # 39;

Others claim their business won't survive the final lockdown. Sara Bridgeman said: “I almost lost my business with the first ban. I followed the rules and claimed benefits. “My husband died in May and since then I've focused on rebuilding my business. I'm not sure I have the will to do it again. & # 39;

Business leaders have reacted with desperation to the new lockdown, fearing that businesses won't last until spring.

UK Chambers of Commerce Director General Adam Marshall said yesterday: “Businesses will understand why the Prime Minister was forced to respond to the growing public health threat, but they will be amazed and disappointed that he has not announced additional support for affected businesses in addition to these new restrictions.

& # 39; The lockdowns announced today in England and Scotland are a major blow to our business community, hot on the heels of lost trade over the Christmas season and uncertainty surrounding the end of the Brexit transition period.

& # 39; Tens of thousands of businesses are already in a precarious position and are now facing a period of further difficulties and difficulties.

“Billions have been spent helping good companies weather this unprecedented crisis and save jobs. These companies can't fail now if the vaccine rollout at the end of this long tunnel sheds light.

Roger Barker, Director of Policy at the Institute of Directors, said, “The recurrence of the virus is making the pain worse for businesses.

Clothing stores are non-essential retailers and must be closed for the next six weeks of lockdown

Clothing stores are non-essential retailers and must be closed for the next six weeks of lockdown

But supermarkets are allowed to stay open for the purchase of essential groceries

But supermarkets are allowed to stay open for the purchase of essential groceries

& # 39; For businesses in sectors such as tourism and hospitality, the vaccine-driven recovery seems a long way off. Even for organizations that can work remotely, the closure of schools and kindergartens can lead to significant personnel problems.

& # 39; The Treasury Department now needs to step up support for the worst hit sectors. In particular, efforts should be made to strengthen the discretionary grant system allocated by local authorities, which has helped reach those who have fallen through the gaps.

"It will also be vital to smooth out the cliffs for support that is rapidly approaching in spring."

What you can and can't do during national lockdown: Government guidelines in full

You have to stay home. The most important action we can all take is to stay home to protect the NHS and save lives.

You should follow these instructions immediately. The law will be updated to reflect these new rules.

Leaving home

You are not allowed to walk or be outside your home unless you have to. You can leave home to:

  • Buy for basic needs, for you or a vulnerable person
  • going to work or doing volunteer or community service when you cannot reasonably do so from home
  • If you are exercising with your household (or your support bladder) or someone else, this should be limited to once a day and you should not travel outside of your area.
  • Hit your support or childcare bubble if necessary, but only if you are legally entitled to create one
  • Seek medical attention or avoid injury, illness, or the risk of harm (including domestic violence).
  • attend an apprenticeship or childcare – for those entitled

Universities, elementary and secondary schools will only remain open to vulnerable children and children of critical workers. All other children study until the half year of February. The settings for the first few years remain open.

The university offering will remain online until mid-February for all but future courses for critical workers.

If you leave home for a valid reason, you should always remain in the village, town, or part of the town where you live. You can leave your region for any reason permitted by law; B. because of work.

If you are at extreme clinical risk, only go out for medical appointments, exercise, or when it is important to go out. You shouldn't take part in the work

Meet others

You can't leave home to socialize with someone who you don't live with or who you're not in a support bubble with (unless you are legally allowed to form one).

You can train on your own, with someone else, or with your household or support bubble.

You shouldn't meet anyone else you don't live with or with whom you've formed a support bubble unless there is a valid reason why you can.

Stay 2 meters away from people who are not in your household.

Detailed instructions on national blocking

Who this guide is for

These instructions are aimed at people who are fit and healthy. There is additional advice for people who are clinically extremely susceptible to coronavirus and for households with possible or confirmed coronavirus infection. If you are at extreme clinical risk, avoid going to work, school, college, or university and limiting the amount of time you spend outside the home. You should only go out for medical appointments, exercise, or when it is important.

Hands. Face. Room.

About 1 in 3 people with coronavirus have no symptoms and could spread it without realizing it.

Remember – 'hands. Face. Space. & # 39;

  • Hands – Wash your hands regularly for at least 20 seconds
  • Face – Wear face covering indoors where social distancing can be difficult and you will come into contact with people you would not normally meet
  • Space – If possible, stay 2 meters away from people you do not live with, or 1 meter if additional precautions are taken (such as wearing face coverings).

At all costs, follow the directions to meet others safely.

If you can leave the house

You are not allowed to leave your home or be outside of it unless you have a "reasonable excuse". This is regulated by law. The police can take action against you if you leave the house without a “reasonable apology” and impose a fine (Fixed Penalty).

You can get a fixed fine of £ 200 for the first offense, which doubles to a maximum of £ 6,400 for further offenses.

A "reasonable apology" includes:

  • Work – You may only leave home for work when it is inappropriate for you to do your work from home, including but not limited to those who work in critical national infrastructure, construction, or manufacturing and require personal presence
  • Volunteering – You can also leave home to do volunteer or community service.
  • Essential Activities – You can leave home to buy things in stores or get services. You can also leave home to do these things on behalf of a disabled or vulnerable person, or someone who is self-isolating.
  • Education and Childcare – You can only leave home for education, registered childcare, and supervised activities for children that you are eligible to attend. Access to education and activities for school-age children is limited. More information about education and childcare can be found here. People can continue existing arrangements for contact between parents and children in whom they are separated. This includes childcare bubbles.
  • Meeting with Others and Care – You can leave home to visit people in your support bubble (if you are legally entitled to form one), to informally care for children under the age of 14 under a child care bubble (e.g. to To enable parents to work and not allow social contact between adults), to look after disabled or vulnerable people, to provide emergency aid, to participate in a self-help group (with up to 15 people) or to take a care break if this care is for a vulnerable person or a person with a disability or is taking a short break in relation to a cared child.
  • Exercise – You can continue exercising alone, with someone else, or with your household or support bladder. This should be limited to once per day and you shouldn't travel outside of your area. You should keep social distance. See train and meet other people.
  • Medical Reasons – You can leave home for medical reasons, including a COVID-19 test for medical appointments and emergencies.
  • Harm and Compassionate Visits – You can leave the house to be with someone who is giving birth, to avoid injury or illness, or to avoid the risk of harm (such as domestic violence). You can also leave the house to visit someone who is dying, someone in a nursing home (if this is permitted under the guidance of the nursing home), a hospice or hospital, or to accompany them to a doctor's appointment.
  • Animal welfare reasons – You can leave your home for animal welfare reasons, e.g. B. To contact a veterinary service for advice or treatment.
  • Communal Worship and Life Events – You can leave home to attend or attend a place of worship for communal worship, funeral or event related to a death, burial site or memorial garden, or to attend a wedding ceremony. You should follow instructions on how to use places of worship safely and should not mix with anyone outside of your household or support bubble when visiting a place of worship. Weddings, funerals, and religious, belief-based, or memorial events associated with the death of an individual are all subject to attendance limits. Weddings and civil ceremonies may only take place in exceptional cases.

There are other reasonable excuses. For example, you may leave your home to comply with legal obligations or to engage in activities related to buying, selling, renting or renting a residential property, or when it is reasonable to vote in an election or referendum.

Train and meet other people

You should minimize the amount of time you spend outside your home.

It is against the law to socialize with family or friends unless they are part of your household or your support bubble. You can only leave your home to play sports and not for recreation or leisure (e.g. a picnic or a social gathering). This should be limited to once per day and you shouldn't travel outside of your area.

You can exercise outdoors in a public place:

  • of yourself
  • with the people you live with
  • with your support bubble (if you are legally entitled to create one)
  • in a child care bubble where child care is offered
  • or, if you are alone, with 1 person from another household
  • Public outdoor spaces are:
  • Parks, beaches, publicly accessible landscape, forests
  • public gardens (regardless of whether you pay to enter or not)
  • the site of a cultural heritage
  • playgrounds

Outdoor sports venues, including tennis courts, golf courses, and swimming pools, must be closed.

When around other people, stay 2 meters away, from people outside your household – that is, from the people you live with – or from your support bubble. If this is not possible, maintain a distance of 1 meter with additional precautions (such as wearing a face covering).

They have to be used in many indoor spaces, e.g. For example, wear face-covering in shops or places of worship that remain open and on public transport, unless you are exempt. That's the law. Read the instructions for face coverings.

Support and child care bubbles

You have to meet certain eligibility requirements to form a support or childcare bubble. This means that not everyone can form a bubble.

A support bubble is a support network that connects two households. You can only build a support bubble with another household of any size if you meet the eligibility requirements.

It is against the law to create a support bubble if you don't follow these rules.

You're allowed to leave home to visit (and stay with) your support bubble. However, if you are creating a support bubble, it is best if it happens with a household that lives locally. This will prevent the virus from spreading to an area where more people are infected.

If you live in a household with anyone under the age of 14, you can create a childcare bubble. This allows friends or family members from another household to offer informal childcare.

You are not allowed to socialize with your child care bubble and are allowed to avoid seeing members of your child care and support bubbles at the same time.

There are separate instructions for support bladders and childcare bladders.

Where and when you can meet in larger groups

There are still circumstances where you can meet other people outside of your household, childcare or support bubble in larger groups. However, this should not be for socializing and should only be for permissible purposes. A full list of these circumstances is included in the regulations and includes:

  • for work or for voluntary or charitable services, if this is not reasonable from home. This can include working in other people's homes, for example, nannies, cleaners, social workers who support children and families, or tradespeople, if necessary. See Instructions for Working Safely in Other People's Homes. If a work meeting doesn't need to be in a home or garden, it shouldn't be. For example, although you can meet a personal trainer, do so in an outdoor public place.
  • in a child care bubble (only for child care purposes)
  • If authorized, use these services for education, registered childcare and supervised activities for children. Access to educational and childcare facilities is restricted. More information about education and childcare can be found here.
  • for agreements in which children do not live in the same household as their parents or legal guardians
  • To enable contact between birth parents and cared for children as well as between cared for siblings
  • for potential adoptive parents to meet a child or children who can be placed with them
  • Enable or facilitate the placement or relief of a child or children in the care of another through social services
  • for birth partners
  • Provide emergency assistance and avoid injury or illness or the risk of injury (including domestic violence)
  • to see someone dying
  • to fulfill a legal obligation, such as B. participation in a court or jury service
  • for meetings in prison or immigration detention centers
  • To provide care or support for vulnerable people or to give a caregiver a break
  • for a wedding or an equivalent ceremony in exceptional cases and only for up to 6 people
  • for funerals – up to 30 people. Wakes and other related ceremonial events can continue in a group of up to 6 people.
  • visiting someone at home who is dying, visiting someone receiving treatment in a hospital, hospice, or nursing home, or taking a family member or friend to a doctor's appointment
  • for elite athletes (and their coaches if required, or parents / guardians if under 18) – or for those on an official elite sports path – to compete and train
  • to facilitate a move

Support groups that need to be delivered in person can continue with up to 15 participants who are formally organized to provide mutual help, therapy or other forms of support. However, they must take place in a room other than a private household.

Generally, if a group includes someone affected by an exception (such as someone who works or volunteers), they are not counted as part of the gathering limit. This means, for example, that a trader can go into a household without exceeding the limit when he is there for work, and the civil servant at a wedding would not count towards the limit.

If you break the rules

The police can take action against you if you meet in larger groups. This includes breaking illegal gatherings and the imposition of fines (fixed criminal charges).

You can get a fixed fine of £ 200 for the first offense, which doubles to a maximum of £ 6,400 for further offenses. If you hold or are involved in an illegal gathering of over 30 people, the police can impose a fine of £ 10,000.

Protection of people at risk from coronaviruses

If you are clinically prone, you may be at greater risk of developing serious illness from the coronavirus. There is additional advice for those who are extremely clinically susceptible to coronavirus. Those who are at extreme clinical risk should not go to work, school, college, or university and limit the amount of time they spend outside the home. You should only go out for medical appointments, exercise, or when it is important.

travel

You are not allowed to leave your home unless you have a reasonable excuse (e.g. for work or educational purposes). If you do need to travel, stay local – that is, do not travel outside of your village, town, or part of a town you live in – and try to limit the total number of trips you make to reduce. The list of reasons why you can leave your home and region includes, among others:

  • work where you cannot reasonably work from home
  • Access to education and caring responsibilities
  • Visit those in your support bubble – or your childcare bubble for childcare
  • Visiting a hospital, family doctor, and other medical appointments or visits where you have had an accident or are worried about your health
  • Buying the goods or services that you need, but should be near you wherever possible
  • Exercise outdoors. If possible, this should be done on site. However, if necessary, you can travel a short distance within your area to do so (e.g. to gain access to an open space).
  • Participation in the care and exercise of an animal or veterinary services

If you need to travel, walk, or bike, plan ahead and avoid busy times and public transit routes. This is a great way to practice social distancing while traveling.

Avoid car sharing with people outside of your household or support bubble. See the instructions for car sharing.

If you have to use public transport, you should follow the safer tour guides.

Trips abroad

You can only travel internationally or within the UK if you have a legal reason to leave for the first time. In addition, you should consider the public health advice in the country you are visiting.

If you need to travel overseas (and it is permitted by law, e.g. because it is a job), you should check the rules that apply, even if you are returning to a place where you have previously visited the destination and travel advice of the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO).

UK residents currently abroad do not need to return home immediately. However, you should check with your airline or tour operator about return shipping arrangements.

Foreigners are subject to the rules for staying at home. You should not travel abroad unless permitted. That means you are not allowed to go on vacation.

When you visit the UK, you can return home. You should check to see if there are any restrictions at your destination.

Stay away from home overnight

You cannot leave your home or where you live for a vacation or to stay overnight unless you have a reasonable excuse to do so. This means that holidays in the UK and abroad are not allowed.

This includes staying in a second home or caravan if that is not your main residence. This includes staying with someone you don't live with unless they're in your support bubble.

You can stay away from home overnight if you:

  • visit your support bubble
  • cannot return to their primary residence
  • need accommodation when moving
  • require accommodation to attend a funeral or similar memorial service
  • need accommodation for work purposes or for volunteering
  • are a child who needs housing for school or care
  • are homeless, seeking asylum, a vulnerable person seeking refuge, or when escaping harm (including domestic violence)
  • are a professional athlete or their support staff or parent if the athlete is under 18 and needs to be outside the home for training or competition

If you are already on vacation, you should return to your home as soon as possible.

Providers of guest accommodation such as hotels, B & Bs and caravan parks can remain open for reasons specified by law, e.g. B. If guests cannot return to their main residence, use this guest accommodation as their main residence and need accommodation while moving. are self-isolating as required by law or would otherwise become homeless due to the closure of the accommodation. For a full list of reasons, see the UK Closing Guidelines for Certain Businesses and Venues.

Accommodation providers are also encouraged to work with local authorities to provide shelter to vulnerable groups, including the homeless.

Go to work

You can only leave home to work if you cannot adequately work from home.

If people cannot work from home – including, but not limited to, people working in critical national infrastructure, in construction, or in manufacturing – they should continue to travel to work. This is important in keeping the country running and supporting sectors and employers.

Public sector workers engaged in essential services such as childcare or education should continue to work.

You can do so wherever you have to work in other people's homes – for example, for nannies, cleaners, or traders. Otherwise, avoid meeting for work in a home or garden where safe COVID-19 measures may not be in place.

Employers and employees should discuss their working arrangements, and employers should take all possible steps to make it easier for their employees to work from home, including providing adequate IT and equipment to enable remote working.

The risk of transmission can be significantly reduced if the security guidelines of COVID-19 are strictly followed. People at higher risk should be given special consideration.

Go to school, college and university

Universities, primary schools (from reception) and secondary schools remain open to vulnerable children and children of critical workers. All other children study until the half year of February.

Under these circumstances, we do not believe that all summer exams will be carried out as planned. We will accordingly work with Ofqual to consult quickly and make alternative arrangements that will enable students to make fair progress.

Public exams and professional assessments due to take place in January are proceeding as planned.

Universities

Those undergraduate students studying for the following courses should return to face-to-face learning as planned and be tested twice upon arrival or self-isolating for ten days:

  • Medicine & Dentistry
  • Topics related to medicine / health
  • Veterinary medicine
  • Training (initial teacher training)
  • Social work
  • Courses that require Technical, Legal and Regulatory (PSRB) Assessment and / or Compulsory Activities scheduled for January that cannot be postponed (your university will notify you if this applies to you).

Students who are not studying these courses should stay where they are wherever possible and start their semester online as their university allows until at least mid-February. This includes students from other practical courses not on the list above.

We have already published guidelines for universities and students on how to safely return to higher education in the spring semester. This guide outlines how we will support higher education providers so that students who need to return after the winter break can do so as safely as possible.

If you live in a university, you shouldn't switch back and forth between your permanent home and your dorm during semester time.

For those students eligible for face-to-face tuition, you can meet in groups larger than your budget as part of your formal education or training if necessary. Students should expect to follow instructions and restrictions. You should socially distance yourself from someone you don't live with wherever possible.

childcare

There are several ways in which parents and carers can still access childcare:

  • Settings for early years (including kindergartens and child minders) remain open
  • Children at risk and children of critical workers can continue to use registered childcare, child minders and other childcare activities (including all-round care).
  • Parents can create a childcare bubble with another household for informal childcare purposes if the child is under 14 years old. This is mainly used to enable parents to work and should not be used to enable social contact between adults
  • Some households will also benefit from a support bubble
  • Nannies can continue to provide services, including at home

Nursing home visits

Visits to nursing homes can be done with provisions such as large screens, visiting capsules, or behind windows. Internal visits with close contact are not permitted. Visits are not permitted in the event of an outbreak.

You should read the guides on Visiting Nursing Homes During COVID-19 to find out how visits should be conducted. The residents cannot meet people when they visit the house (e.g. to visit their relatives in the family home). There are separate guidelines for those who lead supported lives.

Weddings, civil partnerships, church services and funerals

Weddings, civil weddings and funerals are permitted with strict attendance restrictions and may only take place in safe locations from COVID-19 or in public outdoor areas, unless there are exceptional circumstances.

Funerals can be attended by a maximum of 30 people. Linked religious, faith-based or memorial events such as stone settings and ash scattering can also be continued with up to 6 participants. Those who work are not taken into account within these limits. Social distancing between people who do not live together or share a support bubble should be maintained.

Weddings and civil weddings may only take place with up to 6 people. Who works is not included. These should only take place in exceptional cases, e.g. For example, in an urgent marriage in which one of the marriages is seriously ill and not expected to recover or undergo debilitating treatment or life-changing surgery.

Places of worship

You can visit places of worship for worship. However, you are not allowed to talk to anyone outside your household or the support bubble. You should maintain strict social distancing at all times.

You should follow national guidelines for the safe use of places of worship.

Sport and physical activity

Gyms and sports facilities remain closed. Outdoor sports fields, outdoor gyms, golf courses, outdoor pools, archery / driving / shooting ranges, and horse riding areas must also be closed. Organized outdoor sports for disabled people may continue.

Move home

You can still move home. People outside of your household or support bubble should only help with the move if absolutely necessary.

Real estate and rental companies as well as moving companies can continue to operate. If you want to move, you can go to the property views.

Follow national guidelines for moving home safely, including advice on social distancing, breathing in fresh air, and wearing a face covering.

Financial support

Wherever you live, you may be able to get financial help

Companies and venues

Companies and venues that are about to close

To reduce social contact, regulations mandate that some businesses shut down and place restrictions on some businesses' supply of goods and services. The full list of businesses required to close can be found in the UK Closure Guidelines for Certain Businesses and Venues, but includes:

  • Non-essential retail stores such as clothing and homeware stores, vehicle showrooms (other than for rental), betting shops, tailors, tobacco and vape shops, electronic goods and cellphone stores, auction houses (other than for livestock or farm equipment auctions). and market stalls selling non-essential goods. These venues can continue to provide click-and-collect services (where goods are pre-ordered and picked up off site) and delivery services.
  • Eating places such as cafes, restaurants, pubs, bars and clubs; with the exception of the provision of take-away food and non-alcoholic drinks (until 11 p.m.), click-and-collect and drive-through. All food and drinks (including alcohol) can still be provided by delivery.
  • Accommodation such as hotels, hostels, guest houses and campsites, except in certain circumstances, e.g. For example, when this is a person's primary residence, when the person cannot return home to provide shelter or support for the homeless, or when it is important to stay there for work
  • Leisure and sports facilities such as leisure centers and fitness studios, swimming pools, sports fields, fitness and dance studios, riding arenas in riding centers, climbing walls and golf courses.
  • Entertainment venues such as theaters, concert halls, cinemas, museums and galleries, casinos, amusement arcades, bingo halls, bowling alleys, ice rinks, go-karting venues, indoor game and soft play centers and areas (including inflatable parks and trampoline centers), circuses, Exhibition centers, fairs, water parks and theme parks
  • Animal attractions (such as zoos, safari parks, aquariums, and game reserves)
  • Indoor attractions at locations such as botanical gardens, historic homes, and landmarks must also be closed, although the outdoor area of ​​these premises may remain open for outdoor exercise.
  • Personal care facilities such as hair, beauty, tanning and nail salons. Tattoo studios, spas, massage parlors, body and skin piercing services must also be closed. These services should not be performed in other people's homes
  • Community centers and halls must be closed, with the exception of a limited number of exempted activities as noted below. Libraries can also remain open to provide access to IT and digital services – for people who don't have them at home, for example – and to click-and-collect services

Some of these shops and locations are also allowed to be open for a small number of optional activities. For a full list of exemptions, see the UK Closure Guidelines for Certain Businesses and Venues including:

  • Education and training – so schools can use sports, recreational and community facilities if this is part of their normal care
  • Childcare purposes and supervised activities for the eligible children
  • Hosting blood donation meetings and food banks
  • to provide medical treatment
  • for top athletes for training and competitions (in indoor and outdoor sports facilities) and for professional dancers and choreographers for work (in fitness and dance studios)
  • for training and rehearsals without an audience (in theaters and concert halls)
  • for the purpose of film and television recordings

Companies and venues that can stay open

Other companies and venues are allowed to stay open as per COVID-19 security guidelines. Companies that offer important goods and services can remain open. The full list of these companies can be found in the UK Company and Venue Closure Guidelines but includes:

  • major retail stores such as grocery stores, supermarkets, pharmacies, garden centers, builders and suppliers of building products and off-licenses
  • Market stalls selling major retail stores may also remain open
  • Companies that provide repair services can also remain open where they primarily provide repair services
  • Petrol stations, automatic (but not manual) car washes, vehicle repair and MOT services, bike shops and taxi and vehicle rentals
  • Banks, building societies, post offices, short-term loan providers and money transfer companies
  • Undertaker
  • Laundromats and dry cleaners
  • medical and dental services
  • Veterinarians and retailers of products and food for the maintenance and welfare of animals
  • Animal rescue centers, boarding schools, and zookeepers (can still be used for animal welfare purposes and not for aesthetic purposes).
  • Agricultural products shops
  • Shops to support mobility and disability
  • Storage and distribution facilities
  • Parking lots, public toilets and motorway service stations
  • Outdoor playgrounds
  • Outdoor areas of botanical gardens and heritage sites to exercise
  • Places of worship
  • Crematoriums and burial sites

Public service

Most of the public services continue and you can go out to visit them. These include:

  • the NHS and medical services such as family doctors and dentists. We support the NHS in delivering urgent and non-urgent services safely, and it is important that anyone who believes they need any medical attention should come forward and seek help
  • Jobcentre Plus websites
  • Courts and probation
  • Registry offices
  • Passport and Visa services
  • Services to the victims
  • Waste or recycling centers
  • getting a MOT if you have to drive when you leave home legally

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