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Angela Merkel warns that the Covid cases in Germany will increase TENFOLD if they don't stop the BRITISH virus.


Angela Merkel has warned that Germany will see ten times as many Covid cases by Easter if they fail to stop this British virus.

The Chancellor told lawmakers in her Conservative Party that she anticipates the final lockdown will last until April to stop the spread of a more infectious mutant strain that first appeared in the UK and has since spread to mainland Europe.

President Donald Trump has been labeled "racist" for his use of the terms China virus and even kung flu to describe the coronavirus, which is believed to originate from Wuhan.

It comes as coffins are stacked in offices and corridors in the Saxon city of Meissen, where a crematorium manager says they cremate 60 bodies a day.

The state of Saxony, in which Meißen is located, comprises six of the ten most affected districts in Germany.

Angela Merkel has warned that Germany will see ten times as many Covid cases by Easter if they fail to stop this British virus.

However, Merkel did not hold back when she spoke about her latest measures in a meeting on Wednesday.

She said: & # 39;If we fail to stop this British virus, we will have ten times as many cases by Easter. We still need eight to ten weeks of tough measures, "Bild quoted Merkel.

Three participants at the meeting told Reuters that Merkel had not explicitly spoken of extending the lockdown until April and had not warned of a tenfold increase in the number of infections in Germany.

"Merkel said the next eight to ten weeks would be very difficult if the British variant were to spread to Germany," said one of the respondents. The Chancellor pointed out a ten-fold increase in the number of infections in Ireland due to the new variant.

A Tory MP replied to her comments to MailOnline: “This is not helpful. The reason she can call it that is because we can track the variations so well – far better than in other countries.

“That doesn't mean that it necessarily started here, we can just see them better.

“It is an awkward way for the German Chancellor to describe it. Calling this variant the "British virus" is extremely unhelpful.

"I think she would want to change her wording afterwards."

President Donald Trump was asked about his use of the terms China virus and even kung flu to describe the pandemic

President Donald Trump was asked about his use of the terms China virus and even kung flu to describe the pandemic

Meanwhile, Conservative MP Andrew Bridgen said, “We identified the variant because we have the best genome sequencing labs in the world.

& # 39; The EU has just signed a trade deal with the Chinese and doesn't want to upset them.

"This is pathetic as the Covid virus almost certainly came from the Wuhan laboratory and China is not allowing an independent investigation into the pandemic outbreak."

Mr Bridgen added: "I wonder if they will mention the UK vaccine when they give the Oxford vaccine to EU citizens."

Germany was initially lauded for having one of the best virus responses in the world, but cases and deaths have risen since the lockdowns were relaxed.

The rising numbers forced Merkel to announce tightening measures before Christmas, and today she warned that the measures may need to be tightened.

Germany had tightened a national lockdown last week and extended it to the end of January amid fears that the more transmissible variant of the virus, first discovered in Great Britain, could put an additional burden on the hospitals fighting.

On Tuesday, the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) for Infectious Diseases reported 12,802 new coronavirus cases.

According to the RKI, the death toll after Covid-19 rose by 891, making a total of 41,577 deaths.

Europe's largest economy aims to limit the spread of the virus until enough populations have been vaccinated to achieve herd immunity.

So far, only 688,782 people in Germany have received the vaccine, less than one percent of the population.

The Prime Minister of the southern Bavarian state, Markus Soeder, called for a discussion on the introduction of mandatory vaccinations for nursing home staff, as many home workers did not intend to come up against COVID-19.

Coffins in corridors of the crematorium in Meissen, Germany, after an increase in Covid deaths

Coffins in corridors of the crematorium in Meissen, Germany, after an increase in Covid deaths

The crematorium usually had 70 to 100 caskets on site at this time of year, but now 300 bodies are waiting to be cremated and more each day to be brought to the crematorium

The crematorium usually had 70 to 100 caskets on site at this time of year, but now 300 bodies are waiting to be cremated and more each day brought to the crematorium

In the memorial hall in Meißen, boxes with the inscription "Covid" are stacked

In the memorial hall in Meißen, boxes with the inscription "Covid" are stacked

The number of deaths from coronavirus in eastern Germany has increased. Three boxes were stacked in the memorial hall of the Meissen crematorium.

Many of the coffins that are stacked in empty offices and stored in hallways are sealed with plastic wrap, while others are labeled "Risk of Infection", "Urgent" or simply "COVID".

Crematorium director Jörg Schaldach said: “The situation is a bit tense for us at the moment.

Jörg Schaldach, head of the Meissen crematorium

Jörg Schaldach, head of the Meissen crematorium

“It is normal for more people to die in winter than in summer. It has always been like this. & # 39;

At this time of year, when the flu season is affecting the elderly, the crematorium typically has 70 to 100 caskets on site.

There are now 300 corpses waiting to be cremated, and dozens more each day are brought to the modernist building on a hill overlooking Meissen, an ancient city better known for its delicate chinaware and impressive Gothic castle.

On Monday, the district of Meißen again took over the undesirable lead in the German COVID-19 tables with an infection rate three times the national average.

The state of Saxony, in which Meißen is located, comprises six of the ten most affected districts in Germany.

According to Schaldach, the crematorium is doing its best to keep up with demand by lighting the twin ovens every 45 minutes and managing 60 cremations per day.

"The ashes still end up in the right urn," he said.

Some have linked Saxony's high infection rate with a more general sentiment against the government in a country where more than a quarter voted for the far-right party Alternative for Germany in the last national elections.

Jörg Schaldach, director of the crematorium, says he is trying to keep up with the demand to light the double ovens every 45 minutes and to carry out 60 cremations a day

Jörg Schaldach, director of the crematorium, says he is doing his best to keep up with the demand to light the double ovens every 45 minutes and manage 60 cremations a day

Legislators have objected to the need to wear masks, restrict people gathering and shop closings. Some have even directly denied the existence of a pandemic.

Other commentators have noted the large number of elderly people in the state and its reliance on nursing home workers from the neighboring Czech Republic, where COVID-19 infections are even higher.

Officials in Meissen, including the head of the district administration, the local doctors' association and the legislature who represents the region in parliament, an ally of Chancellor Angela Merkel, declined to be questioned about the situation.

(tagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) Nachrichten (t) Angela Merkel (t) China (t) Donald Trump (t) Coronavirus Lockdowns