ENTERTAINMENT

ANDREW PIERCE: Is Robert Jenrick a darling of the developers … or a buddy of the poorest?


During a commons debate earlier this year, Robert Jenrick worked out an important planning policy that helps disadvantaged communities.

The housing secretary argued that it was correct that developers who make large sums of money from large housing projects should pay the so-called Community Infrastructure Levy (CIL) to the municipalities, which can then spend the money on schools, health centers, streets, etc.

Jenrick explained that the tax was used for "crucial" purposes and added: "Due to the recent changes, there will soon be more transparency so that residents can see where this money is going."

Transparency? The troubled minister clings to his work after being accused of having been given planning permission for a £ 1bn housing project for developer Richard Desmond – who happens to be a Tory donor – to pay a $ 45m Could avoid pound CIL bill.

This money would have gone to Tower Hamlets in East London, one of Britain's most deprived areas.

Housing secretary Robert Jenrick argued that it was correct that developers who earn large sums from large housing projects should pay the so-called Community Infrastructure Levy (CIL) to the municipalities

The troubled minister clings to his work after being accused of having been given planning permission for a £ 1bn housing project for developer Richard Desmond - who happens to be a Tory donor - to pay a $ 45m Could avoid pound CIL bill

The troubled minister clings to his work after being accused of having been given planning permission for a £ 1bn housing project for developer Richard Desmond – who happens to be a Tory donor – to pay a $ 45m Could avoid pound CIL bill

Overheard in the House of Commons: Two MPs talk about canceling daily press conferences on Downing Street. "You should replace them with the Pointless TV show on the schedule," murmurs one. "It would be a seamless transition."

Dismissal is a pose for Rayner

Oh, being a fly on the wall in Rebecca Long-Bailey's house and Labor's deputy director Angela Rayner (the two women share an apartment in London when they're not in their constituencies with their families).

Hard lefter Long-Bailey was released from the shadow cabinet by party leader Sir Keir Starmer last week after retweeting an article on an anti-Semitic conspiracy theory. How awkward it must have been for her and her roommate to drink toast and jam the next morning.

Speakers at an online union event organized by the TUC in July included both Rayner and Corbynista actress Maxine Peake, whose inaccurate article Wrong-Daily was retweeted, leading to their defenestration.

Will Rayner now refuse to share a platform with ex-Communist Peake? Sir Keir will watch.

Our TV is really blue, says Gyles

Gyles Brandreth watched more TV than usual while participating in the Channel 4 series Celebrity Gogglebox.

The former Tory MP says that it is almost impossible these days to find a TV show that doesn't contain swear words – and worse. He points out that in 1967, after watching an episode of Till Death Us Do Part that contained 44 uses of the word "bloody," Mary Whitehouse exclaimed, "This is the end of civilization as we know it!"

"For better or worse, it turns out that she was right," Brandreth told The Oldie magazine.

Despair at the government's neglect of the theater industry during the pandemic prompted casting director Sarah-Jane Price to suggest, "We should all be singing musicals in front of Parliament until they listen to us." Parliament Repeatedly Repeatedly Square will certainly encourage MPs to act.

Leading Lib Dem Sir Ed Davey is asking parliamentary written questions at a rate of 50 a week to stand out in six weeks before his party's leadership competition. Officials estimate that answering every question costs £ 140, so that's £ 7,000 a week. If Sir Ed goes on like this, it could cost taxpayers more than £ 80,000 – a lot of public money to influence a competition that most voters don't think twice about.

Worker-controlled North London Camden was one of the first councils to cry about Covid-19 financial difficulties and warn of a £ 43m hole in its finances that would grow if the crisis continued.

This is the Council, which at a closed meeting last year increased its chairman's annual allowances by 66 percent to £ 9,000 and cabinet members' allowances by 54 percent to £ 25,000.

Council chairwoman Georgia Gould, daughter of the late New Labor founder Lord Gould, should know exactly where she can save.

Worker-controlled North London Camden was one of the first councils to cry about Covid-19's financial difficulties and warn of a £ 43m hole in its finances that would grow if the crisis continued

Worker-controlled North London Camden was one of the first councils to cry about Covid-19's financial difficulties and warn of a £ 43m hole in its finances that would grow if the crisis continued

(tagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) Debate (t) Robert Jenrick