ENTERTAINMENT

Amy Coney Barrett asked questions about her SCOTUS nomination on the first full day, praising Justice Scalia


Facing the first full day of questions about her SCOTUS nomination, Amy Coney Barrett again praises Justice Scalia but warns, "You will get Justice Coney Barrett, not Justice Scalia."

  • Supreme Court Candidate Amy Coney Barrett welcomed her classification as "female Scalia" on Tuesday's first day of questioning
  • “But I want to be careful to say that if I am confirmed you would not get Justice Scalia. You would have Justice Barrett, ”she distinguished
  • All 22 senators on the Senate Judiciary Committee have 30 minutes on Tuesday to interview President Donald Trump's candidate

Amy Coney Barrett welcomed her classification as a "female Scalia" on Tuesday as the questioning of the Supreme Court candidate began for confirmation on the second day of her hearing – but made sure she was different from the last judiciary.

"Justice [Antonin] Scalia was obviously a mentor," began Barrett of the Supreme Court Justice she worked for, adding on her earlier assertion that "his philosophy is mine too."

"He was a very eloquent advocate of originalism, and so was textualism," she said.

“But I want to be careful to say that if I am confirmed you would not get Justice Scalia. You would have Justice Barrett, ”she distinguished. "And that's because originalists don't always agree, and neither does textualists."

Barrett arrived with her family in tow on the second day of her confirmation hearing Tuesday morning as she prepares to answer questions from all 22 members of the Senate Judiciary Committee – each given 30 minutes.

Supreme Court Candidate Amy Coney Barrett welcomed her classification as a "female Scalia"

“But I want to be careful to say that if I am confirmed you would not get Justice Scalia. You would have Justice Barrett, ”she distinguished

“But I want to be careful to say that if I am confirmed you would not get Justice Scalia. You would have Justice Barrett, ”she distinguished

For the hearing, six of her seven children, her husband Jesse, and her six siblings sat behind her

Six of her seven children, her husband Jesse and her six siblings sat behind her for the hearing

Chairman Lindsey Graham started the day off and asked Barrett to explain her "originalist" views in plain English.

"I interpret the constitution as law," she said. “I understand it has the meaning it had at the time people ratified it. This meaning doesn't change over time and it's not up to me to update it or bring my own policy view into it. & # 39;

Graham, a Republican Senator from South Carolina, started the day by telling Barrett she could relax and remove her white face covering, then started a monologue claiming he wanted to differentiate between politics and the judiciary.

He railed against the Affordable Care Act, which Democrats spent most of their time during Monday's opening speech, claiming it would be jeopardized if Barrett was upheld.

The oral arguments with the ACA begin in November – after the election, but two months before the inauguration.

Six of Barrett's seven children and her husband sat in a row over her right shoulder, and White House attorney Pat Cipollone sat behind her on her left.

Barrett's youngest child with Down syndrome stayed at home for the hearings – but she assured me that he was watching her on TV.

In the row behind their children and husband were all six of Barrett's siblings.

On Monday, all members of the committee gave their opening speech along with Barrett.

As on the first day of the hearing on Monday, protesters immediately gathered outside on Capitol Hill to protest Barrett's nomination

As on the first day of Monday's hearing, protesters immediately gathered outside on Capitol Hill to protest Barrett's nomination

Democrats opposed Barrett's nomination, claiming it was a political move President Donald Trump took a few weeks before the 2020 election to crush affordable care law at the Supreme Court level.

They also claim that their religion could prevent them from being a "fair" justice, saying that their devout Catholic beliefs would lead to the dismantling of abortion rights, with a conservative 6-3 Supreme Court Roe v. Wade would likely fall.

Republicans, on the other hand, said Democrats play politics and turn a judge's office into a campaign issue. The GOP also accuses the opposition party of creating a religious test for Barrett that is against the constitution.

advertising