ENTERTAINMENT

Amol Rajan tells Lord Hall of fears that the BBC will become the "broadcasting wing of the BLM movement".


Amol Rajan, media editor for the BBC, asked General Director Lord Hall about fears among colleagues that the company is becoming the "broadcast wing of the Black Lives Matter movement."

The outgoing general manager Tony Hall appeared on the media show yesterday to discuss the crises and successes of his time as the outlet manager. Topics such as diversity, TV licenses and controversies over the use of the n-word were covered.

Regarding race and equality, Mr Rajan told Lord Hall there were concerns about the broadcast giant's stance on certain issues.

He said, “I have been contacted by several Radio 4 listeners and some senior colleagues from BBC News to express deep concern that they believe the BBC has indeed become the broadcasting wing of the Black Lives Matter movement.

& # 39; A seasoned highly regarded correspondent here wrote to me: & # 39; & # 39; Amol, challenging racial prejudice is a noble thing, but should it be the BBC's business? Shouldn't we just report? & # 39; & # 39;

"What do you say?"

Amol Rajan said: "Several listeners to Radio 4 and some senior colleagues from BBC News have contacted me to express deep concern that they believe the BBC has indeed become the broadcasting wing of the Black Lives Matter movement. "

The outgoing general manager Tony Hall appeared on the media show yesterday to discuss the crises and successes of his time as the outlet manager. Topics such as diversity, TV licenses and controversies over the use of the n-word were covered

The Finnish conductor makes a statement stating that she did NOT rule Britannia and that she was "an important part of the event" – adding pressure on the BBC Proms director for making a "creative" decision

According to reports from the BBC, 35-year-old Dalia Stasevska had called for the patriotic anthem to be removed from the performance along with Land of Hope and Glory because of her ties to British imperialism

According to reports from the BBC, 35-year-old Dalia Stasevska had called for the patriotic anthem to be removed from the performance along with Land of Hope and Glory because of her ties to British imperialism

A Finnish conductor who was involved in a row on the last night of the Proms has issued a statement insisting that she is not responsible for removing Rule Britannia and recognizes this as "an important part of the event" on.

BBC sources quoted in the Sunday Times claimed that Dalia Stasevska, 35, was one of those who wanted to "modernize" the event and reduce the patriotic elements associated with it.

Ms. Stasevska, who has expressed support for Black Lives Matter, has been controversial after reports that she had concerns about the words to Rule Britannia and Land of Hope and Glory.

But Ms. Stasevska has now pointed out in a statement made on her behalf by the management company HarrisonParrott that she had no part in the BBC's decision not to have the patriotic hymns sung.

This adds to the pressure on BBC Proms Director David Pickard after Director General Lord Hall endorsed his creative decision and confirmed that he and his team have considered Rule Britannia's links to colonialism.

Ms. Stasevska said in the statement: “It is a great honor for me to be part of this year's BBC Proms and their legendary Last Night.

& # 39; I understand its importance in the British classical music calendar and in the wider cultural landscape. It's incredibly exciting to be part of an event with such a long tradition.

& # 39; It is a testament to the tireless work and dedication of the organizers that the Proms can go on at all this year.

Lord Hall, who took office as Director General in April 2013, responded by saying "diversity is important" and "getting it right in our broadcasting affairs too".

He continued: & # 39;I think making sure that we employ people from different backgrounds, black, Asian and ethnic minorities, both in front of and behind the camera, is fantastically important.

“And this is how I go back, this is how you get this variety of thinking in your program areas, in your news, in the dramas and other things that you do.

“That's why it's important and I have to say that we're making great strides here.

"It is important to have a fund that uses existing money to commission £ 100 million worth of content for programs of all backgrounds – and equally important is a 20 percent target for people behind the camera and behind the microphone with ethnic black and Asian minorities. "

Mr Rajan then asked if Lord Hall believed that there was a risk that the BBC "left a lot of people trying to focus on young people".

Lord Hall said: & # 39; The BBC needs to appeal to a wide range of opinions and types of people across the country.

“One of the interesting things about the BBC is that you are dealing with all kinds of rifts in British society and you have to address all of these people.

“Whoever you are, whatever background you come from, rich, poor, whatever part of the country you currently live in, having things to share, and common goods that bring you together, what you do Having everyone access is phenomenally important. & # 39;

Later in the interview, he said he hoped people could feel, that they could feel Safe to say what they think in the workplace.

He also acknowledged the anger caused by a white reporter's use of the n-word in the air.

The BBC was upset in public this week after it was revealed that they would be removing vocals from Rule Britannia and Land of Hope and Glory from the last night of the Proms this year – despite continuing to be instrumental.

And Mr. Rajan asked Lord Hall if the songs were ever be dropped from the last night of the proms.

He replied, “Look, I think my take on the Proms is a miracle that (Director) David Pickard and the team did something that I think was really important, which was to have two weeks of music at the end of the Proms- Live Music Season – & # 39;

Mr Rajan asked again, mentioning a number of newspaper front pages and "an enormous amount of noise on social media" on the matter. He asked if there was any discussion of dropping these songs because of their connection to Britain's imperial past.

Lord Hall replied, "You have come to the correct conclusion, which is actually …"

Mr. Rajan interrupted: "So there was a discussion?"

"Well, the whole thing was of course discussed by David and his colleagues," said Lord Hall.

He added, “The point is, you have come to the correct conclusion that in an Albert Hall that employs over 5,000 people, it's very, very difficult to have that last night's proms vibe and things where the entire audience is usually singing along, it's pretty hard to be creative and artistic to do this work.

"I think they came to the right conclusion which is to instrumentalize it and who knows what will happen next year, I suspect it will be back."

Mr. Rajan asked if Lord Hall would in principle be happy if the lyrics were sung, despite any association with Britain's imperial past.

Lord Hall said, “Look, the fact is we came to the right conclusion, which is a creative ending, which is an artistic ending, which you know is there and in a mixture of playing around the sea shanties And all of that, I guess it'll be back next year. & # 39;

Mr Rajan also asked Lord Hall if Land of Hope and Fame and Reign of Britannia would ever be removed from the last night of the Proms (pictured 2013).

Mr Rajan also asked Lord Hall if Land of Hope and Fame and Reign of Britannia would ever be removed from the last night of the Proms (pictured 2013).

Critics say Rule Britannia and Land of Hope and Glory are racist because of their alleged links to slavery and colonialism.

Traditionally, both songs are performed in the Royal Albert Hall in London in front of a flag-waving crowd on the Last Night of the Proms.

Earlier this week, Songs of Praise producer Cat Lewis blew up Rule Britannia's lyrics, stating that the nation shouldn't get excited about their story as the BBC Proms franchise tightened.

Ms. Lewis tweeted: "Believe the British, who believe it is okay to sing an 18th century song about never being enslaved, which was written when Britain enslaved and killed millions of innocents, too, that it is appropriate for neo-Nazis to scream "we'll never be forced into a gas chamber" scream.

She later added to her comments, saying she would start a national competition to find new lyrics for the songs if she produced The Proms.

She tweeted, “I believe slavery was Britain's Holocaust.

“We should apologize properly and we don't have a memorial to enslaved people in Britain at the moment. We shouldn't celebrate slaveholders.

“And we shouldn't be singing so happily that the British will never be enslaved if we were responsible for enslaving so many.

“We should have hymns that celebrate what is really great about Britain that we can all sing, and this will help unite our country.

"If I were to produce the Proms, I would suggest starting a national competition to find new lyrics for Rule Britannia and Land Of Hope And Glory – words that celebrate and unite our fantastic country because the music is undoubtedly fabulous for both of them is. "

Bafta-winning producer Lewis began her career in 1988 as a BBC production trainee before working as a reporter and moving to television in Granada.

The television industry veteran later started her own Manchester-based company which she believes has sales of £ 3 million.

The ongoing controversy over Ms. Lewis' comments comes amid revelations that BBC bosses discuss new programs on diversity in "every conversation" and the issue is "non-negotiable" according to the outlet's comedy director.

Shane Allen (pictured), who is in charge of scripting all comedy programs for BBC channels, says content director Charlotte Moore has consistently advised staff not to forget about diversity

Shane Allen (pictured), who is in charge of scripting all comedy programs for BBC channels, says content director Charlotte Moore has consistently advised staff not to forget about diversity

It comes amid a new series of races as Jamaica's Secretary of State Kamina Johnson-Smith criticized a clip from the BBC Three Show Famalam (pictured)

It comes amid a new series of races as Jamaica's Secretary of State Kamina Johnson-Smith criticized a clip from the BBC Three Show Famalam (pictured)

The company has announced that it will spend £ 100 million of its content budget on various programs over a three-year period this summer following protests from Black Lives Matter activists.

BBC Newsnight editor Katie Razzall apologizes for being a white woman presiding over "Racism in the Newsroom"

BBC Newsnight editor Katie Razzall shared her embarrassment over being appointed a white woman to chair a "Racism in TV Newsroom" session at a media festival.

The 49-year-old told the Edinburgh online television festival this week: "My chairmanship as a white woman on this panel shows the challenge we all face."

There is a shortage of ethnic minority presenters and reporters on the BBC's current programming, which has led to it being nicknamed "Newswhite".

The BBC was also criticized this week for its decision to play Rule Britannia and Land of Hope and Glory on this year's Last Night of the Proms without lyrics.

There will be an orchestrated version with no lyrics after the organizers allegedly wanted to reduce patriotic elements to reflect the anti-racism movement of the Black Lives Matter.

Razall hosted a discussion titled "Coverage of Racism: Television Journalism and Black Lives Matter" with four panelists, three of whom are black and one white.

Shane Allen, who is responsible for commissioning all of the scripted comedy programming for BBC channels, says content director Charlotte Moore kept telling staff not to forget to consider diversity, reports The Guardian.

He said, “I've been part of regimes where you have to be seen to do something. It's non-negotiable with Charlotte, it's one thing that underpins any conversation: what's the diverse element about it? And can't it be set in London? & # 39;

Hiring June Sarpong and Miranda Wayland to advise the company means there are now "really strong voices in the room" talking about diversity, Allen told the Edinburgh television festival.

He also defended the sketch show Famalam, which the Jamaican Foreign Minister classified as "outrageous and insulting".

"Diss, my beloved famalam," he said. “Being relevant in comedy, at a time when things can feel anodyner, and in this lively culture where things get a little more sensitive.

“If you want to do something about tricky issues, it has to be from these people and from those communities that have that voice. To me, a sketch show in 2020 looks like this. I will support them until it stops. & # 39;

Jamaica's Secretary of State Kamina Johnson-Smith criticized a clip from the BBC Three show showing a Jamaican version of the Channel 4 show Countdown, complete with a steel drum version of the show's theme.

Ms. Johnson-Smith tweeted, “This is outrageous and insulting to the incredible country that I am proud to represent along with every Jamaican at home and in our #Diaspora. I will officially write about it right away! #StopThisShow. & # 39;

The BBC defended Famalm, with channel controller Fiona Campbell saying it wasn't "malicious," adding, "We stand by the Creator's kind of humor."

She told the Edinburgh TV Festival: & # 39; Famalam is now in its third series and it's very successful.

“It's not malicious humor, and I think if you stick to social issues, the creators themselves say they make fun of all stereotypes.

"There is no malice in the nature of the content."

A BBC spokesperson said, "Famalam … now in its third series has an established type of humor that meets audience expectations and is known for tackling problems."

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