ENTERTAINMENT

Amazon is delaying the return of employees to its London headquarters by two months


Retail giant Amazon has told employees that they should continue working from home until 2021. This is creating a wave of employers delaying returns to the office due to the rise in coronavirus cases.

The company previously announced plans to allow workers around the world to stay home if they could do their jobs “effectively” by early January.

After the government announced plans to include London in the second-tier lockdown restrictions to contain virus cases, the expected return date for UK employees was postponed to March.

Amazon's huge UK headquarters on London's Principal Place, which can accommodate up to 5,000 employees, has been largely empty since the first lockdown in March this year.

Retail giant Amazon has told employees that they should continue working from home until 2021, while its UK headquarters on London's Principal Place has been largely empty since March this year

Londoners from Saturday It is forbidden to mingle with other households indoors, including bars and other venues.

Offices and public transport can remain open, but general government advice on working from home wherever possible remains in place.

Essex, Elmbridge, Barrow in Furness, York, Northeast Derbyshire, Chesterfield and Erewash are also classified as Tier 2

With 18,980 new cases reported yesterday, it seems firmly concerned about setting definitive dates for a return to the office.

More than half of the auditing firm KPMG's 17,000 employees who normally worked in a client office or company workplace had joined other employees who were already working from home.

The company is believed to have reopened its offices with safe measures from Covid-19, but only employees who need to "come in" do so.

Tim Jones, Chief Operating Officer at KPMG: “As a company we have always been ready to work remotely on a large scale, and although the COVID-19 crisis has accelerated it, we see a hybrid model as the future for our and our business customers.

& # 39; During this crisis, we have strictly followed the latest scientific and government recommendations and will continue to do so.

The government has announced plans to include London in the second stage lockdown to contain virus cases (pictured, abandoned Oxford Street).

The government has announced plans to include London in the second stage lockdown to contain virus cases (pictured, abandoned Oxford Street).

"We anticipate a large number of colleagues will continue to work from home for the rest of the year, but our offices will remain open to those with business or health problems."

KPMG has also developed its own app that employees can use to conduct a risk assessment before they return.

Banking firm Standard Chartered's headquarters in London are believed to remain largely empty, with fewer than one in six employees returning to date.

According to a source, the company recently told workers not to come to their Moorgate headquarters unless "you can't work from home," which means the occupancy could be "only 10 percent".

It's not clear if the new state restrictions would change the company's position, but the added standard would be as directed.

Figures show that the UK unemployment rate rose in August, a clear sign that the unemployment rate is headed to levels not seen in 30 years.

The Bureau of National Statistics said Tuesday that unemployment rose by 138,000 in the three months to August compared to the previous three-month period.

The unemployment rate rose from 4.1 percent in the previous quarter to 4.5 percent, the highest level since the beginning of 2017.

As of Saturday, Londoners will no longer be allowed to mix with other households indoors, including bars and other venues (above, Catford Mews shopping center on September 23).

As of Saturday, Londoners will no longer be allowed to mix with other households indoors, including bars and other venues (above, Catford Mews shopping center on September 23).

The UK economy suffered one of its deepest recessions in the spring and, while recovering in recent months, is still around 10 percent smaller than at the end of 2019.

The main reason unemployment has not soared was the government's Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, which used to pay most of the salaries of workers who were not laid off.

Around 1.2 million employers have used the program to take 9.6 million people off leave, costing the government nearly £ 40 billion (US $ 52 billion).

At one point, around 30 percent of the UK workforce was on vacation. Although they have not worked in the past few months, they have not been counted as unemployed.

As the program ends at the end of October, many of those still on leave are expected to be laid off and unemployment to rise further.

How more than 210,000 job losses have been recorded by major UK companies since the lockdown began

Since the coronavirus lockdown began in March, major UK employers have cut 210,781 jobs as follows:

  • October 7 – Greene King – 800
  • October 6 – Virgin Money – 400
  • October 6 – Vp – 150
  • October 5th – Cineworld – 5,500 (many cuts probably temporary)
  • September 30th – TSB – 900
  • September 30th – Shell – 9,000 worldwide
  • September 29 – Ferguson – 1,200
  • September 22nd – Wetherspoon – 400 to 450
  • September 22 – Whitbread – 6,000
  • September 18 – Investec – 210
  • September 15 – Waitrose – 124
  • September 14 – London City Airport – 239
  • September 9 – Lloyds Bank – 865
  • September 9 – Pizza Hut – 450
  • September 4 – Virgin Atlantic – 1,150
  • September 3 – Costa – 1.650
  • August 27 – Pret a Manger – 2,800 (including 1,000 announced on July 6)
  • Aug 26 – Gatwick Airport – 600
  • August 25 – Cooperative Bank – 350
  • August 20 – Alexander Dennis – 650
  • August 18 – Bombardier – 95
  • Aug 18 – Marks & Spencer – 7,000
  • August 14th – Yo! Sushi – 250
  • August 14 – River Island – 350
  • August 12 – NatWest – 550
  • August 11th – InterContinental Hotels – 650 worldwide
  • August 11 – Debenhams – 2,500
  • August 7 – evening standard – 115
  • August 6 – Travelex – 1,300
  • August 6 – Wetherspoons – 110 to 130
  • August 5 – M & Co – 380
  • 5 August – Arsenal FC – 55
  • August 5 – WH Smith – 1,500
  • August 4th – Dixons Carphone – 800
  • August 4 – Pizza Express – 1,100 at risk
  • August 3 – Hays Travel – up to 878
  • August 3 – DW Sports – 1,700 at risk
  • July 31 – Byron – 651
  • July 30th – Pendragon – 1,800
  • July 29 – Waterstones – unknown number of functions at headquarters
  • July 28 – Selfridges – 450
  • July 27 – Oak Furnitureland – 163 Endangered
  • July 23 – Dyson – 600 in the UK, 300 overseas
  • July 22 – Mears – less than 200
  • July 20 – Marks & Spencer – 950 Endangered
  • July 17 – Azzurri Group (owns Zizzi and Ask Italian) – up to 1,200
  • July 16 – Genting – 1,642 endangered
  • July 16 – Burberry – 150 in the UK, 350 overseas
  • July 15 – Banks Mining – 250 Endangered
  • July 15 – Buzz Bingo – 573 Endangered
  • July 14th – Vertu – 345 July 14th – DFS – up to 200 endangered
  • July 9 – General Electric – 369
  • July 9 – Eurostar – unknown number
  • July 9 – Boots – 4,000
  • July 9 – John Lewis – 1,300 Endangered
  • July 9 – Burger King – 1,600 endangered
  • July 7 – Reach (owns Daily Mirror and Daily Express newspapers) – 550
  • July 6 – Pret a Manger – 1,000 endangered
  • July 2 – Casual Dining Group (owns Bella Italia and Cafe Rouge) – 1,909
  • July 1 – SSP (owns Upper Crust) – 5,000 at risk
  • July 1 – Arcadia (owns TopShop) – 500
  • July 1 – Harrods – 700
  • July 1 – Virgin Money – 300
  • June 30 – Airbus – 1.700
  • June 30 – TM Lewin – 600
  • June 30th – Smiths Group – "some job losses"
  • June 25 – Royal Mail – 2,000
  • June 24th – Jet2 – 102
  • June 24th – Swissport – 4,556
  • June 24 – Crest Nicholson – 130
  • June 23 – Schuhzone – unknown number of workstations in the headquarters
  • June 19 – Aer Lingus – 500
  • June 17 – HSBC – UK jobs unknown, 35,000 worldwide
  • June 15 – Jaguar Land Rover – 1,100
  • June 15 – Travis Perkins – 2,500
  • June 12th – Le Pain Quotidien – 200
  • June 11 – Heathrow – at least 500
  • June 11 – Bombardier – 600
  • June 11 – Johnson Matthey – 2,500
  • June 11 – Centrica – 5,000
  • June 10 – Quiz – 93
  • June 10 – The restaurant group (owns Frankie and Benny & # 39; s) – 3,000
  • June 10 – Monsoon Accessorise – 545
  • June 10 – Everest Windows – 188
  • June 8 – BP – 10,000 worldwide
  • June 8 – Mulberry – 375
  • June 5th – Victoria's Secret – 800 in danger
  • June 5 – Bentley – 1,000
  • June 4th – Aston Martin – 500
  • June 4 – Lookers – 1,500
  • May 29 – Belfast International Airport – May 45
  • May 28 – Debenhams (in the second announcement) – Hundreds of jobs
  • May 28 – EasyJet – 4,500 worldwide
  • May 26 – McLaren – 1,200
  • May 22 – Carluccio – 1,000
  • May 21 – Clarks – 900
  • May 20 – Rolls-Royce – 9,000
  • May 20 – Bovis Homes – unknown number
  • May 19 – Ovo Energy – 2,600
  • May 19 – antlers – 164
  • May 15 – JCB – 950 Endangered
  • May 13 – Tui – 8,000 worldwide
  • May 12 – Carnival UK (owns P&O Cruises and Cunard) – 450
  • May 11th – P&O Ferries – 1,100 worldwide
  • May 5 – Virgin Atlantic – 3,150
  • May 1st – Ryanair – 3,000 worldwide
  • April 30 – Oasis Warehouse – 1,800
  • April 29 – WPP – unknown number
  • April 28 – British Airways – 12,000
  • April 23 – Saffron Seats – 400
  • April 23 – Meggitt – 1,800 worldwide
  • April 21 – Cath Kidston – 900
  • April 17 – Debenhams – 422
  • March 31 – Laura Ashley – 268
  • Mar 30 – BrightHouse – 2,400 Endangered
  • March 27 – Chiquito – 1,500 endangered

(tagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) Nachrichten (t) London (t) Coronavirus