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Airlines are taking legal action against the government's "faulty" quarantine policy


British Airways, easyJet and Ryanair are taking legal action against the government's "faulty" quarantine policy, which they say will have "devastating effects" on tourism and the economy

  • The airline group wants a judicial review to be heard "as soon as possible".
  • They claimed that the quarantine would destroy the British tourism industry
  • They said they had seen no evidence of when the proposed airlifts will come

British Airways, easyJet and Ryanair have taken legal action against the government's "faulty" 14-day quarantine policy.

The airlines announced that they had requested a judicial review "as soon as possible" and claimed that the measures implemented this week would have "devastating effects on British tourism and the economy as a whole".

They said they saw no evidence of when the proposed airlifts between Britain and other countries would be implemented.

British Airways, easyJet and Ryanair have taken legal action against the government's "faulty" 14-day quarantine policy (Gareth Fuller / PA).

Instead, they want the government to resume the policy introduced on March 10 that passengers from countries at high risk of coronavirus infection will have to isolate themselves upon arrival in the UK.

The three airlines said in a joint statement: "This would be the most practical and effective solution and would allow officials to focus on other, more important issues posed by the pandemic while the UK is reconciling with much of Europe that will open its pandemic borders in mid-June. & # 39;

Airline claims to legal challenge of quarantine include:

  • The guidelines are stricter than those applicable to people who have been confirmed to have Covid-19.
  • There was no consultation on scientific evidence intended for "such a strict policy".
  • Foreigners who commute to the UK weekly are exempt.

Most international arrivals in the UK have had to go through a 14-day quarantine since Monday.

All passengers, with a few exceptions, must complete an online search form that includes their contact and travel dates, and the address at which they will isolate themselves.

Anyone who fails to comply with the rules may be fined GBP 1,000 in England. The police are allowed to use "reasonable force" to ensure that they comply with the rules.

Border guards carry out checks upon arrival and can refuse entry to a non-resident foreigner who refuses to comply with the regulations.

Failure to fill out the Locator form will result in a permanent criminal complaint of £ 100.

In addition to complaints from the travel industry, the program has been heavily criticized by opposition parties and some conservative MPs.

Interior Minister Priti Patel has insisted that politics "can help stop a devastating second wave of the corona virus".

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