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According to reports, 16- to 24-year-olds will struggle to find work when the vacation program ends this month


The employment crisis caused by the coronavirus will hit up to a million young people in a matter of weeks, creating a "Covid generation" that new research suggests will struggle to find work.

Leading labor market expert Paul Gregg, professor of economic and social policy at Bath University, claimed that nearly a million 16- to 24-year-olds who are neither in full-time education nor employment will have difficulty finding work if the vacation program is implemented ends this month.

The study, which will be released Monday, says young people will have dire prospects if more support is not offered.

It comes amid mounting tensions between the government and Greater Manchester Mayor Andy Burnham over Westminster's attempts to impose Tier 3 restrictions on northern regions.

Mr Burnham will be calling on Parliament to step in to break the impasse by putting in place a system to support young people.

On Sunday, former Prime Minister Gordon Brown also warned the debate by warning that there is a "hidden army of young people in dire need of our help".

The employment crisis caused by the coronavirus will hit up to a million young people in a matter of weeks, creating a "Covid generation" who will struggle to find work, according to new research. Pictured: Chancellor Rishi Sunak

Leading labor market expert Paul Gregg, professor of economic and social policy at Bath University, claimed that nearly a million 16- to 24-year-olds who are neither in full-time education nor in employment will have difficulty finding work if the vacation program takes place ends this month. Pictured: a young person walks past a closed store in Manchester

Leading labor market expert Paul Gregg, professor of economic and social policy at Bath University, claimed that nearly a million 16- to 24-year-olds who are neither in full-time education nor employment will have difficulty finding work if the vacation program is implemented ends this month. Pictured: a young person walks past a closed store in Manchester

He founded the Alliance for Full Employment and said the country could not afford "another lost generation like the 1980s".

The vacation program introduced by Chancellor Rishi Sunak paid employees 80 percent of their wages while unable to work during the coronavirus lockdown and was designed to ensure their employers did not fire them.

Mr Gregg's study, reported by The Guardian, claims that the end of the vacation benefit system, the shortage of new job opportunities and the arrival of high school and college graduates in the labor market will offer dire prospects for young people unless more support is around the corner.

It also warns that Boris Johnson's "guarantee of opportunities" for young people who have completed an apprenticeship or internship, which he announced in June, "falls far short of what is needed".

In The Observer, Mr Brown wrote that it was "hard to believe" that a million young people will be in dire need of assistance in two weeks when the vacation program ends.

On Sunday, former Prime Minister Gordon Brown also warned the debate by warning that there is a "hidden army of young people in dire need of our help".

On Sunday, former Prime Minister Gordon Brown also warned the debate by warning that there is "a hidden army of young people who are in dire need of our help".

On the Sunday broadcast on BBC Radio 4 he said, “This is an ethical question, it is a moral question.

& # 39; One million young people unemployed. It goes back to the 1980s. I was shocked to find out that this was the character of young people who have nothing to do.

“There is a hidden army of young people in dire need of our help, and we cannot afford to have another lost generation like we did in the 1980s. A lost generation of Covid.

“It destroys self-worth, it harms family life. It shatters communities. It means that people find that relationships with other people are incredibly difficult.

"It's ethical because it's about our responsibility to other people."

He added: “If we allow 1 million young people, or numbers approaching that number, to be unemployed for months, just think about the cost of unemployment benefits.

A growing feud between Andy Burnham (pictured) and top ministers is set to intensify after Labor Mayor Rishi Sunak subsequently called "the problem" over stricter coronavirus restrictions in Greater Manchester

A growing feud between Andy Burnham (pictured) and top ministers is set to intensify after Labor Mayor Rishi Sunak subsequently referred to "the problem" over tighter coronavirus restrictions in Greater Manchester

“Think about the costs that arise when our community structure breaks down. We just cannot afford not to act.

"And of course, educating a young person is not that expensive compared to some of the vacation payments we had to make."

In September the government launched a £ 2 billion KickStart program to get young people into work. According to figures, 538,000 under 25s have applied for a record of universal loan blocking.

However, Mr Brown told the BBC that the plan launched by Chancellor Rishi Sunak "does not fit".

He said, “It's not about the problem. According to his suggestions, it is not possible to get people back to work or to keep them the way he wanted to.

“I looked at vacancies – one vacancy, one vacancy, but 2,900 people who choose Northumbria.

One in Newcastle, 2,600, in the Midlands, 1,600 people looking for a job.

“These are the terrible numbers that show how difficult it will be, especially for young people.

“Outside of school, outside of college, sometimes with no degree, sometimes with no confidence in their own position, who need help.

Under the KickStart program, employers can offer interns that benefit applicants, with the state covering 100 percent of the resulting minimum wage, social security and pension payments.

On Sunday, Greater Manchester Mayor Mr Burnham referred to Mr Sunak as "the problem" as the dispute over major coronavirus restrictions escalated.

The Mayor of Greater Manchester, who has called for more financial support for the area before planning to put it into a Tier 3 lockdown, has attacked the Chancellor, who he believes has "consistently been wrong."

In an interview with New Statesman magazine, he also attacked Sunak's "Eat Out to Help Out" program as "poor judgment."

Mr Burnham and Conservative politicians in Greater Manchester are opposed to the government's Tier 3 measures that will close pubs and bars in the area.

The two sides are currently at a stalemate on the proposals.

Mr Burnham has called for a return to the generosity of the original vacation program, where the Treasury Department paid 80 percent of workers' wages.

However, Mr Sunak has only offered a 66 percent grant to those whose businesses have been forced to close due to Tier 3 measures.

Prior to the alleged weekend talks that Mr Burnham's office denies, the Mayor of Greater Manchester suggested to Mr Sunak, in an interview with New Statesman magazine, “I think the problem now is in large part with the Chancellor. I think he made wrong judgments along the way. & # 39;

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