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According to Cate Blanchett, gender issues of the 1970s are still relevant when it comes to inequality and feminism


According to Cate Blanchett, gender issues of the 1970s are still relevant and it is important to remember that despite positive changes in the film industry, feminism is not just a "fashion moment"

Gender-specific arguments of the 1970s are still being beaten up today, Cate Blanchett claimed.

The 51-year-old Oscar winner, who plays a political activist and anti-feminist in the US in a BBC mini-series, said current issues such as "same-sex marriage" and "same-sex bathroom" were discussed 50 years ago.

Blanchett, who has long championed gender equality in the acting world, also said that women are consistently outnumbered by men there.

Gender-specific arguments of the 1970s are still being beaten up today, 51-year-old Cate Blanchett claimed

She said, “I always knew in my DNA that women were equal to men. I couldn't quite understand why the industry and the work environment I was spewed into didn't reflect this, so for a long time I didn't feel in sync.

“At some point I started counting the ratio of men to women every sentence I walked on.

“Throughout my career until about four years ago, I was the only woman with 35 men. I was the only woman of 27 men. I was the only woman of 16 men. I just thought it was normal. & # 39;

Despite the positive changes to address balance, Cate insisted that the drive for equality was "not just a fashionable moment in time".

Same topic: The Oscar-winning actress, who stars in a BBC series as an American political activist and anti-feminist, said that 50 years ago people talked about "same-sex marriage" and "same-sex bathroom"

Same topic: The Oscar-winning actress, who stars in a BBC series as an American political activist and anti-feminist, said that 50 years ago people talked about "same-sex marriage" and "same-sex bathroom"

The actress plays Phyllis Schlafly in the BBC 2 drama series Mrs America, which begins on July 8.

It tells the story of the movement to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment in the 1970s and the backlash led by conservative Schlafly.

She feared that it would force women to work instead of staying at home to look after children.

Blanchett told Radio Times: “This show is like Groundhog Day. The discussions we had in 1971 and 1972 are constantly appearing in the media today. Same-sex bathroom. Same-sex marriage.

Must read: The full interview with Cate can be found in this week's Radio Times

Must read: The full interview with Cate can be found in this week's Radio Times

Are women drafted into the military? That came with events in Iran earlier this year. It couldn't be more relevant. & # 39;

The mother of four said: “I was inspired by the way women would speak in the 1970s.

"There was a strong culture of robust public debate … something we lost. We have matches, but we have no sense of public discourse. & # 39;

The multi-award-winning actress, born and raised in Melbourne, lives in a $ 6.25 million mansion called Highwell House near Crowborough, about an hour south of London.

Cate is married to playwright and director Andrew Upton, with whom she shares four children, Dashiell 18, Roman 16, Ignatius 12, and Edith five.

The family previously lived in Hunters Hill, Sydney before moving to the UK.

The full interview with Cate can be found in this week's Radio Times.

Family life: She is married to playwright and director Andrew Upton (picture), with whom she shares four children, Dashiell, Roman, Ignatius and Edith. Pictured in London in October 2019

Family life: She is married to playwright and director Andrew Upton (picture), with whom she shares four children, Dashiell, Roman, Ignatius and Edith. Pictured in London in October 2019

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