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According to British scientists, there is no clear evidence that closing schools will reduce the spread of the coronavirus


No leading evidence that closing schools will reduce the spread of the coronavirus, UK leaders say

  • The prime minister made an U-turn just 24 hours after insisting schools were safe
  • The government is expected to review the closings before mid-term in mid-February
  • The review of the studies was carried out by respected doctors and academics

There is no convincing evidence that closing schools will reduce the spread of the coronavirus, a group of leading UK scientists has found.

Although Cabinet insisted the evidence from the government's academic advisors was "clear" and schools closed last week because "we had to act," a review of studies from around the world found no consensus on the matter – at best, with the evidence, & # 39; unsure & # 39 ;.

It raises questions about what evidence, if any, advisers used to force the prime minister to make an abrupt U-turn just 24 hours after insisting schools were safe.

It raises questions about what evidence, if any, advisers used to force the prime minister to make an abrupt U-turn just 24 hours after insisting schools were safe

The review, which was the first to analyze all of the work that has been done in this area, was conducted by distinguished doctors and academics, including Professor Chris Bonell, who sits on the Sage Advisory Group to the government, and the President of the Royal College of Pediatrics and Child Health, Professor Russell Viner.

Both have previously warned that the government’s pandemic policies, including school closings, put children at risk of becoming a "lost generation".

The team found 3,318 articles published by mid-October last year and focused on ten of the most robust. The papers examined whether sending students home had an impact on transmission of the virus during the first wave. Three, including two of the most reliable, found that keeping students at home "had no effect" on containing the virus, while seven reported "protective effects," including one that indicated school closings reduced infections and deaths resulted in 62 percent.

Both have previously warned that the government’s pandemic policies, including school closings, put children at risk of becoming a "lost generation". Pictured: a student taking a Covid-19 test in Coulsdon, Surrey

Both have previously warned that the government’s pandemic policies, including school closings, put children at risk of becoming a "lost generation". Pictured: a student taking a Covid-19 test in Coulsdon, Surrey

However, the authors said a "major challenge" was assessing whether the decision to send students home had this effect or whether it was the result of other measures.

Their report, which has not been peer-reviewed, concludes: “Our results agree that school closings are ineffective to very effective. With such varied evidence … policymakers should take an appropriate approach before carrying out school closings. "

The government will review the closings in mid-February before mid-term vacation.

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