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A Roman soldier's armor was unearthed at the site where three legions were wiped out in AD 9


The massacre of the spirit of the Teutoburg Forest appears after 2000 years: the armor of a Roman legionnaire, who was "sacrificed" and "cooked in a pot" by Germanic tribesmen, is at a site of the battle that took place in 9 AD 20,000 soldiers from three legions were wiped out

  • Archaeologists working in Kalkriese have found a Roman cuirass
  • It is believed to be the oldest and most complete find of its kind ever made
  • The armor belonged to a soldier who was involved in the battle of the Teutoburg Forest

Archaeologists working in Germany have discovered a nearly complete set of Roman armor.

Experts working in Kalkriese discovered an entire cuirass belonging to a Roman soldier who belonged to one of three legions that were wiped out by Germanic tribesmen in 9 AD.

A cuirass is armor that protects the front and back of the torso, which consists of a chest and a back plate.

Archaeologists working in Kalkriese have discovered a nearly complete set of Roman armor (pictured)

The archaeological discovery is believed to be the oldest and most complete of its kind ever made

The archaeological discovery is believed to be the oldest and most complete of its kind ever made

The armor dates from the year 9 AD and is said to have belonged to a Roman soldier who was involved in the battle of the Teutoburg Forest

The armor dates from the year 9 AD and is said to have belonged to a Roman soldier who was involved in the battle of the Teutoburg Forest

Complete set: The complete Roman cuirass that archaeologists discovered in Germany

Complete set: The complete Roman cuirass that archaeologists discovered in Germany

A cuirass is armor that protects the front and back of the torso, which consists of a chest and a back plate

A cuirass is armor that protects the front and back of the torso, which consists of a chest and a back plate

The Times reports that the director of the museum in Kalkriese, Stefan Burmeister, believes the armor belongs to a Roman soldier who was sacrificed by German warriors after the Battle of the Teutoburg Forest.

He told the newspaper that the new find – the oldest and most complete Roman armament find ever – was both unique and tragic.

A shrew was found near the soldier's shoulders, used to secure a person's wrists in an iron board around his neck.

Given the value of Roman armor, experts wondered why the Germanic warriors didn't loot trophies, but Burmeister explained that the execution of the soldier may have been a sacred ritual.

The armor, which is considered to be the oldest and most complete of all time, was discovered by archaeologists in Kalkriese, where the Battle of the Teutoburg Forest probably took place in 9 AD

The armor, which is considered to be the oldest and most complete of all time, was discovered by archaeologists in Kalkriese, where the Battle of the Teutoburg Forest probably took place in 9 AD

An expert from the museum in the museum in Kalkriese is carefully working on a discovery

An expert from the museum in the museum in Kalkriese is carefully working on a discovery

A Roman shrew violin (pictured) used to lock a person's hands near their neck was also discovered in the armor

A Roman shrew violin (pictured) used to lock a person's hands near their neck was also discovered in the armor

The Battle of the Teutoburg Forest: A painting from 1909 shows the bloody conflict that led to a devastating defeat for the Romans

The Battle of the Teutoburg Forest: A painting from 1909 shows the bloody conflict that led to a devastating defeat for the Romans

He said, “Maybe we have a ritual context to the situation here. In this case, the body and equipment would have been taboo. & # 39;

Almost 15,000 Roman soldiers were slaughtered by Germanic soldiers in the Battle of the Teutoburg Forest and are considered to be one of the two great military defeats in the history of the empire.

As they were traveling through the dense forest towards a winter fortress, they were subjected to minor attacks by Arminius, a warlord of the Cherusci tribe.

The Romans were under the command of Publius Quinctilius Varus, a general under Emperor Augustus, when they were defeated.

Experts studying the discovery believe the craftsmanship is better than previously thought and that it shows how Roman design has changed over the centuries.

The battle of the Teutoburg Forest

The battle of the Teutoburg Forest is one of the two great military humiliations in the glittering history of the Roman Empire.

15,000 Roman soldiers and their commanders, led by Publius Quinctilius Varus, a general under Emperor Augustus, were destroyed by Germanic warriors in a series of guerrilla attacks.

The soldiers were making their way through the Teutoburg Forest to a winter fortress when they were attacked by warriors led by Arminius, a warlord of the Cherusci tribe who later became known as Herman.

Three Roman legions were completely destroyed and the few soldiers who survived the attacks were enslaved by the Germanic warriors.

The Roman soldiers, stretching too thinly, tried several times to break away from the Germanic soldiers, but each time they fell into traps set by Arminius.

After the defeat of the Romans, the Germanic warriors tried to drive the Roman presence out of areas east of the Rhine.

The battle sparked a seven-year war that set the boundaries of the empire for the next 400 years.

15,000 Roman soldiers under the command of Publius Quinctilius Varus were attacked in a series of guerrilla attacks by Arminius, a warlord from the Cheruscan tribe who later became known as Herman (picture).

15,000 Roman soldiers, commanded by Publius Quinctilius Varus, were attacked in a series of guerrilla attacks by Arminius, a warlord of the Cherusci tribe who later became known as Herman (pictured).

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