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A record 1.85 million patients in England now wait more than 18 weeks for treatment in hospital


More than 1.85 million people waited more than 18 weeks for routine hospital treatment in England in June – the highest number since records began in 2007.

Data from NHS England shows that the number of people waiting more than 52 weeks for hospital treatment in England has also increased to 50,536. It's the largest one-year waiting list since February 2009. In contrast, last June, only 1,089 had waited 12 months for treatment.

Figures released today also show that the number of patients admitted for routine treatment in hospitals in England fell 67 percent in June from a year earlier.

A total of 94,354 patients were admitted to treatment during the month, up from 289,203 in June 2019.

Doctors said the NHS was facing "worrying times" after the pandemic and "performance remains poor in hospitals across the country".

During the height of the crisis, thousands of non-urgent surgeries were canceled to prevent Covid-19 from overwhelming an already difficult health service.

More than 1.85 million people had waited more than 18 weeks for hospital treatment in England in June – the highest number since records began in 2007

Dr. Nick Scriven, of the Society for Acute Medicine, who represents hospital doctors, said, "These are worrying times for the NHS given the threat of a second wave of Covid-19 on top of any other pre-existing issues such as bed capacity, staff, funding and provision of social benefits.

& # 39; Performance remains poor and worrying. With a challenging winter ahead, it will take more than one injection of cash announced by the Prime Minister this week to make up for years of neglect.

& # 39; The A&E visitor numbers are still much lower than last year, but despite the lower numbers, the four-hour target was not achieved. This shows how tough the processes were in this new era.

& # 39; With four million people waiting to start treatment and 52 percent waiting up to 18 weeks – well below the 92 percent standard – there is significant concern that this combination will lead to that many more people in urgent conditions later deteriorated in need of more urgent treatment.

Data from NHS England shows the number of people waiting more than 52 weeks to start hospital treatment in England rose from 1,089 in June last year to 50,536, the highest number in calendar months since February 2009

Data from NHS England shows the number of people waiting more than 52 weeks to start hospital treatment in England rose from 1,089 in June last year to 50,536, the highest number in calendar months since February 2009

A&E VISITS EVEN LOWER THAN PRE-KOVIDEN LEVELS IN ENGLAND

According to official data released today, A&E departments are still much quieter than usual after the coronavirus outbreak.

NHS England figures show that there were 1.59 million people in emergency rooms nationwide in July – a slight increase from 1.41 million in June.

But attendance rose from around 2 million before the pandemic to just 916,000 in March during the height of the crisis, and people were too scared to go to the hospital for fear of catching Covid-19.

Despite the small number, the NHS is still failing to meet its performance goal of discharging 95 percent of patients within four hours of admission. Only 92.1 percent of patients were treated within the July timeframe.

The NHS as a whole has not met the 95 percent target in almost five years – most recently in July 2015.

Health chiefs have already said the four-hour goal itself could be dropped.

& # 39; We're particularly concerned about the ongoing crisis in access to diagnostic tests, with the total number of patients waiting six weeks or more after the referral for one of the 15 key tests at 540,600 – 47.8 percent of the total number of waiting patients – what is given the goal is one percent is scandalous. & # 39;

Labor shadow health minister Justin Madders said: “All signals point to a growing and alarming backlog of clinical needs, with patients waiting longer for surgery and diagnostic tests.

“The waiting times prior to the pandemic have been dire and we are making some worrying new lows.

"Of particular concern is the low number of people starting cancer treatment after attending national screening programs, which suggests that people also lack access to screening or rapid treatment."

“This is incredibly worrying when we know that early diagnosis and treatment is critical to saving lives.

"We cannot ignore the fact that there are undoubtedly patients who are not getting help and who may need it urgently." We supported the lockdown to suppress this terrible virus, but the far-reaching consequences for overall health outcomes cannot be ignored. & # 39;

In March, all routine surgeries were postponed to make room for Covid-19 patients who are expected to flood hospitals.

Hospitals in England have been instructed to postpone all elective non-urgent surgeries by April 15 at the latest for at least three months.

Joint replacement, cataract removal, and hernia repairs were among the elective surgeries that were postponed to free beds.

Health bosses fear the backlog, which could reach 10 million by this winter, will take years to resolve. There are currently 3.8 million people in England waiting for non-urgent treatment.

And those faced with delays in their surgery might find their condition worsen while waiting, which could lead to a whole host of other problems.

Cancer waiting times in England have risen to another record high, according to statistics released by NHS England today.

Only 93.7 percent of patients in June were treated within a month of being told they needed medication, surgery, or radiation therapy.

It was slightly below the value of 93.9 percent in May, the lowest level since the monthly performance figures began in 2009.

Separate data showed that only 12.9 percent of patients diagnosed with cancer after a screening appointment was treated within the target time of two months.

Screening is mainly done in women and is checked for breast, colon, and cervical cancers. The goal is to treat 90 percent of patients within two months of being diagnosed.

In comparison: last June the rate was 85.8 percent. It's down from 47.9 percent in May.

NHS England figures also show that a total of 153,134 urgent cancer referrals were made by GPs in England in June 2020, up from 194,047 in June 2019 – a decrease of 21 percent.

This is the number of people referred by a general practitioner to a cancer counselor for an initial appointment.

Macmillan Cancer Support called for the backlog to be fixed to prevent cancer from becoming the forgotten "C" in the coronavirus pandemic.

Sara Bainbridge, the charity's director of politics and influence, said the delays could "directly affect the chances of survival for many of these people."

A&E attendance at hospitals in England fell 30 percent last month from the previous year, figures from NHS England show.

In July 2020, a total of almost 1.6 million visitors were registered, after around 2.3 million in July 2019.

NHS England, which released the numbers, said "significantly lower" visitor numbers compared to last year "are likely due to the response from Covid-19".

It has been suggested that staff are still staying away from the A&E departments because of the coronavirus outbreak.

Visitor numbers rose during the height of the crisis, falling from around 2 million before the pandemic to just 916,000 in March. People were too scared to go to hospital for fear of catching Covid-19.

The waiting times for cancer are still high

Cancer waiting times in England have risen to another record high, according to statistics released by NHS England today.

Only 93.7 percent of patients in June were treated within a month of being told they needed medication, surgery, or radiation therapy.

It was slightly below the value of 93.9 percent in May, the lowest level since the monthly performance figures began in 2009.

Separate data showed that only 12.9 percent of patients diagnosed with cancer after a screening appointment was treated within the target time of two months.

Screening is mainly done in women and is checked for breast, colon, and cervical cancers. The goal is to treat 90 percent of patients within two months of being diagnosed.

In comparison: last June the rate was 85.8 percent. It's down from 47.9 percent in May.

NHS England figures also show that a total of 153,134 urgent cancer referrals were made by GPs in England in June 2020, up from 194,047 in June 2019 – a decrease of 21 percent.

This is the number of people referred by a general practitioner to a cancer counselor for an initial appointment.

Macmillan Cancer Support called for the backlog to be fixed to prevent cancer from becoming the forgotten "C" in the coronavirus pandemic.

Sara Bainbridge, director of politics and influence for the charity, said the delays could "directly affect the chances of survival for many of these people."