ENTERTAINMENT

A quarter of the food bought in panic ends up in the BIN: Hoarders warned that the stockpiling was a "wrong economy".


One in four items bought by hamsters is lost as shoppers are warned that stockpiling is a "false economy," a study found.

The study, conducted by Topcashback, found that the British spent nearly £ 10 billion annually on stockpiling items that were lost, forgotten or thrown away, causing unnecessary food waste and greenhouse gas emissions.

With one in four bulk purchases wasted, the report shows shoppers continue to subscribe to what is called the "false economy" on the cashback shopping website.

The study shows that 80 percent of shoppers identified "saving money" as the main reason for bulk shopping.

Conversely, almost a quarter also said they regretted having replenished themselves at some point – with almost half of those surveyed saying they were financially worse off.

It is because panic buying has resumed across the UK amid fears of a second wave of coronavirus and another lockdown, with shoppers reporting they have queued for 20 minutes to enter stores before it hits the checkouts there will be further delays.

And online customers found it next to impossible to get delivery slots from Asda, Morrisons, Ocado, Sainsbury & # 39; s and Tesco – some had no free slots for up to two weeks.

An empty room that is usually used for toilet paper at Tesco in Slough, Berkshire

Pictures from a Tesco in west London show shoppers emptied the shelves this weekend, although a study shows that one in four items bought in bulk is wasted as an inventory warning

Pictures from a Tesco in west London show shoppers emptied the shelves this weekend, although a study shows that one in four items bought in bulk is wasted as an inventory warning

However, the stores have insisted that the empty shelves be replenished quickly. Pictured: A sign is displayed in a supermarket in Manchester with a limit of three items per customer

However, the stores have insisted that the empty shelves be replenished quickly. Pictured: A sign is displayed in a supermarket in Manchester with a limit of three items per customer

The toilet roll is running out on Thursday afternoon at Tesco in Ely, Cambridgeshire as the store rations it to one pack per customer after customers panic again about buying items

The toilet roll is running out on Thursday afternoon at Tesco in Ely, Cambridgeshire as the store rations it to one pack per customer after customers panic again about buying items

An empty room that usually held cans of beans at Tesco in Slough, Berkshire

An empty room that usually held tins of beans at Tesco in Slough, Berkshire

Restrictions have been put in place on items like flour and eggs, which were the fastest to go away during the country's initial lockdown.

However, stores have insisted that bare shelves, once filled with toilet paper and pasta, be replenished quickly.

The research found that a quarter of purchases are wasted, mainly because the product is not used before the expiration date.

The study estimates that the average shopper spends £ 200 a year on bulk purchases that they don't use and ends up being thrown away – the equivalent of around £ 9.6 billion a year nationwide.

The most popular items bought in bulk were canned food, toilet paper, pasta, rice, frozen food, and soap.

Adam Bullock of Topcashback.co.uk said, “Buyers believe that they are helping the environment by buying in bulk.

“However, by continuously throwing away a percentage of their purchases, they are having a negative impact and damaging their wallet at the same time.

"To be familiar with savings, you don't necessarily have to stock up on large amounts."

** Affected by panic buying? Contact us at katie.feehan@mailonline.co.uk**

Supermarket bosses have been forced to put restrictions on essentials as shoppers keep trying to stock up on fear of a second lockdown.

Waitrose executive director James Bailey told the Sunday Times that "there is enough food to go around".

He added, “But when a person fills their house with all the pasta packages they can get their hands on, it inevitably means that someone else is going to go without them. They could be the most vulnerable or important workers. & # 39;

It comes after Tesco became the newest supermarket to ration groceries and housewares.

To avoid the bulk shopping that left store shelves across the UK almost empty in March, the supermarket giant will limit items like flour, dried pasta, toilet paper and antibacterial wipes to three per customer.

Morrisons announced Thursday that rationing of certain items would be introduced in its stores across the country.

Elderly charities are also encouraging customers to consider the impact panic buying has on the weaker in society.

Caroline Abrahams, Age UK Charity Director, said: “Earlier this year we heard repeatedly from elderly people and families who were deeply concerned about the difficulties of obtaining food and staples.

& # 39; Shopping assistance remains in high demand in the local Age UKs for those struggling to navigate socially distant stores, not online or understandably afraid of going out.

No doubt many older people will fear that history could repeat itself.

"We'd like to urge everyone to look out for others when they come into stores, especially those who really struggle when their local supermarket doesn't get what they need."

Supermarkets have been reported to have increased security and doubled the number of delivery places amid fears that Covid-19 panic buying could return. Pictured: Tesco in South East London

Supermarkets have been reported to have increased security and doubled the number of delivery places amid fears that Covid-19 panic buying could return. Pictured: Tesco in South East London

Waitrose's CEO has beaten up panic buyers, stating that their actions "inevitably mean that someone else will forego". Pictured: Empty shelves at a Sainsbury's in Wandsworth

Waitrose's CEO has beaten up panic buyers, stating that their actions "inevitably mean that someone else will forego". Pictured: Empty shelves at a Sainsbury's in Wandsworth

And restrictions were put in place on items like flour and eggs, which were the fastest to go away during the country's initial lockdown. Pictured: Asda in Barnes Hill, Birmingham

And restrictions were put in place on items like flour and eggs, which were the fastest to go away during the country's initial lockdown. Pictured: Asda in Barnes Hill, Birmingham

The constraints come from supermarket bosses trying to avoid excessive repetition of the inventory panic seen in stores at the start of the pandemic in March.

Pictures of supermarkets across the UK have already shown empty or quickly emptied toilet roll shelves just days after the government announced stricter restrictions to fend off a second wave of coronavirus.

A Tesco spokesperson said, “We have good availability and inventory, and we want to encourage our customers to shop as usual.

& # 39; To ensure that everyone can continue to buy what they need, we've introduced bulk buy limits on a small number of products.

"To enable our customers to shop safely, we will also have colleagues at the entrances to our larger stores to remind customers of the safety measures we have taken, including the legal requirement to wear face-covering."

Asda said they had not seen panic buying in their stores and therefore there were no shopping restrictions.

However, one shopper has asked that people not be "selfish" by storing household items after shelves in an Asda store in County Durham went completely empty.

Keith Jackson said the shelves of toilet paper in Asda, Stanley were completely emptied Saturday.

When the Covid-19 lockdown was first introduced earlier this year, UK shelves were exposed with hard-to-find pasta and toilet paper.

And it seems that in the face of tighter restrictions in the northeast, people are reporting a second wave of panic buying.

After seeing the bare shelves in his local supermarket, Keith asked people not to store supplies, saying this deprives the vulnerable of everyday products, adding to their stress.

Keith said, “It was just the toilet roll for now, though I wouldn't be surprised if the pasta and hand wash are stored next if we have a repeat six months ago.

“I can't stand to store supplies, I think it's selfish and unnecessary. There is enough product in the warehouse to go around.

“Stocking places undue strain on supply chains and deprives those at risk of everyday products, adding to their stress and anxiety.

A sign is displayed in a Manchester supermarket with a limit of three items per customer

A sign in a supermarket in Manchester shows a three item limit per customer

“It feels a lot like the end of March when I had to go to gas stations to buy toilet paper.

“Unfortunately, some people haven't learned anything in the past six months. Your only concern is for yourself, which is a shame.

“It starts with a minority of people, and then others panic and join in for fear of not being able to get the products they need.

"Then it will take a month or two for the supermarkets to get their stocks back to normal."

** Affected by panic buying? Contact us at katie.feehan@mailonline.co.uk ** **.