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A quarter of the crew of a £ 3 billion nuclear submarine has been labeled positive for coronavirus


A £ 3 billion nuclear submarine called "HMS Sex and Cocaine" has seen a coronavirus outbreak among its crew who are resisting the lockdown.

More than 35 crew members on the top secret HMS Vigilant – one of the four submarines that make up the UK's nuclear deterrent – tested positive after several left the US Navy base in Kings Bay, Georgia.

Among those who tested positive – a quarter of the ship's team – included a doctor and a senior executive.

The codes for the use of the nuclear weapons stored on the ship are known only to this officer and one other person.

Seafarers defied orders to go to strip clubs, bars and restaurants in Georgia – 318,000 coronavirus cases and 7,282 deaths.

They traveled 200 miles away to a Florida beach on one trip, an insider said.

In other coronavirus news today:

  • London Mayor Sadiq Khan warned it was "inevitable" that London would fall into a second stage lockdown this week.
  • A poll found that the British don't believe Prime Minister Boris Johnson "Three-step" lock goes far enough;
  • Tory curfew rebels symbolically protested against the closure of the pub at 10 p.m., but could not prevent it.
  • Health Secretary Helen Whately said The families of the residents of nursing homes are treated as key workers with weekly tests.
  • Nicola Stör trolled the PM spat at his wise men, saying their "breaker" was "rooted in scientific advice";
  • Bolton West Conservative MP Chris Green resigned as parliamentary private secretary because of the new lockdown.

The HMS Vigilant (pictured), a £ 3 billion nuclear submarine called "HMS Sex and Cocaine", has seen a coronavirus outbreak in the crew who are resisting the lockdown

Florida is the third largest state in the United States with a total of 738,749 cases.

Maintenance is currently underway on Trident 2 – a ballistic missile fired from the submarine – which is stored on the submarine.

A source told The Sun: "They have been by the side for weeks and seafarers do what seamen do."

A Royal Navy spokesman said: "We are not addressing issues related to submarine operations."

HMS Vigilant has been the subject of controversy over the years.

In 2017, it was revealed that nine soldiers were thrown from HMS Vigilant after cocaine was found in their blood.

More than 35 crew members on the top-secret HMS Vigilant - one of the four submarines that make up Britain's nuclear deterrent - tested positive after leaving the US Naval Base in Kings Bay, Georgia (file image)

More than 35 crew members on the top secret HMS Vigilant – one of the four submarines that make up the UK's nuclear deterrent – tested positive after leaving the US Navy base in Kings Bay, Georgia (file image)

While the submarine was docked in the United States to pick up nuclear warheads, they are said to have held drug parties – a man had sex with a prostitute in a swimming pool.

A police report allegedly shows he paid £ 120 for sex and then stole the money from her purse.

This was followed by four officers from HMS Vigilant who were disciplined about matters with other crew members.

This became known after an alleged affair between his captain Commander Stuart Armstrong, 41, and Lieutenant Rebecca Edwards, 25. Both were taken out of service on board.

Another soldier on the ship faced a court-martial after flying into the AWOL and flying to the UK to see his girlfriend. Two more stopped after the scandals.

The cost of £ 21 trillion for Covid: IMF warn that the pandemic will permanently damage living standards worldwide

By James Salmon for the Daily Mail

The Covid crisis will burst a £ 21 trillion hole in the global economy and cause "permanent damage" to living standards, the International Monetary Fund warned.

After the death toll from the pandemic climbed to over a million, the Washington-based watchdog set out yesterday the devastating global economic impact of the virus.

In its latest World Economic Outlook, the IMF predicted that the crisis would leave financial scars for years, while the recovery would be "long, uneven and uncertain".

Setbacks: IMF chief economist Gita Gopinath said the crisis will leave scars and any recovery will be "long, uneven and uncertain".

Setbacks: IMF chief economist Gita Gopinath said the crisis will leave scars and any recovery will be "long, uneven and uncertain".

The total loss of production caused by the pandemic is also forecast to reach $ 28 trillion (£ 21 trillion) by the middle of the decade.

This is a dent worth more than the size of the US economy, the largest in the world.

Gita Gopinath, chief economist at the IMF, said it was "a serious setback for improving the average standard of living in all groups of countries".

She added: “This crisis is likely to leave scars in the medium term as labor markets take time to heal, investment slows down due to uncertainty and balance sheet issues, and school loss affects human capital.

“All countries are now facing what I would call the long climb – a difficult climb that will be long, uneven, and uncertain. And prone to setbacks.

& # 39; The road ahead is marred with extraordinary uncertainty. Faster progress in health interventions like vaccines and therapies could accelerate the ascent. It could also get worse, especially if the number of severe outbreaks increases significantly. & # 39;

Despite all of this, the IMF has become a bit more optimistic since the summer and forecasts that the global economy will shrink by 4.4 percent this year.

The IMF predicts the total loss of production caused by the pandemic will hit $ 28 trillion (£ 21 trillion) by the middle of the decade

The IMF predicts the total loss of production caused by the pandemic will hit $ 28 trillion (£ 21 trillion) by the middle of the decade

This is an improvement on the 5.2 percent decline it forecast in its last June World Economic Outlook.

The upgrade reflects both that the recession wasn't quite as severe in the second quarter as previously feared, and that economies around the world have recovered faster than expected as the lockdowns were lifted.

But even a 4.4 percent decline would still mark the world's worst slump since the Great Depression in the 1930s, the fund said.

The IMF also warned that the recovery would be a little slower than previously thought, given a surge in infections and a new wave of lockdowns and restrictions to slow the spread.

That sentiment was borne out by the Governor of the Bank of England, Andrew Bailey, who yesterday told colleagues on the House of Lords Economic Committee, "The tough courts are still ahead."

Experts were surprised by the strength of the UK's economic recovery when the March national lockdown was lifted.

However, the introduction of local lockdowns and other restrictions to combat a second wave of the virus has fueled fears that the recovery could be wiped out.

The IMF has slightly improved its forecast for the UK, forecasting that the economy will contract 9.8 percent this year, just like France.

This corresponds to a decrease of 10.2 percent in June. The UK is expected to lag behind the euro zone, which is expected to shrink 8.3 percent this year.

Of the G7 group of the most important industrialized countries, only Italy is likely to perform worse.

However, the UK economy is also expected to recover 5.9 percent over the next year, faster than the euro zone.

The IMF stressed that without “unprecedented fiscal, monetary and regulatory responses” to support household incomes and businesses, the global outlook would have been grim.

Gopinath said the steps taken "helped save lives and livelihoods and prevented financial disaster".

As governments ponder how to tackle Covid's spiraling debt, she warned, "It is important that fiscal and monetary support not be withdrawn prematurely as much as possible."

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