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A quarter of the crew of a £ 3 billion nuclear submarine has been labeled positive for coronavirus


A £ 3 billion nuclear submarine called "HMS Sex and Cocaine" saw a coronavirus outbreak on its crew, breaking the rules.

According to a source, more than 35 crew members tested positive on the top-secret HMS Vigilant after several left the U.S. Navy base in Kings Bay, Georgia.

Among those who tested positive – a quarter of the ship's team – included a doctor and a senior executive.

The codes for the use of the nuclear weapons stored on the submarine are reportedly known only to this officer and one other person.

Seafarers defied orders to go to strip clubs, bars and restaurants in Georgia – 318,000 coronavirus cases and 7,282 deaths.

They traveled 200 miles away to a Florida beach on one trip, an insider said.

In other coronavirus news yesterday:

  • London Mayor Sadiq Khan warned it was "inevitable" that London would fall into a second stage lockdown this week.
  • A poll found that the British don't believe Prime Minister Boris Johnson "Three-step" lock goes far enough;
  • Tory curfew rebels symbolically protested against the closure of the pub at 10 p.m., but could not prevent it.
  • Health Secretary Helen Whately said The families of the residents of nursing homes are treated as key workers with weekly tests.
  • Nicola Stör trolled the PM spat at his wise men, saying their "breaker" was "rooted in scientific advice";
  • Bolton West Conservative MP Chris Green resigned as parliamentary private secretary because of the new lockdown.

The HMS Vigilant (pictured), a £ 3 billion nuclear submarine called "HMS Sex and Cocaine", has seen a coronavirus outbreak in the crew who are resisting the lockdown

More than 35 crew members on the top secret HMS Vigilant - one of the four submarines that make up the UK's nuclear deterrent - tested positive after leaving the US Navy base in Kings Bay, Georgia (file image)

More than 35 crew members on the top secret HMS Vigilant – one of the four submarines that make up the UK's nuclear deterrent – tested positive after leaving the US Navy base in Kings Bay, Georgia (file image)

Florida is the third largest state in the United States with a total of 738,749 cases.

The HMS Vigilant, along with four other submarines, is part of Britain's nuclear deterrent.

Maintenance work is currently underway on Trident 2 – a ballistic missile fired from the submarine – which is housed on the ship.

A source told The Sun: "They have been by the side for weeks and seafarers do what seamen do."

A Royal Navy spokesman said: “We are not addressing any issues related to submarine operations.

"If an individual's behavior does not meet the high standards we expect, we do not hesitate to take the appropriate action."

HMS Vigilant has been the subject of controversy over the years.

In 2017, it was revealed that nine soldiers were thrown from the submarine after cocaine was found in their blood.

While the submarine was docked in the United States to pick up nuclear warheads, they are said to have held drug parties – a man had sex with a prostitute in a swimming pool.

A police report allegedly shows he paid £ 120 for sex and then stole the money from her purse.

This was followed by four officers from HMS Vigilant who were disciplined about matters with other crew members.

This came to light after an alleged affair between his captain Commander Stuart Armstrong, 41, and Lieutenant Rebecca Edwards, 25. Both were taken out of service on board.

Another soldier on the ship faced a court-martial after flying into the AWOL and flying to the UK to see his girlfriend. Two more stopped after the scandals.

The cost of £ 21 trillion for Covid: IMF warn that the pandemic will permanently damage living standards worldwide

By James Salmon for the Daily Mail

The Covid crisis will burst a £ 21 trillion hole in the global economy and cause "permanent damage" to living standards, the International Monetary Fund warned.

After the death toll from the pandemic climbed to over a million, the Washington-based watchdog set out yesterday the devastating global economic impact of the virus.

In its latest World Economic Outlook, the IMF predicted that the crisis would leave financial scars for years, while the recovery would be "long, uneven and uncertain".

Setbacks: IMF chief economist Gita Gopinath said the crisis will leave scars and any recovery will be "long, uneven and uncertain".

Setbacks: IMF chief economist Gita Gopinath said the crisis will leave scars and any recovery will be "long, uneven and uncertain".

The total loss of production caused by the pandemic is also forecast to reach $ 28 trillion (£ 21 trillion) by the middle of the decade.

This is a dent worth more than the size of the US economy, the largest in the world.

Gita Gopinath, chief economist at the IMF, said it was "a serious setback for improving the average standard of living in all groups of countries".

She added: “This crisis is likely to leave scars in the medium term as labor markets take time to heal, investment slows down due to uncertainty and balance sheet issues, and school loss affects human capital.

“All countries are now facing what I would call the long climb – a difficult climb that will be long, uneven, and uncertain. And prone to setbacks.

& # 39; The road ahead is marred with extraordinary uncertainty. Faster progress in health interventions like vaccines and therapies could accelerate the ascent. It could also get worse, especially if the number of severe outbreaks increases significantly. & # 39;

Despite all of this, the IMF has become a bit more optimistic since the summer and forecasts that the global economy will shrink by 4.4 percent this year.

The IMF predicts the total loss of production caused by the pandemic will hit $ 28 trillion (£ 21 trillion) by the middle of the decade

The IMF predicts the total loss of production caused by the pandemic will hit $ 28 trillion (£ 21 trillion) by the middle of the decade

This is an improvement on the 5.2 percent decline it forecast in its last June World Economic Outlook.

The upgrade reflects both that the recession wasn't quite as severe in the second quarter as previously feared, and that economies around the world have recovered faster than expected as the lockdowns were lifted.

But even a 4.4 percent decline would still mark the world's worst slump since the Great Depression in the 1930s, the fund said.

The IMF also warned that the recovery would be a little slower than previously thought, given a surge in infections and a new wave of lockdowns and restrictions to slow the spread.

That sentiment was borne out by the Governor of the Bank of England, Andrew Bailey, who yesterday told colleagues on the House of Lords Economic Committee, "The tough courts are still ahead."

Experts were surprised by the strength of the UK's economic recovery when the March national lockdown was lifted.

However, the introduction of local lockdowns and other restrictions to combat a second wave of the virus has fueled fears that the recovery could be wiped out.

The IMF has slightly improved its forecast for the UK, forecasting that the economy will contract 9.8 percent this year, just like France.

This corresponds to a decrease of 10.2 percent in June. The UK is expected to lag behind the euro zone, which is expected to shrink 8.3 percent this year.

Of the G7 group of the most important industrialized countries, only Italy is likely to perform worse.

However, the UK economy is also expected to recover 5.9 percent over the next year, faster than the euro zone.

The IMF stressed that without “unprecedented fiscal, monetary and regulatory responses” to support household incomes and businesses, the global outlook would have been grim.

Gopinath said the steps taken "helped save lives and livelihoods and prevented financial disaster".

As governments ponder how to tackle Covid's spiraling debt, she warned, "It is important that fiscal and monetary support not be withdrawn prematurely as much as possible."

As England's Covid-19 outbreak is nowhere near its first peak: Cambridge University experts estimate that more than 400,000 people caught Covid-19 the day before the lockdown – but say almost 50,000 are now infected every day

By Luke Andrews for MAILONLINE

Coronavirus infections in England are still more than eight times below the devastating levels they hit in the spring, and the country's outbreak is growing more slowly than the first wave, according to top scientists.

Cambridge University researchers, whose estimates feed into SAGE's No. 10 Advisory Panel, believe that 47,000 people are currently diagnosed with the disease every day in England. This is in line with a separate state coronavirus surveillance system, which was 45,000 on Oct. 8.

But the scientists who re-modeled their estimates now believe that 412,000 people contracted the virus on March 23, the day Boris Johnson imposed the national lockdown, after cases rose rapidly within a few weeks . At the end of July and beginning of August this value was finally below 1,000.

By comparison, health chiefs released an additional 17,234 official cases across the UK yesterday – a number that's up 20 percent in one week. However, the real size of the outbreak is not apparent in official testing statistics as not everyone who is infected will be tested or even show symptoms that warrant a swab.

The dates of the darkest days of the crisis in March and April are also extremely inaccurate due to the government's lackluster testing program, which meant millions of infected Britons had no tests.

Cambridge experts have been compiling statistics on the English coronavirus outbreak since February and making frequent predictions about how widespread Covid-19 is across the country and in each region. The team also works backwards to estimate the R-rate and the actual number of infections daily.

Although the numbers show that cases are still much lower than when the spring pandemic peaked, scientists have forecast that 500 people could die each day by October 29. This is darker than the bold claims of the two leading government advisors. Those who warned the number could hit 200 by the end of the month.

Data from Public Health England (PHE) and NHS England on Covid-19 confirmed deaths and antibody prevalence, along with information from Google and the ONS on the mix between different age groups, will be used to predict the numbers.

The numbers come as the UK recorded more than 100 coronavirus deaths for the first time in four months yesterday, when officials announced 143 more victims. Health Department statistics show the dire milestone has not been hit since June 17, when 110 laboratory-confirmed deaths were added to the list.

Sir Keir Starmer tonight called for the UK to be pushed into a nationwide "breaker" as soon as possible on accusing Boris Johnson of losing control of the coronavirus pandemic. The Labor chairman said a full shutdown of two to three weeks could be scheduled over mid-term to minimize disruption, but admitted "sacrifices" would have to be made.

His comments came after a senior minister admitted yesterday that national regulations "likely" need to be tightened after it became known that the Prime Minister is at war with SAGE over calling for a "circuit breaker" lockdown across the UK in October calls for half-year rates.

This graph shows infections diagnosed after the announced day (yellow) and the total number of infections believed to have occurred, according to the Cambridge scientists model (red). There are currently an estimated 47,000 new infections per day in England

This graph shows infections diagnosed after the announced day (yellow) and the total number of infections believed to have occurred, according to the Cambridge scientists model (red). There are currently an estimated 47,000 new infections per day in England

These graphs show the number of new infections per day believed to have occurred in England and the east of England during the pandemic. The numbers last until October 9th. The first blue line shows the lockdown imposed on March 23, and the second is the point when the restrictions began to be lifted

These graphs show the number of new infections per day believed to have occurred in England and the east of England during the pandemic. The numbers go up to October 9th. The first blue line indicates the lockdown imposed on March 23, and the second is the point when the restrictions began to be lifted

These graphs show the number of infections believed to have occurred per day through October 9th during the pandemic, according to the Cambridge model. The first blue line represents the lockdown that was imposed on March 23, and the second is where the restrictions were lifted

These graphs show the number of infections believed to have occurred per day through October 9th during the pandemic, according to the Cambridge model. The first blue line represents the lockdown imposed on March 23, and the second is the point when the restrictions began to be lifted

These graphs show the number of coronavirus infections that are believed to have occurred in the Northwest, Northeast and Yorkshire per day by October 9, according to the Cambridge model. The first blue line represents the lockdown imposed on March 23, and the second is the release of the restrictions on May 11th

These graphs show the number of coronavirus infections that are believed to have occurred in the Northwest, Northeast and Yorkshire per day by October 9, according to the Cambridge model. The first blue line represents the lockdown imposed on March 23, and the second is the release of the restrictions on May 11th

These graphs show the number of coronavirus infections believed to have occurred in London and the Midlands per day on the Cambridge model through October 9th. The first blue line represents the lockdown imposed on March 23rd and the second is the release of the restrictions on May 11th

These graphs show the number of coronavirus infections believed to have occurred in London and the Midlands per day on the Cambridge model through October 9th. The first blue line represents the lockdown imposed on March 23rd and the second is the release of the restrictions on May 11th

Britain has more than 100 deaths from Covid-19

The UK recorded more than 100 coronavirus deaths for the first time in four months yesterday when officials announced 143 more victims.

Health Department statistics show the dire milestone has not been hit since June 17, when 110 laboratory-confirmed deaths were added to the list. For comparison: 76 deaths were recorded last Tuesday and 50 deaths yesterday. However, on Mondays, the number of deaths may be affected by a delay in recording over the weekend.

Separate data yesterday showed that the death toll from Covid-19 in England and Wales rose for the fourth straight week, with the disease being mentioned on 321 death certificates in the week ended October 2.

However, the same data from the Office of National Statistics (ONS) shows that only one person under 30 has died since August.

Health chiefs recorded a further 17,234 cases yesterday, an increase of 18.5 percent compared to last Tuesday (14,542). Only 13,972 other positive tests were added to the list yesterday.

The Cambridge team's latest estimate, which runs through October 9, suggests that 47,000 new infections are occurring in England every day. However, the scientists warn that it could actually be 75,000 or 28,000.

Infection levels are set to rise, the team warned, and the number of deaths from coronavirus is likely to quadruple in two weeks, ranging from 240 to 690 by October 26.

They estimated that the R-number is above the dreaded level of one in all regions except the southwest, where they predict it will be around 0.86.

London had the highest rate of infection in the country, with one in five residents considered infected. The northwest has the second highest level. Three out of twenty residents are considered infected.

Those numbers remain well below the peak of the pandemic, which is believed to have infected more than 100,000 people daily for 15 days between March 17 and April 1.

On the day the lockdown was declared, March 23, the model suggests there may have been up to 542,000 new infections. However, the team's best guess was around 412,000.

Experts are forced to rely on estimates of infection because the testing system was unable to diagnose all cases at the height of the pandemic.

A swab shortage meant many patients were never tested for the virus even though they suffered from the tell-tale symptoms, which meant their case was not recorded.

According to experts, only every tenth case was detected in March, but by October that number had risen significantly to an estimated third.

Although the estimated number of new infections is well below March levels, the number of patients hospitalized with the virus has risen to the same number seen in the spring.

In England, 3,905 hospitalized patients were treated for coronavirus on October 13th, up from the level of 3,097 hospitalized patients on March 23rd. However, that was before the high of 17,172 Covid-19 patients in the hospital on April 12.

Cambridge University scientists estimate that around 18,000 people in England contracted the virus a day two weeks before the lockdown – only slightly more than the 15,000 at the end of September. It can take an average of fourteen days for patients to become seriously ill and require hospital treatment.

These graphs show the number of coronavirus deaths that occurred per day in England and the east of England. The first blue line shows the start of the lockdown on March 23rd and the second the first easing of restrictions on May 11th. The red dots indicate the number of observed deaths

These graphs show the number of coronavirus deaths that occurred per day in England and the east of England. The first blue line represents the start of the lockdown on March 23rd and the second the first relaxation of the restrictions on May 11th. The red dots represent the number of observed deaths

These graphs show the number of coronavirus deaths that occurred per day in the Southeast and Southwest. The first blue line shows the start of the lockdown on March 23rd and the second the first relaxation of the restrictions on May 11th. The red dots indicate the number of observed deaths

These graphs show the number of coronavirus deaths that occurred per day in the Southeast and Southwest. The first blue line shows the start of the lockdown on March 23rd and the second the first easing of restrictions on May 11th. The red dots indicate the number of observed deaths

These graphs show the number of coronavirus deaths per day in the Northwest, Northeast and Yorkshire. The first blue line shows the start of the lockdown on March 23rd and the second the first relaxation of the restrictions on May 11th. The red dots indicate the number of observed deaths

These graphs show the number of coronavirus deaths per day in the Northwest, Northeast and Yorkshire. The first blue line shows the start of the lockdown on March 23rd and the second the first easing of restrictions on May 11th. The red dots indicate the number of observed deaths

These graphs show the number of coronavirus deaths that have occurred per day in London and the Midlands. The first blue line shows the start of the lockdown on March 23rd and the second the first easing of restrictions on May 11th. The red dots indicate the number of observed deaths

These graphs show the number of coronavirus deaths that have occurred per day in London and the Midlands. The first blue line represents the start of the lockdown on March 23rd and the second the first relaxation of the restrictions on May 11th. The red dots represent the number of observed deaths

What is the R-Rate in my region and how is it changing?

These estimates are based on the model created by researchers at Cambridge University. The data is presented as a location: R-rate estimate (upper and lower variations for the R-rate predicted)

East England: R1.53 (1.16 to 1.94)

London: R1.37 (1.08 to 1.69)

Midlands: R1.39 (1.15 to 1.66)

North East and Yorkshire: R1.52 (1.30 to 1.77)

Northwest: R1.48 (1.30 to 1.70)

Southeast: R1.48 (1.12 to 1.86)

Southwest: R1.21 (0.87 to 1.64)

Professor Paul Hunter, an epidemiologist from the University of East Anglia, told MailOnline that the discrepancy may be related to the graph not having been updated since October 9.

"One of the problems with modeling is that we really didn't have anywhere near the information about what was going on now," he said.

& # 39; The incidence data appears to have stopped half a week ago on October 9th and is still relatively low compared to the peak.

“But if you look at the deaths, now, on October 10th, it's still very low from its peak – but what is happening is that they predict a sharp increase towards the end of the month.

"The two graphs don't have the same date ranges, which I think is part of the confusion. Therefore, the incidence is based on current data while the deaths are based on predictions."

It has also been suggested that so many people are currently being hospitalized because health workers are more experienced with the virus and act quickly by bringing patients to the hospital for early treatment.

It comes when a senior minister admitted yesterday that national rules will "likely" need to be tougher after it was revealed that Boris Johnson is at war with SAGE over demanding a "breaker" lockdown across the UK.

Housing Secretary Robert Jenrick admitted the government was ready to "go further" after the Prime Minister unveiled his new "three-tier" system of local restrictions last night – but only placed Merseyside in the toughest category, the one Pubs and bars will be closed.

Mr Jenrick pointed to high rates of infection in areas such as Greater Manchester and Nottingham and urged local leaders to agree on terms for Tier 2 advancement. But he rejected claims that the government was not "robust" enough after bomb documents that slipped out late at night showed that their own scientific advisers wanted much more dramatic measures.

The extraordinary spit occurred when Mr Johnson assembled his cabinet to discuss the crisis and infections threatened to spiral out of control. Mr Johnson defiantly insisted at a # 10 press conference last night that he had no intention of exerting British pressure that would "rock" the economy.

But within a few hours, the minutes of a September 21 SAGE meeting were released, showing exactly what the key group was proposing. The timing of the government landfill – which was inconsistent with the usual Friday release schedule – sparked speculation that ministers were trying to bury the news.

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